Tag Archives: marketing

LAN ASSOCIATES PARTNERS WITH CITY OF NEWARK TO PROVIDE FIRE PREVENTION MATERIALS TO THOUSANDS OF NEWARK SCHOOL CHILDREN

 

In support of National Fire Prevention Week, LAN Associates partnered with the City of Newark and the Newark Fire Department to teach local school children the importance of fire safety and preparedness.

20171011 LAN(From Left to Right) – Newark Fire Fighter Fernandes, Newark Deputy Chief Witte, LAN CEO Ron Panicucci, Principal Garrison, Newark Fire Chief Rufus Jackson, Newark Firefighter Thomas, and Newark Fire Captain Mustafa Al-Mutazzim

 

More than two hundred second and third grade students at Camden Street School participated in a program on fire safety and prevention presented by LAN Associates and the Newark Fire Department. In addition to the presentation, LAN Associates – a full-service architectural and engineering firm based in Midland Park, NJ — supplied National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) approved educational fire prevention materials for 2,000 additional Newark second and third grade students.

 

“As architects and engineers, we find it especially important and rewarding to educate children on the importance of fire safety and prevention,” said Kim Vierheilig, AIA. “It is important students know what to do when an emergency arises at home or in school, and that starts with proactive fire safety presentations such as the one today.”

 

Since 1922, National Fire Prevention Week has been held annually to educate, spread awareness, and commemorate the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.  This year’s NFPA campaign is “Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out!”, and reinforces why having a varied escape plan is so important in the event of a fire.

 

“Partnering with LAN Associates to provide a top-notch fire prevention education program is something we strive for in Newark,” said Fire Chief Rufus Jackson. “This is a public-private partnership on the grassroots level – and it works to enhance the culture of learning in our public schools.”

 

Onque praised the Newark Public Safety Fire Division for its year-long community outreach efforts, including the varied Fire Prevention Week events which will last throughout the month of October.

 

“On behalf of Newark Mayor Ras Baraka, the City is grateful to continue this partnership with LAN Associates to bring a remarkably high-quality fire prevention and preparedness program to our youngest students” said Onque. “Our hope is that students will go home and discuss this important program and the materials with their families.”

 

20171011 LAN 2

Firefighters Thomas and Fernandes led an engaging dialogue on safety tips like stop, drop, and roll, escape plans in the event of a fire, and proper usage of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. The presentation concluded with student touring the fire truck outside the school, where firefighters gave a demonstration on how the fire department responds to 911 calls and the 80lb of equipment they wear.

 

According to a recent NFPA study, 3,390 civilian fire deaths occurred in 2016. NFPA estimates that one civilian death occurred every 2 hours and 35 minutes during that same year.

 

 

 

Working With The Media

AIA-NJIn our recent year end review of the 2014 activities of the AIA New Jersey Public Awareness Committee, we asked you to stay tuned for tools that will help you make a splash in the press. Below, is the first in a series of articles that will help you in that regard. This is just the beginning. Stay tuned for more. With your help, we hope to be able to leverage our strength in numbers to help promote architects and architecture.

You’ve just completed design and implementation of your plans for a building. Or perhaps you feel that the media is ignoring an important architectural story in the news. The question is: Now what? How can you leverage your hard work and expertise to build your reputation and attract future business prospects?

Luckily, for architects, several avenues exist to publicize projects through “earned media” – that is, unpaid, “legitimate” news stories. And with the proliferation of specialized digital media, it’s even more likely that a building that you’ve helped to design can garner significant media coverage.

But first thing’s first. It’s often not enough to simply “cold call” a news outlet in order to garner ink. Working with the media is as much about building relationships as it is about hard news. Remember, reporters are people, too!

Building a working acquaintanceship with your local media is effective not only in building respect for your firm’s individual projects, but also in positioning yourself as a go-to expert for architectural issues. Reporters will often need to quickly reach out to an industry expert in order to obtain necessary information or print a quote for their story. This process is called source filing.

