Tag Archives: ArchWeek17

Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! Rowan University Holly Pointe Commons by Erdy McHenry Architecture, LLC wins an AIA NJ Merit Award in the residential category

 

red_eagleHOLLY POINTE COMMONS, ROWAN UNIVERSITY:  GLASSBORO, NJ

Erdy McHenry Rowan U

Holly Pointe Commons is located at the southeast corner of Rowan University’s main campus, bordered by Mullica Hill Road (route 322) and North Main Street. The building includes two interconnected wings joined by study bridges above the ground level. The building is organized along a gradual curve establishing a formal campus oval at the terminus to the existing pedestrian campus greenway. The outer edge of the oval creates a new campus gateway to visitors approaching the university from the east while enhancing student safety. The building is situated with a sensitivity toward the natural landscape and surrounded by a rain garden serving as a visual/physical buffer and an environmentally sensitive approach to water management. A new dining facility anchors the western end of the site, overlooking historic Abbott’s Pond.  Student housing, more than simply a place for students to eat and sleep, offers an opportunity to foster community and lifelong social impact. With that in mind, this 1,415 bed residential program is organized around smaller communities (pods) of 35 to 40 students in a college house experience, providing for the physical and social needs of students. Social and academic development is nurtured and supported throughout the living/learning community by an integrated series of lounges, recreation and laundry facilities encouraging interaction among residents.

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Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! MD Anderson Cancer Center by HDR wins an AIA NJ Honor Award in the built category

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THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS

MD ANDERSON CANCER CENTER

ZAYED BUILDING FOR PERSONALIZED CANCER CARE

HDR Zayed

PREMISE: Architecture as a catalyst to curing cancer.   The design reinterprets the conventional laboratory building typology, and replaces it with a people-centric solution with a nexus of knowledge transfer and discovery at its heart.  The transparency of the design both literally and symbolically sheds light on new ideas that are shared by all.

CONCEPT: The building is articulated into four wings and a central hub. Wings are either office neighborhoods or warehouse labs. Office neighborhoods promote interdisciplinary research, and this co-location of scientists fosters knowledge transfer and idea exchange. The expanse of laboratories allows for flexibility and adaptability over time, and for efficient engineering solutions. The central hub acts as a living room and communal focus for the scientist and faculty. A central communicating stair provides vertical interaction between floors.

PROGRAM: The Zayed Building for Personalized Cancer Care is a 610,000 GSF medical research laboratory building that will house the Institute for Personalized Medicine and the Pancreatic Cancer Center. The facility is designed to accommodate the move by MD Anderson away from a departmental research structure, toward an interdisciplinary structure of programs, centers, and institutes.

ENERGY/ENVIRONMENT: Separation of lab and office allows for independent mechanical systems. Laboratory HVAC equipment has a robust energy reduction and recovery system. (Conserve and Aircuity systems). Wings allow for narrow floor plates promoting views and natural light to occupied spaces.  A condensate water reclamation system for irrigation is being implemented. The glass facades are high-performance, with vertical and horizontal shading systems.

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Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! 93 Reade Street by CTS Group wins an AIA NJ Merit Award in the historic preservation category

93 reade 1red_eagle93 READE STREET, NEW YORK CITY

 

CTS 93 Reade

HISTORICAL NARRATIVE

93 Reade St. is located in New York City’s Tribeca South Historic District.  This 5-story cast iron store and loft building was constructed in 1857 for the Jones family and is among the oldest surviving cast-iron-fronted buildings in New York.  Designed in the Italianate style, the building’s ornate façade is split into four bays at each story.  Bays are emphasized with fluted Corinthian columns while each floor line is emphasized by an ornate dentiled cornice.  On the upper stories, the window openings have flat-head arches with chamfered corners at the second through fourth stories and round arches at the fifth story.  Above the building cornice is a central arched pediment.  The cast iron façade had suffered from a significant lack of maintenance.  Additionally, it had undergone alterations in the form of a fire escape installation around the turn of the century and the original glass eye vault was covered with metal diamond plate with vault doors installed at the two west-most bays.

