Category Archives: Practice Management

Position Available – North Jersey & New York

WSA_Staff_Posting

Architect Position Available – Trenton

Project Architect / Job Captain

Employer: Clarke Caton Hintz

Location: Trenton, NJ, US

 

The firm seeks a project architect / job captain (licensed preferred but not required) with 7 – 10 years experience.  Must be proficient in Autodesk Revit and AutoCAD, with knowledge of AutoCAD Architecture greatly preferred.  Knowledge of 3D modeling software such as SketchUp, Rhino, Lumion and or 3D Studio Max desired.  Must be familiar with Microsoft Office software and familiarity with Adobe Creative Suite programs (Photoshop, Indesign, Illustrator) is a plus.

 

If interested, please visit our employment form website by clicking on the link below and fill out the application.

http://cch-form.weebly.com/architect.html

 

Thank you for your interest.  CCH will contact you shortly.

Position Available – Ocean City

Halliday Architects is a boutique architectural firm in Ocean City, New Jersey specializing in custom residential, commercial and interior design projects. Halliday Architects is currently seeking a studio designer and project captain to join their team.

Description:
Architectural firm is seeking a dynamic, talented, highly motivated Designer with 2-5 years of experience to join our expanding Ocean City, NJ office. Our casual yet professional, energetic and collaborative office environment offers great growth potential for motivated individuals who are looking to advance their careers. We pride ourselves in guiding our clients through a complete design process, from initial concept to finished construction.

Halliday Architects is looking for a professional individual with the following skills:

• Excellent AutoCAD and Adobe Creative Suite skills
• 3d modeling and rendering is a plus
• Skills in client communications, contract documentation, project scheduling, team leadership, building design, technical detailing, consultant coordination, construction administration
• Must be able to work on multiple projects at once
• PC platform
• Enjoys a collaborative work environment and has good interpersonal skills.

Interested candidates please send a cover letter, resume and work samples by e-mail in a PDF format to [email protected]

NJ Architectural Firm Positions Available

The following positions are available, qualified candidates please inquire directly to the firm below:

Project Architect

Northern NJ Architectural firm has immediate opening for a Project Manager position.
Min. 5 years experience in Multi Family and Commercial projects in NY, NJ & CT.
License required. NYC Experience preferred.
Successful candidate must be self motivated, able to work independently and/or as part of a team.
Proficiency in AutoCAD, Revit and Microsoft Office is required.
Forward resume and salary requirements for consideration.

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Draftsman/Junior Architect

Northern NJ Architectural firm has immediate opening for a Drafting Position.
Min. 5 years experience in Multi Family and Commercial projects.
Successful candidate must be self motivated, able to work independently and/or as part of a team.
Proficiency in AutoCAD, Revit and Microsoft Office is required.
Forward resume and salary requirements for consideration.

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Marco A. Neves, AIA, NCARB
Neves Architecture & Design, LLC
582 Kearny Avenue, 2nd Floor
Kearny, New Jersey 07032
Tel. 201.246.7979
Fax. 201.246.0235
E-Mail: [email protected]

WORKING WITH THE MEDIA – Personal Engagement

AIA-NJOur previous installments of “Working with the Media” have discussed ways in which you, in a personal or professional context, can begin to build a bridge with the editorial staff of your local publications. This included some strategies as to how to introduce yourself (and your expertise) to the outlet, along with a brief guide for writing an effective letter to the editor and a primer on packaging newsworthy projects into a formal press release to send to journalists.

In all of these installments, we were mainly addressing “proactive” media outreach, which is to say, outreach initiated by an architect specifically designed to garner publicity.

However, in certain cases, you may be spurred to engage with a journalist because of comments or omissions that he has previously made. While we touched on “letters to the editor” – letters written to be published in the paper – in a previous piece, we’d also like to discuss a somewhat different concept: Engaging specifically with the journalist by writing a personal note directly to him or her (as opposed to “letters to the editor,” which are targeted at the broader public).

It’s a scenario that you’ve likely encountered many times: The local paper runs a feature article about a building and includes comments from the developer – but there is no reference to the fact that there was an architect on the project that conceptualized the design and drew the blueprints. While this frustrating scenario is all too common, if approached properly, it can be an opportunity to educate the reporter so that the same mistake isn’t repeated in the future.