Luckily, beginning the dialogue with your local media is relatively straightforward:

  • Familiarize yourself with local media: The first step to interacting with your local reporters is to understand their publication and their area of expertise. Read your local papers and identify which reporters report on real estate, business, and community development.
  • Email a reporter: In most publications, it’s easy to locate an email address for a particular reporter on its website. Simply send a brief “hello” introducing yourself, your practice, and your specific area of expertise. It helps to reference a story that the reporter wrote recently, which demonstrates your familiarity with their work.
  • Call the publication: Particularly when you’re seeking to connect with a reporter about a timely issue, it’s best to call the publication’s main number and ask for the reporter. You can even invite them to lunch or coffee as an introduction.

While these approaches may not translate to instantaneous news coverage, building a relationship with your local reporter is the most prudent first step to constructing your own public relations campaign. Over time, it will pay dividends.

For more suggestions, refer to AIA Best Practices – Getting Good Press on the web at www.aia.org. Please note this is a password protected, member only website. Therefore, we cannot provide a direct link to the site for you. But you can find it under Practicing Architecture; Best Practices; Part 2 – Firm Management; Chapter 6: Marketing and Business Development. You might also find a lot of other beneficial material in this area of the website.

Kyle Kirkpatrick
Account Supervisor
Beckerman PR Real Estate Team

Bruce D. Turner, AIA
Chair, AIA New Jersey Public Awareness Committee

Social Media is the HGTV of DIY – A wake up call for all you do it yourselfers!

Have you ever watched HGTV and felt inspired to remodel your kitchen, bedroom, or begin a landscaping project?! If so, you may have been delusional about the results, the time it takes to complete, and yes, even its costs. Do it “yourself” really requires a team of professionals to achieve a camera ready result. When you watched that 30 minute DIY TV show, did you see the weeks of prior design work and script writing, did you see the many unnamed workers that perform the work and ask yourself, is that “budget” real, did it include installation costs, adjusted cost of donated products and more importantly did it include the host/designer’s fees? Staging items may have even been brought in during filming that did not stay with the owners. Hours went into editing, camera angles were chosen, and anything that was not perfect was not shown.  Still feeling inspired?

So when something goes viral, when you find a marketing scheme you like for your business, and when you hear success stories from Constant Contact, do you tell yourself “Hey, if they can do it so can I?” Most likely you are wasting hours trying to market your business with no results, you may have several subscriptions and utilizing marketers that are telling you that you are getting “page hits”, but are you getting real-world results?  I bet you are using every single “social media” tool in the Toolbox that is the Internet. Well every job requires a specific tool, knowledge on how to properly use it and unfortunately you are using the wrong end of the screwdriver to paint your walls.

Here are some real world tips for anyone who wants results:

  • Viral versus virus- Are you spamming or stimulating?
  • Unless your logo goes on every product you produce, no one really cares about your label. Use the “free” image that you have been using for your profile picture on social media and Google Business Listings to place an image of what you really do. If you are an architect that only does residential work, well then post a picture of one of your residential projects. That is more of an attention getter than a logo using your initials!
  • Constant Contact will only reach people you have already reached out to! Unless you are a gym, a restaurant or another business that benefits from using coupons, you are wasting your time with e-mail marketing. You are milking the cow twice and making it angry.
  • Unless your target audience is teenagers and college students, get off Facebook for your business marketing. Try this experiment- type the industry and location of your business on Facebook’s search engine. For example, sticking with the architecture theme, try typing architects in NJ. Do you come up? Unless you are a brand, Facebook is for friends.
  • Do use Google or other search engines to increase your results. A great example of excellent marketing was Andersen versus Pella. For a few weeks, when you typed Anderson Windows, the first page hit was Pella’s article on why Pella was better than Anderson.
  • Finally, social media is not “do it YOURSELF”. That defeats the purpose of “social”. No one wants to be friends in real life with someone who only talks about themselves. Nor does anyone want to like, friend, or follow anyone who posts provocative MySpace style photographs of themselves, invites them to play Farmville, Pokes them every 5 seconds, fills up their newsfeed with web cats or emails them 5 times a day without anything interesting to say. Try to market your business as you would a conversation and not a 140 character tweet.

Jason Peist, Assoc. AIA
Regional Associate Director | New Jersey Region
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[email protected]
| @AIANJRAD