Tag Archives: Bruce Turner

Governance Week 2016

Happy New Year! Welcome to 2017. I am excited to serve all of you as the 2017-2019 AIA New Jersey Regional Representative to the AIA National Strategic Council. My tenure got a jumpstart early in December when I attended Governance Week 2016. This served as my orientation/initiation to the Strategic Council and a farewell to the outgoing Class of 2016. Among that group is our outgoing Regional Representative Robert Cozzarelli, AIA. His tenure marked the transition from the previous role as Regional Director on the AIA Board to the new role of Regional Representative on the Strategic Council. That is NOT a distinction without a difference. These are significantly different roles. Bob, and the rest of his Class of 2016, were at the forefront of defining this new system which has the specific goal of better serving the members and the profession. After attending these meetings in Washington, DC, I can personally attest to that fact that Bob was highly respected and did a very good job representing us. He will be a tough act to follow. I want to personally thank Bob for his many years of hard work and dedication to the AIA and the support he has offered me throughout the years.

The agenda for the week was packed. Our work started with two half-day sessions of orientation. During these sessions we were reminded that the purpose of the Strategic Council is to advance the profession of architecture by informing the Board and other Institute bodies of important issues and opportunities.  Toward that end we were challenged to continually ask the question: “What does it mean and why does it matter?” and to listen more than we speak. With that in mind I will remind you that my door is always open to all of you. I can be reached by phone at 856-405-0351 or by email at [email protected] Or, if you want to meet face-to-face, and you are in Vineland, you are welcome to stop by. Or, let me know if you want me to come see you.

paul-revere-williams-faiaAfter our orientation sessions, my group (the Class of 2019, or XIX as we refer to ourselves) was invited to join a Joint Board/Council Meeting. As you may have read in other publications, this was the meeting where the Gold Medal, the Firm Award, The Topaz Medallion, The Kemper Award and the Whitney M. Young Award were considered and ratified. It was a humbling experience to be in the room as these awards were deliberated and announced. It was especially moving to be a witness to the posthumous award of the 2017 AIA Gold Medal to Paul Revere Williams, FAIA.

The next day we were invited to the final Strategic Council Assembly of 2016. This was a day-long session with a variety of generative exercises, outreach exercises, reports, discussions and agenda setting for 2017. Beyond the specific discussion on any topic, it was apparent that the focus of the Council, and the remainder of the leadership, has the member experience at its core. This discussion was informed by the goals of the 2016-2020 Strategic Plan, namely: Elevating Public Awareness, Advocating for the Profession and Advancing Knowledge and Expertise. To achieve its goals, the AIA has articulated the following primary objectives: Career Pathways, Influence, Innovation, Market Leadership, Outreach, Policy, Relevance and Research. All the while we are constantly being challenged to try to find The Next Big Thing.

After (and among) all of these working sessions, we also had time for networking with our fellow Councilors and other leaders of the Institute. Since the Council only meets face-to-face three times during the year, this time was critically important to build or expand these relationships. Among these meetings was a reception at the Institute Headquarters, the AIA Presidential Inauguration, which was held at the Museum of African American History and Culture, and a Class of 2016 Dinner that was hosted at the home of Robert and Holly Ivy. I was glad to be joined at the inaugural by my wife Sarah, and David and Suzanne Del Vecchio, Jerry and Marsha Eben, and Verity and Andy Frizzell. I am sure they will also be glad to share with you their impressions of that event.

AIAeagle_2016Now it is time to get down to work. These are exciting and challenging times for our profession. But, working together I am confident that we all can make the AIA and our profession of ever increasing service to society.

Bruce D. Turner, AIA
AIA New Jersey 2017-2019 Regional Representative

AIANJ Election Open

AIAeagle_2016Voting opened June 10th, and will continue until June 24th, for the election of AIA New Jersey’s next AIA Regional Representative.  Two qualified candidates have put their names forward to represent you the AIANJ members on nationals Strategic Council –

See each candidates statements and information here.

 

      Laurence Parisi, AIA        

               Bruce Turner, AIA     

 

parisi_2012BDT2

 

 

 

 

 

 

              

                 

If you did not get an email for AIA New Jersey through SimplyVoting.com please contact the AIANJ office (Lori Lee).  Also, make sure to check your spam filters.
Voting is very easy and only takes a few minutes, please have your voice be heard.

 

 

 

Working With The Media Pays Off

AIA-NJI hope you are familiar with our Working With The Media series. Having read these articles you might wonder if any of this really makes a difference? Well, here is concrete example of how it can work.

I recently read an article in my local newspaper announcing the groundbreaking for a new local public charter school. As we often see, the article named local and state politicians that were present, quoted the executive director of the new school and named both the developer and the contractor for the project. What was missing was the name of the architect.

