Tag Archives: AIANJ EPiC

EPiC Tour NextFab of Technology Month

d0843419-9920-41af-be7d-80260dc61830Join EPiC West Jersey for “Technology Month” with guided-tour of NextFab, a “maker-space” and co-working facility that integrates design and fabrication with a large array of technologically advanced as well as traditional fabrication tools.  Come and explore Nextfab’s metal shop, wood shop, laser-cutting, 3D scanning and 3D printing studio.
Where: NextFab 
2025 Washington Avenue, Philadelphia
When: February 24
6:00 – 8:00 pm

Cost: $5
CEU: 1 HSW Credit
LIMITED SPOTS AVAILABLEi_am_epic

REGISTER HERE

AIA South Jersey EPiC Event

Date:  Thursday, February 9, 2017
Time:  6:00 pm
Location:  Strike Zone Lanes
Egg Harbor City, NJ

Cost:  Free

All Emerging Professionals Invited

RSVP:  Christina Amey, AIA
[email protected]
609-602-6669

aia-sj-epic-feb-9-2017-invitation

Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals – Brian Penschow

“Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals” is an eight-part series that will be published on the AIA NJ blog over the course of the month of October, AIA Emerging Professionals Month. In this series, our young professionals will chronicle the personal stories of how they were attracted to become architects — and how architecture inspires them.

epic_penshaw.jpg    Drawing Out My Inner Creativity

I like to joke with people that I came to architecture after trying accounting, anthropology, and archaeology, but that isn’t really true – my career path wasn’t nearly that simple. And while it is true that I played with legos and lincoln logs when I was a child, grew up in and around the beautiful architecture of New York City, and had a poster of the World Trade Center with the 1976 King Kong on my bedroom wall, none of those things inspired me to become an architect or even led me to architecture school.

In grade school, I wanted to be a marine biologist, but I didn’t know how to make a life out of that. (Ironically, my wife found a way; she actually teaches Marine Biology.)

As I grew older, my plans transformed and I was convinced that I would be a patent attorney, as my logic skills and gifts with mathematics and science would help me excel in that field. I planned to get an undergraduate engineering degree, and then go to law school, but none of that worked out. The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry.

While I did enter engineering school at the age of seventeen, I never finished my degree. After bouncing around several different jobs, some of which I considered possible careers, I decided to go back to school and study business, which ended up being a complete disaster. I was good at engineering, but in engineering there is one particular solution to a problem, and there is very limited room for creativity. I found business school very boring, and it’s no exaggeration to say that I was completely lost.

It wasn’t until I took my first class in architecture at my local community college that I finally felt at home. I was willing to work long hours, stay up all night, cry after brutal critiques, and even sacrifice a social life for a discipline that would allow me to use all of my skills and creativity. Architectural school, for the first time, helped me release my inner creativity that was always trying to get out.

My inspiration for becoming an architect, and for producing architecture comes from within. Finding that locus of inspiration within me is the secret to my ambition, my drive, and, in large part, to my success.

Brian Penschow, AIA

Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals – Megan Pritts

megan_pritts“Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals” is an eight-part series that will be published on the AIA NJ blog over the course of the month of October, AIA Emerging Professionals Month. In this series, our young professionals will chronicle the personal stories of how they were attracted to become architects — and how architecture inspires them.

At the age of 5, I already knew I wanted to become an architect. What inspired me was the environment around me in which I grew up. Living in the suburbs, I drew variations of what I saw from houses to gardens to school buildings. I drew a house for each of my friends with vibrant colors and imaginative shapes that reflected the personality or image of them in my head.I drew each of these houses from the view of the street and later learned that one side or face of a building is called a facade. My series of facade studies started taking shape within a neighborhood where I drew landscapes, roads and driveways connecting all of the homes to other buildings like schoolhouses. I assume this progression from drawing houses to interconnected neighborhoods came from riding the school bus every day and beginning to understand how neighborhoods are planned and connected.

I would argue that anything can be inspirational for a child. I found so much inspiration from my natural surroundings and the built world I lived in that I used that to imagine new structures that would enhance the existing environment. My passion for drawing and my early imagination led me to develop a sense or ability to design at a young age.

Growing up, I never stopped sketching, designing and planning, so it was only natural for me to pursue a career in architecture.

Megan Prittsi_am_epic

Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals – Matthew Pultorak, Assoc AIA

“Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals” is an eight-part series that will be published on the AIA NJ blog over the course of the month of October, AIA Emerging Professionals Month. In this series, our young professionals will chronicle the personal stories of how they were attracted to become architects — and how architecture inspires them.EPiC_Pultorak

A day at the beach

I grew up in Canarsie, Brooklyn, so for much of my childhood I played on asphalt and concrete. (There was also an occasional patch of dirt, which was invariably sprouting weeds). Finding refuge from the bustle of the busy city was rare, so my family would take fairly regular trips to the beach to alleviate the stress and wear of the city lifestyle. Although we didn’t frequent it as often as I would have liked, the beach would influence my creative side in a number of ways. As a creative professional, I look back on those trips and wonder if they had an influence on my decision to pursue a career in architecture.

