Tag Archives: SUPERSTORM SANDY

Point/Counterpoint: The Jersey Shore

THIS ARCHITECT’S OPINION:

POINT/COUNTERPOINT
The Aftermath of Superstorm Sandy and The Resurrection of
THE JERSEY SHORE

HOW HIGH IS ENOUGH?

by Laurence E. Parisi, AIA

 

The residents of New Jersey are experienced with hard hitting storms which have caused death and destruction; however, Superstorm Sandy has topped them all as the most destructive hurricane ever recorded in the Garden State. Hurricanes are ranked by the number of deaths and the amount of destruction they cause. There is only one unnamed storm that landed on the Jersey Shore, in 1806, which stands second in line to Sandy. Hurricanes such as Irene, Floyd, Felix and Doria are all ranked as severe storms to have hit New Jersey. Homes were destroyed and some were swallowed by the sea; however, without hesitation the communities were rebuilt, renewed, and brought back to life and existed as the Jersey Shore we know and love without being raised fifteen feet above sea level.

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BILL TO HELP IMPROVE RESPONSE TO THE NEXT SUPERSTORM SANDY RELEASED BY ASSEMBLY PANEL

njleg2_txtGREENWALD, MORIARTY & CHIVUKULA BILL TO HELP IMPROVE RESPONSE TO THE NEXT SUPERSTORM SANDY RELEASED BY ASSEMBLY PANEL

(TRENTON) – An Assembly panel on Monday approved legislation sponsored by Assembly Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, Assemblyman Paul Moriarty and Assemblyman Upendra Chivukula to improve the state’s ability to respond to large-scale natural disasters.

“Whether it is tornadoes in Alabama, earthquakes in California or hurricanes in New Jersey, Good Samaritan laws are critical in ensuring a safe, effective and speedy response to major natural disasters,” said Greenwald (D-Camden / Burlington). “By passing a Good Samaritan law in New Jersey, we will better prepare our state to respond rapidly and efficiently to the next Superstorm Sandy.”

The bill (A2025) would bolster safety inspection capacity in the aftermath of disasters like Sandy – the scale of which can easily overwhelm local governments – by shielding licensed architects and professional engineers from liability when they volunteer to help local governments respond to major natural disasters.
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