Tag Archives: Hurricane Sandy

AIA-NJ Committee Seeks to Collaborate with Municipalities on Design Competitions

Emerging Professionals Committee announces new leadership for re-launched program, plans to assist non-profits and municipalities on small-scale projects

AIA-NJAIA-NJ announced the new leadership of its Emerging Professionals Committee, which represents New Jersey architectural students and their new graduates as well as recently licensed architects.

Tasked with guiding and supporting the careers of aspiring and new architects – approximately 300 of whom operate in New Jersey – the recently re-launched committee will be chaired by Jessica O’Donnell, AIA, and advised by Nicholas Caravella, Assoc. AIA, and Ryan Day, AIA.

With the dual goal of supporting communities and promoting the professional growth of its constituents, the committee is seeking to find ways for emerging professionals to volunteer their services for the betterment of their communities. They hope to collaborate with local municipalities and not-for-profit institutions on small-scale projects for which emerging professionals will team with an experienced architect, providing design solutions to the organizations while benefitting from the learning opportunity inherent in the process.

The committee intends to work with organizations in need of these services through design competitions, providing participants with firsthand project experience and the winning submission with prize money as compensation.

“Engaging our newest and youngest members is a priority for AIA-NJ, and it’s excellent to see the revitalized committee’s hard work to improve our outreach to our rising stars,” said Kim Bunn, president of AIA-NJ. “Many community centers, nonprofits and municipalities can benefit from the design ability of our interns and young professionals and we’re extremely proud of the committee leadership for bringing this initiative to light.”

The committee also has three directors: Grace Friedhoff, Assoc. AIA, who is tasked with leading service initiatives; Megan Pritts, Assoc. AIA, who will lead advocacy efforts; and Mark Barone, AIA, who will oversee educational programming.

In addition to its service, advocacy and educational activities, committee members will also engage in community work, including mentoring high school students interested in architecture.

“There are many municipalities and nonprofits that will find the sort of collaboration we are proposing invaluable,” said Caravella, who has personally worked with the city of Newark on such initiatives in the past. “Whether designing a parklet in urban areas or working on renovations for community cultural centers, there are a variety of design projects of the appropriate scope and size in every county in the state. As members of the architectural profession, we constantly strive to better serve the community, and this is an ideal opportunity for emerging professionals to utilize their capabilities in a way that truly benefits society.”

If you are interested in collaborating with Emerging Professionals on a project, please contact the committee’s board of directors at [email protected] .

NJ Disaster Safety Assessment Seminar

 

Registration Open Now for Post-Disaster Certification program.

April 11, 2015
8:30 am to 4:00 pm
at NJIT School of Architecture

Click here to Sign Up now !

 

 

2015 Disaster Training Promo II with background color

AIA Regional Recovery Working Group Presents:

Two_Years_Later_Announcement_and_Agenda_FINAL_v.2jpg_Page1

Two_Years_Later_Announcement_and_Agenda_FINAL_v.2jpg_Page2

Governor Signs Good Samaritan Bill

AIA New Jersey is pleased to announce the successful completion of one of its major legislative initiatives with the enactment of the Good Samaritan bill signed by Governor Christie yesterday. The profession will be in a position to offer its services to the people of New Jersey during a declared disaster as a first responder with the protections afforded in this statute. We want to thank our prime Sponsor Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald and sponsors Assemblymen Moriarty and Chivukula and the Governor for their support. Below is a press release regarding the bill.

AIA-NJ President Jack Purvis AIA,  along with Homeland Security Committee Chair and Past President Laurence Parisi AIA, President Elect Kurt Kalafsky AIA, and 1st Vice President Kimberly Bunn AIA at press conference with Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald.

AIA-NJ President Jack Purvis AIA, along with Homeland Security Committee Chair and Past President Laurence Parisi AIA, President Elect Kurt Kalafsky AIA, and 1st Vice President Kimberly Bunn AIA at 2013 press conference with Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald.

Greenwald, Moriarty & Chivukula Bill to Help Improve Natural Disaster Response Signed into Law

(TRENTON) – Legislation sponsored by Assembly Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, Assemblyman Paul Moriarty and Assemblyman Upendra Chivukula to improve the state’s ability to respond to large-scale natural disasters has been inked into law.

The law (A-2025) bolsters safety inspection capacity in the aftermath of disasters like Superstorm Sandy – the scale of which can easily overwhelm local governments – by shielding licensed architects and professional engineers from liability when they volunteer to help local governments respond to major natural disasters.

“Whether it’s tornadoes in Alabama, earthquakes in California or hurricanes in New Jersey, Good Samaritan laws are critical in ensuring a safe, effective and speedy response to major natural disasters,” said Greenwald (D-Camden/Burlington). “By passing a Good Samaritan law in New Jersey, we better prepare our state to respond rapidly and efficiently to the next Superstorm Sandy.”

