Category Archives: Uncategorized

Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! Rowan University Holly Pointe Commons by Erdy McHenry Architecture, LLC wins an AIA NJ Merit Award in the residential category

 

red_eagleHOLLY POINTE COMMONS, ROWAN UNIVERSITY:  GLASSBORO, NJ

Erdy McHenry Rowan U

Holly Pointe Commons is located at the southeast corner of Rowan University’s main campus, bordered by Mullica Hill Road (route 322) and North Main Street. The building includes two interconnected wings joined by study bridges above the ground level. The building is organized along a gradual curve establishing a formal campus oval at the terminus to the existing pedestrian campus greenway. The outer edge of the oval creates a new campus gateway to visitors approaching the university from the east while enhancing student safety. The building is situated with a sensitivity toward the natural landscape and surrounded by a rain garden serving as a visual/physical buffer and an environmentally sensitive approach to water management. A new dining facility anchors the western end of the site, overlooking historic Abbott’s Pond.  Student housing, more than simply a place for students to eat and sleep, offers an opportunity to foster community and lifelong social impact. With that in mind, this 1,415 bed residential program is organized around smaller communities (pods) of 35 to 40 students in a college house experience, providing for the physical and social needs of students. Social and academic development is nurtured and supported throughout the living/learning community by an integrated series of lounges, recreation and laundry facilities encouraging interaction among residents.

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Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! MD Anderson Cancer Center by HDR wins an AIA NJ Honor Award in the built category

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THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS

MD ANDERSON CANCER CENTER

ZAYED BUILDING FOR PERSONALIZED CANCER CARE

HDR Zayed

PREMISE: Architecture as a catalyst to curing cancer.   The design reinterprets the conventional laboratory building typology, and replaces it with a people-centric solution with a nexus of knowledge transfer and discovery at its heart.  The transparency of the design both literally and symbolically sheds light on new ideas that are shared by all.

CONCEPT: The building is articulated into four wings and a central hub. Wings are either office neighborhoods or warehouse labs. Office neighborhoods promote interdisciplinary research, and this co-location of scientists fosters knowledge transfer and idea exchange. The expanse of laboratories allows for flexibility and adaptability over time, and for efficient engineering solutions. The central hub acts as a living room and communal focus for the scientist and faculty. A central communicating stair provides vertical interaction between floors.

PROGRAM: The Zayed Building for Personalized Cancer Care is a 610,000 GSF medical research laboratory building that will house the Institute for Personalized Medicine and the Pancreatic Cancer Center. The facility is designed to accommodate the move by MD Anderson away from a departmental research structure, toward an interdisciplinary structure of programs, centers, and institutes.

ENERGY/ENVIRONMENT: Separation of lab and office allows for independent mechanical systems. Laboratory HVAC equipment has a robust energy reduction and recovery system. (Conserve and Aircuity systems). Wings allow for narrow floor plates promoting views and natural light to occupied spaces.  A condensate water reclamation system for irrigation is being implemented. The glass facades are high-performance, with vertical and horizontal shading systems.

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Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! 93 Reade Street by CTS Group wins an AIA NJ Merit Award in the historic preservation category

93 reade 1red_eagle93 READE STREET, NEW YORK CITY

 

CTS 93 Reade

HISTORICAL NARRATIVE

93 Reade St. is located in New York City’s Tribeca South Historic District.  This 5-story cast iron store and loft building was constructed in 1857 for the Jones family and is among the oldest surviving cast-iron-fronted buildings in New York.  Designed in the Italianate style, the building’s ornate façade is split into four bays at each story.  Bays are emphasized with fluted Corinthian columns while each floor line is emphasized by an ornate dentiled cornice.  On the upper stories, the window openings have flat-head arches with chamfered corners at the second through fourth stories and round arches at the fifth story.  Above the building cornice is a central arched pediment.  The cast iron façade had suffered from a significant lack of maintenance.  Additionally, it had undergone alterations in the form of a fire escape installation around the turn of the century and the original glass eye vault was covered with metal diamond plate with vault doors installed at the two west-most bays.

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Knightsbridge Properties acquired 93 Reade Street in 2011 and proposed an adaptive reuse for residential condominiums with a complete exterior restoration.  The CTS Group was retained by Knightsbridge Properties to prepare design and construction documents for the exterior façade restoration.  Restoration work was completed in 2016.

