Category Archives: Uncategorized

Architecture Firm Uses Holistic Design Approach to Build New James Monroe Elementary School

 

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Edison, NJ – At the start of 2017, students in Edison Township returned “home” for their first day of school in the new James Monroe Elementary School (JMES).  The original school was burned to the ground three years ago after a devastating fire. Local architecture and engineering firm, LAN Associates, worked diligently to fast track the return of students and staff to their school, while they have been temporarily attending class at the former Saint Cecelia’s Catholic School in Iselin.

The two-story, 21st century James Monroe Elementary School, approximately 67,000 sf, was designed using principles of a holistic design approach, where light, flexibility, choice, connection, complexity, and color are direct correlations to enhance student educational achievement. Studies have verified that a holistic design approach can advance a student’s academic progress up to 25% during the course of an academic year.

image023.pngDaylighting is the most important design criteria to a school, as it directly impacts attendance, academic and performance productivity. “We began the building design by performing light studies on all orientations of the building,” says Vice President and Project Architect Kim Vierheilig of LAN Associates. “Maximizing natural light in every learning space was a priority and just as important was providing controls within classroom so educators could easily transform their learning environment, depending on the technology they use during instruction or break out activities.” Continue reading

AIA South Member Meeting

Join us for AIA South Jersey’s next Membership Meeting.
January 24, 2017
The Crab Trap, Somers Point

aiasj_meetingjan2017

South Jersey CANstruction Event

canstructionThe Food Bank of South Jersey to host it’s second annual Canstruction event at Rutgers Camden.  They are looking for architects and engineers to participate.

Get your team together today, design and build a can structure, and help fight hunger.  Find out more information

About the Food Bank of South Jersey

The Food Bank of South Jersey (FBSJ) is based in Pennsauken, New Jersey and it exists to provide an immediate solution to the urgent problem of hunger by providing food to needy people, teaching them to eat nutritiously, and helping them to find sustainable ways to improve their lives. For the past 30 years, the Food Bank has provided relief to struggling families and vulnerable seniors who live in Burlington, Camden, Gloucester and Salem counties.

All of this is made possible because of partners like you. When you donate funds or food to FBSJ, you are making a genuine difference in people’s lives. For that, we say “Thank You!”

Information about Canstruction Pennsauken

February 10 – 22 (Please review the event schedule on the previous page)
Rutgers University, Student Campus Center ● 326 Penn Street ● Camden, NJ

Theme: Food Lovers

Team Next Steps

Your team should designate a Team Captain and Mentor. Thoroughly review the Team Captain Guidebook to become familiar with the Rules and Regulations, Design Principles, and the Design Process.

Teams should be actively procuring the cans of food necessary for a winning structure. The Food Bank has resources to help teams procure cans for use in the build.  See foodbanksj.org for additional information.

Submit Design

Tuesday, January 31: deadline for submitting design sketch, dimensions, structure title & description.

2015 South Jersey Canstruction

CANwit ARH SJ2015

Adams Rehmann & Heggan CAN-Do “Wit”

AIA Call For Issues Survey

AIA-NJThe AIA biennial Call for Issues for our federal agenda is currently open, and we are hoping to get as wide participation as possible. This is a chance for all members to weigh in on what issues they want the AIA to bring to Congress in 2017.

This is something that has been done for almost 10 years, and it is perhaps as important as ever to give members the chance to speak out on the AIA’s agenda. This Call for Issues will also appear in AIA Architect, but we wanted to share the survey and the message below directly with our AIA New Jersey stakeholder group.


In a few weeks, a new Congress will take their seats on Capitol Hill and begin debating issues that affect all of us. It’s critical that lawmakers hear from architects and that you be involved in those discussions that affect our profession.

That’s why the AIA has launched its biennial Call for Issues. Through this survey, you can inform the AIA about where you stand on the major issues for architects. Your feedback helps us to prioritize the policies and issues that we will advocate on before Congress and the White House for the next two years. Essentially, your responses shape the AIA’s advocacy agenda.

In the past, your responses to the Call for Issues have led the AIA to advocate for sustainable design policies, financial incentives for healthier and more resilient communities, and policies that reduce unnecessary red tape on architecture firms. Your voice has made the difference.