“Not having had this protection deterred many of these professionals from volunteering their services in times of critical need, which unduly restricted our ability to quickly and effectively provide safety inspections after a large-scale disaster,” said Moriarty (D-Camden/Gloucester). “We cannot afford to go without such valuable assistance when the next big storm hits.”

“These are professionals who are willing to volunteer their time, expertise and services to help rebuild communities that have been damaged by major natural disasters,” said Chivukula (D-Middlesex/Somerset). “With the weather expected to become even more severe in the future, it will be wise to have people with expertise who are ready and able to help when the time comes.”

Nearly 400 architects stood ready to use their professional expertise to assist in assessing storm-damaged properties in New York City days after Superstorm Sandy hit, according to a 2013 Crain’s New York Business article. The specter of thousands – if not millions – of dollars in potential lawsuit liability deterred the vast majority from volunteering their assistance, leaving local officials overwhelmed by the scale of the task.

In contrast, Alabama’s Good Samaritan law, enacted in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina, was crucial in the aftermath of devastating tornadoes that in April 2011 killed 64 people and caused $2.2 billion in damage. In response to the devastating category EF-4 tornado, over 200 professionals volunteered nearly 1,300 hours in Tuscaloosa alone, inspecting over 7,000 buildings for safety–critical assistance given the municipality’s limited staff resources.

Under the law, licensed architects or professional engineers would remain liable for the full extent of damages caused by their own acts or omissions that are wanton, willful or grossly negligent.

We are very pleased that the governor has signed the Good Samaritan legislation, particularly with widespread support from both the the Assembly and Senate. By removing prohibitive regulations against building professionals, the Act will allow trained architects and other professionals to quickly and effectively respond to pressing infrastructural issues in times of emergency.  This legislation reflects the mission of the AIA to contribute its collective expertise when it is needed most, which is crucial in the planning and rebuilding of New Jersey’s communities. We commend lead sponsor and Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, along with sponsors Paul Moriarity and Upendra Chivukula, for their sound and rational advocacy of this bill.

Good Samaritan Signed Into Law

Greenwald, Moriarty & Chivukula Bill to Help Improve Natural Disaster Response Signed into Law

(TRENTON) – Legislation sponsored by Assembly Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, Assemblyman Paul Moriarty and Assemblyman Upendra Chivukula to improve the state’s ability to respond to large-scale natural disasters has been inked into law.
The law (A-2025) bolsters safety inspection capacity in the aftermath of disasters like Superstorm Sandy – the scale of which can easily overwhelm local governments – by shielding licensed architects and professional engineers from liability when they volunteer to help local governments respond to major natural disasters.
“Whether it’s tornadoes in Alabama, earthquakes in California or hurricanes in New Jersey, Good Samaritan laws are critical in ensuring a safe, effective and speedy response to major natural disasters,” said Greenwald (D-Camden/Burlington). “By passing a Good Samaritan law in New Jersey, we better prepare our state to respond rapidly and efficiently to the next Superstorm Sandy.”
“Not having had this protection deterred many of these professionals from volunteering their services in times of critical need, which unduly restricted our ability to quickly and effectively provide safety inspections after a large-scale disaster,” said Moriarty (D-Camden/Gloucester). “We cannot afford to go without such valuable assistance when the next big storm hits.”
“These are professionals who are willing to volunteer their time, expertise and services to help rebuild communities that have been damaged by major natural disasters,” said Chivukula (D-Middlesex/Somerset). “With the weather expected to become even more severe in the future, it will be wise to have people with expertise who are ready and able to help when the time comes.”
Nearly 400 architects stood ready to use their professional expertise to assist in assessing storm-damaged properties in New York City days after Superstorm Sandy hit, according to a 2013 Crain’s New York Business article. The specter of thousands – if not millions – of dollars in potential lawsuit liability deterred the vast majority from volunteering their assistance, leaving local officials overwhelmed by the scale of the task.
In contrast, Alabama’s Good Samaritan law, enacted in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina, was crucial in the aftermath of devastating tornadoes that in April 2011 killed 64 people and caused $2.2 billion in damage. In response to the devastating category EF-4 tornado, over 200 professionals volunteered nearly 1,300 hours in Tuscaloosa alone, inspecting over 7,000 buildings for safety—critical assistance given the municipality’s limited staff resources.
Under the law, licensed architects or professional engineers would remain liable for the full extent of damages caused by their own acts or omissions that are wanton, willful or grossly negligent.