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FAÇADE RESTORATION

The Project included comprehensive restoration of 93 Reade Street’s 5-story cast iron façade which includes an arched building cornice pediment and 1st-floor storefront cornice.  As in many restorations, the complete extent of the work was not established until the scaffold was erected and the façade was fully surveyed.  However, major damage was apparent in the east and west bays due to settlement at the building’s party walls. Paint was removed from the entire façade using grit blasting and paint removers.  This revealed additional damage which had been obscured by the paint. Sections of the façade were carefully identified, tagged and removed to the restorer’s facility for restoration work.  Restoration included replacement of all missing and severely damaged features.  All the replacements were based on the original building features from which molds for the new castings were made.  All replacement components are cast iron and all new anchors are stainless steel for longevity.  All façade features were surveyed for damage to their supports.  All compromised supporting structure was repaired or replaced.  There were numerous in-situ repairs. These were done to limit wholesale disassembly where possible.  These repairs included work such as “stitching” for crack repair and adding sheet metal cladding at some sill areas to remedy back pitching due to structural settlement. All original cast iron column capitals had been removed from the building.  Rather than replicate the originals (for which no good photographic images existed) the Landmarks Commission approved a design which was modeled on, but not identical to, a typical column capital.  Due to their complexity the capitals were fabricated from GFRC.

Scientific paint analysis was used to determine the original cast iron paint color.  The entire cast iron façade was re-painted based on the analysis.  There is only a limited number of skilled cast iron restoration firms.  We acknowledge the capabilities of Allen Architectural Metals in realizing this successful, high quality, cast iron restoration.

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Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! Olympic Archery Park by ikon.5 wins an AIA NJ Merit Award in the unbuilt category

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red_eagleOlympic Archery Park, Clinton, New Jersey
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Sitting in a bucolic sloping meadow of native tall grasses and stands of black walnuts, Archery Park is a rusting rural shed nestled within old growth landscape of northwest New Jersey to house an indoor Olympic Archery training facility. To mitigate its large 70 meter footprint on this natural site, the building has been carefully integrated with the
topography. Exposed concrete walls of the indoor range retain the sloping land and create a level meadow to the north for an outdoor competition range and a flat grade below for the indoor range.
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The natural slope of the site gently rolls around the indoor range and establishes a landscaped entry court of river birch trees and native grasses. Rough-hewn concrete, regional field stone and corten steel panels harmoniously unite the structure to its natural surroundings. The corten roof overhang, screens and panels allow the sun, over the course of the day, to cast dramatic shadows on the building thus further integrating the structure to its natural condition. Perforated openings in the rusting steel panels sign the function of the building from the adjacent roadway. In
addition to the Olympic-sized indoor training range, the facility houses offices, classrooms and support facilities for archery and hunter education.
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NJ Re-Forum Event Planned

AIA NJ Members…Land Use Law Reform discussion REGISTER TODAY

AIA New Jersey has signed on a part of the MLUL Reform Steering Committee and will be involved in the discussion.  Hope to see you there.

Municipal Land Use Law Re-Forum

Are you a municipal official, planner, developer, land use attorney, architect, or anyone else with an interest in local development who has found themselves frustrated by the ins and outs of the Municipal Land Use Law?  If so, join us for a Re-Forum where our open meeting format will allow participants to shape the agenda on what changes you’d like to see!

 

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AIA NJ Women in Architecture Panel

161020 AIA 97-X2red_eagleAs architects we are called on to provide design solutions to social and economic issues that exist in our communities.  These issues mandate that we are able to understand and reflect the views of the people we represent.  To that end, diversity is vital to architecture, its relevance and the solutions it provides our diverse communities.

According to NCARB, 42 percent of new NCARB Record holders are women, compared to 18 percent of Certificate Holders.  While women remain underrepresented among practitioners, they now represent at least a third of licensure candidates at each stage along the path to licensure.