The beach is a place where all five senses can be evoked, which can cause some sensory overload in a young child. All of the new feelings I experienced on the waterfront caused me to see my surroundings differently. What was a nice place for most people to lounge became my new site for childhood  construction as I designed the most intricate sand castles any architect could conjure up.

You learn about everything in life through experience, and anyone who has built a sand castle can tell you about the factors you must take into account: the wetness of the sand, proximity to the water, where the sun is coming from, if there are other people walking on your “site” and how you have to redirect the ocean water as the tide came in.

Dealing with all of these concerns, unbeknownst to me, was my first experience solving an architectural problem. The end goal was always to create the largest, most intricate sand castle, but in order to complete the project, all the other problems had to be addressed. These small details can really help a young mind develop their problem solving abilities, and from it arises a heightened sense of creativity.

While most people see the beach as a relaxing way to spend the day, it can also be used by parents as a means of developing future architects. It worked for me!

Matthew Pultorak, Assoc. AIA

AEC Cares at the 2016 AIA National Convention

In this month’s ARCHITECT Magazine, July 2016, pages 52-53 feature the AEC Cares project from the National Convention in Philadelphia. The project was a “blitz-build” renovation of the Philadelphia Athletic Recreation Center. As described on the AEC Cares website: “In 2016, AEC Cares partnered with the Community Design Collaborative to renovate the Philadelphia Athletic Recreation Center. Used by hundreds of children in the Sharswood neighborhood for after school and sports programs, the center was in desperate need of repair and upgrades.” As their sixth annual blitz build, project Philadelphia, as it was dubbed, took place on May 18th, 2016, the day before the 2016 AIA National Convention in Philadelphia. AIA WJ Emerging Professional, Jeffrey Brummer, AIA, was a member of the design team. Jeffrey is located on the far left side of the design team photograph on page 52 (and below).

Visit www.aeccares.com for more information. There are videos on the website highlighting the program.

Story submitted by Mark Barone, AIA, President-Elect of AIA West Jersey

AEC Cares at 2016 AIA Convention One Page

AIANJ EPiC Summer Events

 

 

 

AIANJ_EPiC

ALNNJ + Newark and Suburban + Central Jersey Sections
Mini Golf Outing

Willowbrook Golf Center, Wayne, NJ
August 9, 2016

First ever EPiC Mini Golf Outing!
Meet fellow EP’s, play a few holes and perfect your putt for next year’s outing. Register Here!

 

West Jersey + South Jersey + Jersey Shore Sections
Summer Social & Brewery Tour

Tuckahoe Brewing CompanyAugust, 26 2016

Fun fact: Tuckahoe is part-owned by an architect!  Come meet the owner and other local EPs, tour the facility, and sample the tap selections.

 

 

AIANJ_EPiC_DesignComp

2016 Student Design Competition

Due August 19, 2016
Submission Fee: $25 

For more details and the full competition poster visit our website.

 

EPiC Post-Convention Newsletter

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EPiC Moments at
AIA National Convention 2016

Many of AIA New Jersey Emerging Professionals were able to take advantage of the AIA national convention being in Philadelphia this year, even if they only attended one event.  EPiC put a recap of the convention in the latest newsletter.

97a20cf1-0cff-4f05-b5fe-9fdffa2736e2Join us next year in Orlando, April 27 – 29, 2017

View the Full EPiC Newsletter here.

Get Involved in AIANJ EPiC

red_eagleWe are looking for members who are interested in becoming 2016 Section Directors within our Emerging Professionals Community (EPiC), which consists of architecture school graduates, AIA Associate members, and AIA members licensed for 10 years or less. Our mission is to promote the professional growth of emerging architects and support local communities through advocacy, education, and service. Through consistent communication and coordination between the state committee and local sections throughout New Jersey, EPiC provides programming, events, and service opportunities for our members to have fun while building relationships, developing leadership skills, and increasing emerging professional’s involvement within

the profession.

The Section Director position has a term of one year. Responsibilities of the position include:

– Promote the EPiC mission within your local AIA NJ section
– Attend a monthly teleconference with the state EPiC Committee
– Participation in one or more committees chaired by the state At-Large Directors

As a newly revived community within the AIA, EPiC provides a great opportunity to shape the emerging professional programming at both the section and state level. Such programming includes:

Hill Day: Advocacy training and meetings with New Jersey legislators in Trenton -ARE Seminars: Courses to help you pass the licensing exams
Service Opportunities: Design small impactful projects in local communities
Leadership Training: Improve your skills and promote member involvement

If you are interested in becoming an EPiC Section Director we would like to hear from you.

Please submit a letter of interest by e-mail to [email protected] by January 8, 2016 (500 words). Be sure to include your AIA NJ section in your letter. Although not required, we will accept up to two letters of recommendation (500 words).

We look forward to your interest.

Jessica O’Donnell, AIA

2016 EPiC Chair