Regional Architecture Groups Look At Critical Infrastructure in a Post-Sandy World

Reprint of article published on July 11, 2014, on NJBiz

Chapters of the American Institute of Architects from New Jersey, New York, Connecticut and Rhode Island held a “regional recovery working group” Friday on the campus of Fairleigh Dickinson University in Madison, focusing on changes to critical infrastructure design in a post-Hurricane Sandy world.

The event was the third in a series of Sandy-related workshops. Others have looked at Sandy’s effects on cities and coastal communities.

Speakers from both the public and private sectors weighed in Friday, touching on issues concerning resiliency, design, building codes and the coordination on the parts of regional governing bodies.

“Forums like this are pretty awesome because it’s the idea exchange that happens,” said John Boulé, a vice president of global planning firm Parsons Brinckerhoff. “Brain cells start to knock against each other … and hopefully it will spur you to some action.”

Boulé discussed protecting transportation assets and rethinking planning strategies, namely by incorporating cost-benefit analysis into the framework.

“You have to come up with different ways of thinking about risk,” Boulé said.

Scott Davis, senior advisor in the office of the secretary at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, said that at the federal level, making progress after Sandy is the goal, but it’s difficult to put broad timetables on projects.

“I think we’re all looking to move forward as quickly as possible and some projects might be more complicated than others,” Davis said.

Davis added that he feels a focus point in the future for architecture groups and others in the industry will be turning resiliency into a household word, much like sustainability is today.

Read Full Article…

AIA-NJ

Architecture for Humanity REDC

REDC

Resilience Through Education & Design Center

July 18-20 at the Seaside Heights Community Center,
1000 Bay Blvd., Seaside Heights, NJ 08751.  

Questions and comments

Contact person is: Gail Gambarini, Regional Project Coordinator, 917-751-3788,
[email protected] 

REDC_Flyer

Regional Recovery Workshop – Second Workshop in Series

Regional Recovery Working Group Workshop flyerWhen:     8:30 AM – 4:00 PM MONDAY, MARCH 31

Where:   New York Institute of Technology – School of Architecture and Design, Old Westbury, New York.

Register to Attend:  Please Click here to RSVP

This day long workshop is geared for stakeholders across the four state region working in coastal communities at all scales of rebuilding and planning. The Working Group’s on going mission is to share experience and case studies of recovery efforts across the region, highlight good practices, notes changes to building codes along with updates to state and federal procedures, financing and opportunities. Attendees will gain real tools for rebuilding and insight into codes and regulations.

Regional Recovery Working Group Info

BILL TO HELP IMPROVE RESPONSE TO THE NEXT SUPERSTORM SANDY RELEASED BY ASSEMBLY PANEL

njleg2_txtGREENWALD, MORIARTY & CHIVUKULA BILL TO HELP IMPROVE RESPONSE TO THE NEXT SUPERSTORM SANDY RELEASED BY ASSEMBLY PANEL

(TRENTON) – An Assembly panel on Monday approved legislation sponsored by Assembly Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, Assemblyman Paul Moriarty and Assemblyman Upendra Chivukula to improve the state’s ability to respond to large-scale natural disasters.

“Whether it is tornadoes in Alabama, earthquakes in California or hurricanes in New Jersey, Good Samaritan laws are critical in ensuring a safe, effective and speedy response to major natural disasters,” said Greenwald (D-Camden / Burlington). “By passing a Good Samaritan law in New Jersey, we will better prepare our state to respond rapidly and efficiently to the next Superstorm Sandy.”

The bill (A2025) would bolster safety inspection capacity in the aftermath of disasters like Sandy – the scale of which can easily overwhelm local governments – by shielding licensed architects and professional engineers from liability when they volunteer to help local governments respond to major natural disasters.
Continue reading

Women In Architecture – Meeting & Superstorm Sandy Update

WIA New Jersey

 Women In Architecture

  Super Storm Sandy Update / Committee Meeting

Hosted by Gensler

 WHEN:  Tuesday, February 11th @ 6:00 PM

 WHERE:  10 North Park Place, 4th Floor Morristown, NJ 07960

 RSVP:  [email protected]  by Friday, February 7th

WIA NJ is starting the new year with some great presenters!   Our next meeting will be held on February 11th where Verity Frizzell, AIA, of the Jersey  Shore will be presenting a super storm sandy update.  (This meeting was previously postponed from December).   There will be a brief introduction on FEMA flood zones, case studies of the house lifting projects, zoning and more.    This is approved by AIA for 1 HSW Credit.

We will follow the discussion with our thoughts on how to highlight women architects in NJ throughout the year.

This is a great way to socialize and meet new members of the group.  Light refreshments will be served.
Please see below for details and don’t forget to RSVP by responding to this email by Friday February 7th.

Hope to see you all there!