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Knightsbridge Properties acquired 93 Reade Street in 2011 and proposed an adaptive reuse for residential condominiums with a complete exterior restoration.  The CTS Group was retained by Knightsbridge Properties to prepare design and construction documents for the exterior façade restoration.  Restoration work was completed in 2016.

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FAÇADE RESTORATION

The Project included comprehensive restoration of 93 Reade Street’s 5-story cast iron façade which includes an arched building cornice pediment and 1st-floor storefront cornice.  As in many restorations, the complete extent of the work was not established until the scaffold was erected and the façade was fully surveyed.  However, major damage was apparent in the east and west bays due to settlement at the building’s party walls. Paint was removed from the entire façade using grit blasting and paint removers.  This revealed additional damage which had been obscured by the paint. Sections of the façade were carefully identified, tagged and removed to the restorer’s facility for restoration work.  Restoration included replacement of all missing and severely damaged features.  All the replacements were based on the original building features from which molds for the new castings were made.  All replacement components are cast iron and all new anchors are stainless steel for longevity.  All façade features were surveyed for damage to their supports.  All compromised supporting structure was repaired or replaced.  There were numerous in-situ repairs. These were done to limit wholesale disassembly where possible.  These repairs included work such as “stitching” for crack repair and adding sheet metal cladding at some sill areas to remedy back pitching due to structural settlement. All original cast iron column capitals had been removed from the building.  Rather than replicate the originals (for which no good photographic images existed) the Landmarks Commission approved a design which was modeled on, but not identical to, a typical column capital.  Due to their complexity the capitals were fabricated from GFRC.

Scientific paint analysis was used to determine the original cast iron paint color.  The entire cast iron façade was re-painted based on the analysis.  There is only a limited number of skilled cast iron restoration firms.  We acknowledge the capabilities of Allen Architectural Metals in realizing this successful, high quality, cast iron restoration.

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Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! Olympic Archery Park by ikon.5 wins an AIA NJ Merit Award in the unbuilt category

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red_eagleOlympic Archery Park, Clinton, New Jersey
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Sitting in a bucolic sloping meadow of native tall grasses and stands of black walnuts, Archery Park is a rusting rural shed nestled within old growth landscape of northwest New Jersey to house an indoor Olympic Archery training facility. To mitigate its large 70 meter footprint on this natural site, the building has been carefully integrated with the
topography. Exposed concrete walls of the indoor range retain the sloping land and create a level meadow to the north for an outdoor competition range and a flat grade below for the indoor range.
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The natural slope of the site gently rolls around the indoor range and establishes a landscaped entry court of river birch trees and native grasses. Rough-hewn concrete, regional field stone and corten steel panels harmoniously unite the structure to its natural surroundings. The corten roof overhang, screens and panels allow the sun, over the course of the day, to cast dramatic shadows on the building thus further integrating the structure to its natural condition. Perforated openings in the rusting steel panels sign the function of the building from the adjacent roadway. In
addition to the Olympic-sized indoor training range, the facility houses offices, classrooms and support facilities for archery and hunter education.
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Architecture April !


Welcome to Architecture April!

Later this month, #AIANJ will be CELEBRATING #ArchWeek17, traveling to Orlando for #A17con AIA Conference on Architecture 2017, and throwing our hands up in honor of our new Fellow, Jerome Eben, FAIA!

AIA National Architecture Week is April 9 – 15. National Architecture Week is celebrated the week of Thomas Jefferson’s birthday, which is April 13th.  While not educated as an architect, Jefferson is the only U.S. president to be recognized for his architectural affinity.

It’s the perfect time to show your love of Architecture to your friends, family and clients by SHARING #AIANJ’s posts on to YOUR business and personal social media pages! Set your following of our Facebook page to “see first” in your newsfeed to be sure you don’t miss any great photos of these events!