On the surface, it seems our profession is improving.  However, we need to dig a bit deeper to see the full story.  In 2014, AIA San Francisco’s Equity by Design Committee released a full report, and the statistics were eye-opening.  While 42% of college graduates from programs accredited by the National Architecture Accrediting Board are women, only 28% of architectural staff in firms, 26% of licensed architects and 17% of partners are women.  The truth is we are enrolling more women than ever in college, however far too many are leaving the profession.

Last year at Design Day, AIA NJ asked three women at different stages of their career to talk about the state of women in the profession.   Karen Nichols, FAIA a Partner at Michael Graves; Stacey Ruhle Kliesch, AIA, a sole practitioner and Jaclyn Gazelle, an architectural intern.  Each of them had advice for how to climb the ladder, while still having a work-life balance.  They stressed the necessity for firms to create a work culture that was flexible and rewarding for both the employee and the employer.  Finally, the importance of mentorship both internal and external to a firm and the role AIA can provide in mentoring our next generation of leaders.

 

161020 AIA 94-S        Kim Vierheilig, AIA

Diversity – Women in Architecture Chairperson

Second Vice President

AIA New Jersey

AIA South Jersey EPiC Event

Date:  Thursday, February 9, 2017
Time:  6:00 pm
Location:  Strike Zone Lanes
Egg Harbor City, NJ

Cost:  Free

All Emerging Professionals Invited

RSVP:  Christina Amey, AIA
[email protected]
609-602-6669

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Architecture Firm Uses Holistic Design Approach to Build New James Monroe Elementary School

 

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Edison, NJ – At the start of 2017, students in Edison Township returned “home” for their first day of school in the new James Monroe Elementary School (JMES).  The original school was burned to the ground three years ago after a devastating fire. Local architecture and engineering firm, LAN Associates, worked diligently to fast track the return of students and staff to their school, while they have been temporarily attending class at the former Saint Cecelia’s Catholic School in Iselin.

The two-story, 21st century James Monroe Elementary School, approximately 67,000 sf, was designed using principles of a holistic design approach, where light, flexibility, choice, connection, complexity, and color are direct correlations to enhance student educational achievement. Studies have verified that a holistic design approach can advance a student’s academic progress up to 25% during the course of an academic year.

image023.pngDaylighting is the most important design criteria to a school, as it directly impacts attendance, academic and performance productivity. “We began the building design by performing light studies on all orientations of the building,” says Vice President and Project Architect Kim Vierheilig of LAN Associates. “Maximizing natural light in every learning space was a priority and just as important was providing controls within classroom so educators could easily transform their learning environment, depending on the technology they use during instruction or break out activities.” Continue reading

AIA South Member Meeting

Join us for AIA South Jersey’s next Membership Meeting.
January 24, 2017
The Crab Trap, Somers Point

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South Jersey CANstruction Event

canstructionThe Food Bank of South Jersey to host it’s second annual Canstruction event at Rutgers Camden.  They are looking for architects and engineers to participate.

Get your team together today, design and build a can structure, and help fight hunger.  Find out more information

About the Food Bank of South Jersey

The Food Bank of South Jersey (FBSJ) is based in Pennsauken, New Jersey and it exists to provide an immediate solution to the urgent problem of hunger by providing food to needy people, teaching them to eat nutritiously, and helping them to find sustainable ways to improve their lives. For the past 30 years, the Food Bank has provided relief to struggling families and vulnerable seniors who live in Burlington, Camden, Gloucester and Salem counties.

All of this is made possible because of partners like you. When you donate funds or food to FBSJ, you are making a genuine difference in people’s lives. For that, we say “Thank You!”

Information about Canstruction Pennsauken

February 10 – 22 (Please review the event schedule on the previous page)
Rutgers University, Student Campus Center ● 326 Penn Street ● Camden, NJ

Theme: Food Lovers

Team Next Steps

Your team should designate a Team Captain and Mentor. Thoroughly review the Team Captain Guidebook to become familiar with the Rules and Regulations, Design Principles, and the Design Process.

Teams should be actively procuring the cans of food necessary for a winning structure. The Food Bank has resources to help teams procure cans for use in the build.  See foodbanksj.org for additional information.

Submit Design

Tuesday, January 31: deadline for submitting design sketch, dimensions, structure title & description.

2015 South Jersey Canstruction

CANwit ARH SJ2015

Adams Rehmann & Heggan CAN-Do “Wit”