I did a Google search to see if I could identify the architect for the project, but was unable to find any reliable information. However, I know the contractor and I know a local architect that does a lot of this type of work. Therefore, I sent them both text messages to try to confirm the name of the architect. While I waited for their responses, I sent the following email to the newspaper:

I read with great interest your article, Vineland School Breaks Ground, Saturday, May 28, 2016. I am glad to see this new school coming to our community. I also noted that the article referenced a local contractor with whom I have completed multiple successful projects – Capri Construction.

However, I was very disappointed to see that the article does not mention the architect for the project. This is especially troubling when one considers the focus on STEM (or STEAM) in education today. Architects, and careers in architecture, are a direct result of the STEM/STEAM educational program. It is sad therefore, that the architect is overlooked or deemed irrelevant to an article about the very buildings they are helping to bring to life by virtue of their STEM/STEAM education.

Every building project involves three primary entities: the owner, the architect and the contractor. It is the three-legged stool of every project. It should be fundamental to the who, what, when, where, and why of any article. I urge you to ALWAYS include the name of the architect in any article about any building.

Remember – be it a home, school, or an office; wherever we live, eat or pray; every building has an architect!

Respectfully,

Bruce D. Turner, AIA
President, AIA South Jersey

I was pleased to receive a very prompt response from the newspaper:

Unfortunately – the name of the architect was not included with the information provided by the school.

However, I will keep your suggestion in mind next time I receive this type of information.

Thank you!

This is not an unusual response. And, the conversation could have ended there. But, I decided to continue the dialogue. Once I confirmed the name of the architect – Manders Merighi Portadin Farrell Architects of Vineland – I sent that information to the newspaper. I also offered that if the newspaper ever has difficulty finding this type of information for any of their articles that they could contact me. Within a very short period of time I received a reply from the newspaper that the information was added to the online version of the story. I was perfectly satisfied with this outcome. I thanked them and thought that would be the end of it. However, the next day my original email appeared on the opinion page of the newspaper. That was icing on the cake. Not only had I engaged in a positive conversation with the newspaper about the value of including the name of the architect, but I also got the opportunity to deliver that message to a larger public audience.

This is the value of working with the media. This isn’t difficult. Any of us can do it. In fact we all can. It won’t always deliver such immediate and positive results, but we need to try. If the media hears from enough architects on a regular and routine basis we can make an impact. After all, we are their readers. They will appreciate our attentiveness to what they write.

Bruce D. Turner, AIA
Co-Chair, AIA New Jersey Public Awareness Committee

For more suggestions, refer to AIA Best Practices – Getting Good Press on the web at http://www.aia.org. Please note this is a password protected, member only website. Therefore, we cannot provide a direct link to the site for you. But you can find it under Practicing Architecture; Best Practices; Part 2 – Firm Management; Chapter 6: Marketing and Business Development. You might also find a lot of other beneficial material in this area of the website. You can also find samples of other quick responses here.

If you would like to read the previous articles in this series, please see the following links:

Delivering Your Message In An Interview

Building Relationships

Writing a Letter to the Editor

Composing a Press Release

Press Release Boilerplates

Personal Engagement

The Big Green Boxes of Cheer

During the AIA National Convention in Philadelphia, AIA South Jersey President, Bruce D. Turner, AIA, was among a group of architects who helped deliver 136 gift boxes to patients at St. Christopher’s Hospital in Philadelphia, PA. Dubbed the Big Green Boxes of Cheer, the event was organized by Andersen Windows and Cheeriodicals, a national corporate team building company that conducts philanthropic events benefiting children’s hospitals, Ronald McDonald Houses, Veterans Hospitals and other charities across the country.

The gift boxes were assembled at the Andersen booth on the Expo Floor by the Andersen team, architects, and Cheeriodicals team members, and then delivered to the patients at St. Christopher’s Hospital.  The boxes were made up of age-appropriate magazines and activity books, room decorations, puzzles, stickers and games for the children to enjoy.

To learn more about Cheeriodicals, visit www.boxesofcheer.com, or follow Cheeriodicals on Twitter and Facebook.

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Pictured, left to right are: Denise Thomson, AIA, President, AIA Philadelphia; Bill Warwick, AIA, Principal at Barton Partners; Joe Bongartz, AIA, Principal at Meyers Design; Joel Pullman, Commercial Sales Director at Andersen Windows; Erin Kelly, AIA, Architect at Francis Cauffman; Gary Massenzio, Architect Business Development Representative at Andersen Windows; Bruce D. Turner, AIA, President, AIA South Jersey; Chelsea Ebling Marketing Coordinator at Two Men and A Truck, Philadelphia; Wes Tavera, Commercial Business Development Representative at Andersen Windows; Pat Henry, Commercial Business Development Representative at Andersen Windows; and Kate Ward, AIA, Business Development Director at Bernardon Architects.

 

Small Firm Exchange (SFx) Lounge at Convention

BDT2If you’re a small firm or sole practitioner and attending the 2016 AIA National Convention in Philadelphia, you won’t want to miss the Small Firm Exchange (SFx) Lounge. Come by to meet new people, view a demo of the AIA Kinetic App 2.0, and discuss what challenges you most in the practice of architecture. Hear more about the Small Firm Practitioner Collection, a curated lineup of workshops, seminars, events, and other programs designed to help small firm architects unlock their power and apply the latest trends to their practice.