Make sure your voice is heard: take the Call for Issues survey by December 16, and please feel free to share with other AIA members. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the AIA’s Government Relations and Advocacy team at [email protected].

Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals – Brian Penschow

“Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals” is an eight-part series that will be published on the AIA NJ blog over the course of the month of October, AIA Emerging Professionals Month. In this series, our young professionals will chronicle the personal stories of how they were attracted to become architects — and how architecture inspires them.

epic_penshaw.jpg    Drawing Out My Inner Creativity

I like to joke with people that I came to architecture after trying accounting, anthropology, and archaeology, but that isn’t really true – my career path wasn’t nearly that simple. And while it is true that I played with legos and lincoln logs when I was a child, grew up in and around the beautiful architecture of New York City, and had a poster of the World Trade Center with the 1976 King Kong on my bedroom wall, none of those things inspired me to become an architect or even led me to architecture school.

In grade school, I wanted to be a marine biologist, but I didn’t know how to make a life out of that. (Ironically, my wife found a way; she actually teaches Marine Biology.)

As I grew older, my plans transformed and I was convinced that I would be a patent attorney, as my logic skills and gifts with mathematics and science would help me excel in that field. I planned to get an undergraduate engineering degree, and then go to law school, but none of that worked out. The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry.

While I did enter engineering school at the age of seventeen, I never finished my degree. After bouncing around several different jobs, some of which I considered possible careers, I decided to go back to school and study business, which ended up being a complete disaster. I was good at engineering, but in engineering there is one particular solution to a problem, and there is very limited room for creativity. I found business school very boring, and it’s no exaggeration to say that I was completely lost.

It wasn’t until I took my first class in architecture at my local community college that I finally felt at home. I was willing to work long hours, stay up all night, cry after brutal critiques, and even sacrifice a social life for a discipline that would allow me to use all of my skills and creativity. Architectural school, for the first time, helped me release my inner creativity that was always trying to get out.

My inspiration for becoming an architect, and for producing architecture comes from within. Finding that locus of inspiration within me is the secret to my ambition, my drive, and, in large part, to my success.

Brian Penschow, AIA

NCARB Launches ARE 5.0

The Architect Registration Examination® (ARE®) 5.0 launched November 1, 2016, and incorporates the latest testing technology.

ncarbLearn more at NCARB.com

The next version of the Architect Registration Examination® (ARE®), ARE 5.0, will launch November 1, 2016, incorporating the latest testing technologies and format that more closely aligns with modern practice. The six-division exam will include case studies that simulate real-world practice, and will be offered without a fee increase.

Developed by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), the multi-division exam is taken by all candidates seeking architectural licensure in the United States. As with all licensing exams, the ARE is updated periodically to ensure it continues to test the knowledge and skills necessary for the independent practice of architecture.

To adapt to changes in the profession, ARE 5.0 will incorporate a new division structure and the latest graphic testing methods. The exam content has been reorganized into six divisions, which are designed to reflect the phases of architectural practice—from practice management to construction and evaluation. The new divisions also align with the experience areas of the Architectural Experience Program (AXP), making the licensure process smoother and easier to understand for candidates.

Incorporating the Latest Testing Technology

The new exam will retire vignettes—a graphic question type used in the current version—and incorporate two new question types: hot spots and drag-and-place. ARE 5.0 will also include case studies to assess a candidate’s ability to synthesize multiple pieces of information. Each ARE 5.0 division will feature 80 to 120 questions comprised of these new question types, plus multiple-choice, check-all-that-apply, and fill-in-the-blank questions.

NCARB carefully develops the ARE in conjunction with hundreds of practicing architects who volunteer their time, services, and expertise to write, test, and analyze the exam. The ARE is then reviewed by experts who verify the questions are fair, reliable, and in compliance with national testing standards.