The SFx Lounge offers a great touch-down area, with comfortable lounge furniture, where you can catch up on your work or catch a brief mini-education session to learn about programs and benefits to help you in your practice! Look for the brightly colored cubes just outside of Hall E near the AIA Expo– stop by.

As your AIA New Jersey representative to the SFx, I will be spending some of my free time at the lounge. If you see me there, I will be happy to make introductions.

The AIA Small Firm Exchange Lounge is sponsored by the AIA Trust.

I hope to see you at the Convention!

Bruce D. Turner, AIA

The Small Firm Round Table (SFRT) was recently renamed the Small Firm Exchange (SFx) to better reflect the idea that the group is meant to foster an exchange of ideas and a sharing of experiences.

Regional Representative Candidates

Two AIANJ members have submitted their names as candidates for election for the position of Regional Representative to be AIANJ’s voice on the AIA national Strategic Council.

Laurence Parisi, AIA, President AIA-NJ 2012

Laurence Parisi, AIA

 

The candidates are :
Laurence Parisis, AIA
and
Bruce D Turner, AIA.

 

 

 

Bruce Turner

Bruce D Turner, AIA

Please take a moment to learn more about these two members of the organization to be able to cast your vote in June.  View their Candidates Statements with the links above.  Contact your local section to find out when the candidates might be visiting your local sections.

Voting will be open online from June 10th to June 24th.  Watch for more information on voting.

– AIA New Jersey

Remembering Malcolm Wells, FAIA

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As part of The Wetlands Institute’s 2016 Winter Lecture Series, AIA South Jersey President Bruce D. Turner, AIA was recently part of a retrospective and panel discussion at the Wetlands Institute in Stone Harbor, NJ. The topic of the presentation was The Legacy of Malcolm Wells, FAIA: The Father of Gentle Architecture. The bulk of the presentation was made by professor and planner Rev. Wayne Conrad. Rev. Conrad was a friend and colleague of Mr. Wells and spoke both personally and professionally about his relationship with “Mac”. He specifically focussed on Mr. Wells’ early life and career, his office in Cherry Hill, his churches in Moorestown and Cherry Hill, and his earth-sheltered architecture in general, including Wells’ home in Cape Cod. Rev. Conrad further reflected on how Wells’ work was inspired by the beauty of nature, and a need for a more sustainable world.

Mr. Turner’s portion of the discussion aimed to put Mr. Wells’ work in the context of the overall architectural profession at the time Mr. Wells was working as well as the professional environment we experience today. That included observations about codes and regulations, standards of practice, legal and liability concerns, LEED, sustainability, energy efficiency, the 2030 Challenge and Cradle-to-Cradle ideologies. He also sought to draw parallels for the audience with architects and architecture which they might be familiar, or recently observed in the media, such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Fay Jones, Bjarke Ingels, and Alejandro Aravena.

A third member of the panel was Rev. Bob Williams. Rev. Williams reflected on his personal liturgical experience ministering from Wells’ St. Andrews United Methodist Church in Cherry Hill. This also included observations about the use of light, the use of natural materials, and the sense of proportion and scale present in these buildings.

For more information about Malcolm Wells, FAIA, please visit his website here. For more information about the Wetlands Institute and other programs and activities they offer, please visit the Wetlands Institute website here.

AIA New Jersey Interviewed by WPIX TV Regarding Lightweight Wood Construction

edgewater-fire-chopper-2In the wake of the tragic events of the Avalon at Edgewater fire, Justin Mihalik, AIA, the newly elected President-Elect of the New Jersey chapter of the American Institute of Architects, was recently interviewed by WPIX TV regarding the use of lightweight wood construction.  You can see the WPIX report here. The report is 5:26 in length.  Justin’s comments start at approximately the 1:59 mark and run through the 3:00 mark.

Granted, the conversation is far more complex than can be explained in one minute of TV time. And, the issue has received significant attention, including legislation proposing mandating fire sprinklers in all residential construction (Bill A1698) and a proposed two-year moratorium on all lightweight wood construction. Given the severity of the event and the public attention, it is more important than ever that architects and AIA New Jersey have a voice in this discussion.

This issue is being actively addressed by our Codes & Standards Committee, chaired by Robert Longo, AIA, our Legistative & Government Affairs Committee, chaired by David Del Vecchio, AIA, our Public Awareness Committee, chaired by Bruce Turner, AIA, our President, Kimberly Bunn, AIA, our Executive Director, Joe Simonetta, and the Executive Committee. Therefore, please make sure you share your opinions with your leaders of AIA New Jersey and your political representatives. Architects cannot stand on the sidelines while others determine the shape of the built environment.

Bruce Turner, AIA
Public Awareness Committee Chair