 

2016 AIANJ DESIGN AWARD WINNERS

2016 DESIGN AWARDS WINNERS

MERIT UNBUILT

PROJECT:
Brendan Iribe Center for Computer Science & Innovation
FIRM
HDR 

PROJECT:
Village House
FIRM
Stonewater Architects   

PROJECT:
The Unitarian Church Expansion
FIRM
ikon.5 architects   

     

PROJECT:
Olympic Archery Park
FIRM
ikon.5 architects   

MERIT INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE 


PROJECT:
Guerrilla Fitness
FIRM
Solid and Void   

MERIT BUILT-OPEN

PROJECT:
Pinbright Institute
FIRM
HDR  


PROJECT:
Biotrial North America Headquarters
FIRM
Francis Cauffman   

MERIT HISTORIC PRESERVATION

PROJECT:
93 Reade Street
FIRM
CTS  

MERIT RESIDENTIAL

PROJECT:
Holly Pointe Commons, Rowan University
FIRM
Erdy McHenry Architects  

PROJECT:
Prosepct Avenue House
FIRM
Joseph Hobart Weiss   

 

HONOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION 

 
PROJECT:
Porcelanosa
FIRM
CTS   
 

HONOR BUILT 

 
PROJECT:
NJ Insitute for Food Nutrition and Health
FIRM
              Ballinger         
PROJECT:
MD Anderson Cancer Center
FIRM
HDR  

 

Francis Cauffman Wins AIANJ Award for Biotrial’s North American Headquarters

Annual awards program honors design excellence in New Jersey

NEWARK, NJ–Architecture firm Francis Cauffman has been honored with a Merit Award from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) New Jersey, as part of their 2016 Design Awards. The Merit Award for Built Projects celebrates French contract research company Biotrial’s North American headquarters in Newark, New Jersey’s University Heights Science & Technology Park (UHSTP).

The AIA is a professional organization that builds awareness of the role of architects and architecture in American society. The annual Design Awards bring public and professional recognition to design teams that have made a significant contribution to design excellence in New Jersey.

“Francis Cauffman has a great team that collaborated closely with Biotrial to understand their work and their specific needs for this building,” said James Crispino, President of Francis Cauffman. “Our building embodies Biotrial’s culture and seamlessly integrates it into the urban fabric of Newark.”

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Biotral’s new North American headquarters in Newark.  Photo by Chris Cooper.

 

Francis Cauffman’s team included: Buro Happold (Building Systems Engineer); Thornton Tomasetti (Structural Engineer); Sciame (Construction Manager, Cost Estimator); David Langdon (Cost Estimator); Langan Engineering Services (Site Civil, Traffic, and Landscape Architect); Genova Burns Giantomasi & Webster (Land Use Attorney), Joseph A. Natoli Construction Inc. (General Contractor).

Biotrial’s Design
The 70,000-sq.-ft. building is strategically located in the Park, an urban redevelopment initiative uniting five universities and other biomedical organizations.  The high quality of the building’s design, which expresses Biotrial’s mission, has raised the bar for this redevelopment neighborhood, adding jobs and stimulating growth.

Francis Cauffman designed the building as two interlocking planes, whose materials reflect Biotrial’s values. The rear, private façade is solid black brick with matching mortar, which gives a sense of strength and solidity. In contrast, the front is a fritted glass curtain wall, communicating openness and transparency. The fritting creates movement as the light passes through, while also providing privacy. Inspired by the nature of Biotrial’s work, the designers created a ribbon of metal, suggestive of the fluidity of chemistry, to tie the two planes together. The ribbon forms an entrance canopy on the private side, moves through the building as the lobby ceiling, and reemerges on the public side to create a frame for the vestibule and finally the canopy for services.

Natural light penetrates deeply into the interior through the glass, and through asymmetrical ribbon windows in the brick façade. Inside, the building contains a laboratory, pharmacy, and clinical facilities including a 100-bed unit to conduct trials, corporate and volunteer recruitment office, a café, library, lounge, and gardens. 

DOE Energy Code Training

ENERGY.GOV
Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy
Building Energy Codes Program

TOMORROW:  The Energy Codes Commentator

Daylighting Controls in Commercial Buildings

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program is excited to announce the next event in its Energy Code Commentator training series!

Daylighting Controls in Commercial Buildings

Featuring Rahul Athalye, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Thursday, September 8th at 1pm (eastern)

Registration is now available by clicking the above link!

What’s the Energy Code Commentator?

The DOE Building Energy Codes Program hosts a webinar-based training series called the Energy Code Commentator.  The series spans a variety of special topics of interest to all energy code stakeholders–for both residential & commercial buildings. Events will be held regularly on the second Thursday of each month at 1pm (eastern).  Check out the DOE Building Energy Codes Program training portal for the scheduled lineup and recordings of past events!

If you have suggestions for future topics or speakers, please submit them to [email protected].