Before we discuss how to approach the journalist, it’s important to recognize several likely facts about the omission:

Reporter specialty – In many cases, the reporter is not particularly familiar with architecture – or even real estate development. The editorial staffs are shrinking at most newspapers, and reporters are frequently tasked with covering several beats. In some cases, the offending article may be the only one the reporter writes relating to architecture or real estate over a period of several weeks or months.
Communicated information – Many real estate developers provide reporters with press releases, which include much of the basic information about their projects. Frequently, reporters write stories based nearly entirely upon the press release – including mention of the architect if she is mentioned in the press release, but omitting it otherwise.

What both of these facts mean is that the reporter was probably not omitting the architect’s identity deliberately; chances are that he or she simply doesn’t understand the architect’s importance. With this in mind, the best practices for this sort of letter are clear:

Choose judiciously – While every building has an architect, that doesn’t mean that every article written about a structure without reference to its architect should turn into a letter. Instead of flooding the inbox of a reporter after every offending article, only send a note when the omission is flagrant, e.g. if the building’s architecture is particularly noteworthy, or if the article focused significantly on the building’s design.
Keep it educational – The article is already published, so the goal is to explain to the reporter why the architect is an integral part of the building process, so architects are included in future articles. Because most journalists have limited knowledge of architecture, be as detailed as possible, including not just the legal requirement of having an architect but the specific value and creativity that the architect brought to that particular building, what is architecturally unique and/or how it promotes safety.
Offer to have a follow-up call – In addition to the obvious benefits of having a broader discussion on local architecture if the reporter accepts the offer, the offer itself drills home the point that you’re not looking to criticize the reporter because of an error they made; rather, you’re looking to provide them with your expertise to enable them to write more knowledgeably in the future.

Note that there are also several ways you can proactively go about making sure that you are given credit when your projects are covered in the media:

Create a requirement in your contract: Including a requirement that all project publicity will mention your firm is one way to guarantee that your participation is acknowledged in the developer’s press materials.
Provide a description of the project to your client: Giving your client an architectural perspective on the project will not only help them in their media outreach, but it will also ensure a proper description of the architectural elements of a project. In doing so, it is natural to include a mention of your firm in the description.
Draft your own press release: Now that you know how to compose your own press release from a previous installment of “working with the media”, you may be able to “take the lead” on announcing the project, which means that you can control what specific details are being shared with the reporters. If the developer is looking to do media outreach, they may be open to collaborating with you on the press release, which would also mean that you will have at least some control of what details are being sent to journalists.

For more suggestions, refer to AIA Best Practices – Getting Good Press on the web at http://www.aia.org. Please note this is a password protected, member only website. Therefore, we cannot provide a direct link to the site for you. But you can find it under Practicing Architecture; Best Practices; Part 2 – Firm Management; Chapter 6: Marketing and Business Development. You might also find a lot of other beneficial material in this area of the website. You can also find samples of other quick responses here.

If you would like to read the previous articles in this series, please see the following links:

Delivering Your Message In An Interview

Building Relationships

Writing a Letter to the Editor

Composing a Press Release

Press Release Boilerplates

Shlomo Morgulis
Account Executive
Beckerman PR Real Estate Team

Bruce D. Turner, AIA
Co-Chair, AIA New Jersey Public Awareness Committee

Architect Business Development Summit Scholarships

Free Business Development Scholarship for AIA NJ Small Firm Principals
There is an opportunity for 2 members of AIA NJ to get a free scholarship to the upcoming Architect Business Development Summit in NYC on April 7 + 8 (read more here: http://architectresources.org/qoe8).
Attending this event will help you acquire the skills you need to help your firm prosper, and it is specifically tailored for smaller firms who might lack a dedicated marketing team.
Scholarship includes free registration for the 2-day event ($997 value)
Here is the link to apply for a scholarship: http://architectresources.org
The deadline for applications is March 24, 2016.
Use sponsor code: AIANJ
 arch-business-dev-summit-2016
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2015 NJ Code Update

AIAeagle_2016On September 21, 2015, NJ formally adopted the 2015 ICC series of codes including the International Building Code (IBC), the International Residential Code (IRC), the International Mechanical Code (IMC), the International Fuel Gas Code (IFGC) and the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) along with the National Electric Code NFPA 70-2014.

As with all NJ subcode revisions there is a 6 month grace period in which the design professional can chose to use either the current or previous version of the code. The grace period is about to expire, and all applications submitted for plan review after March 21, 2016 will be required to use the 2015 codes.

The National Standard Plumbing Code 2015,  was not adopted until January 4 2016, so the option to use the previous version of the plumbing subcode only, is still available until July 6, 2016.

This is the first code update since 2009 and it comes with literally hundreds of changes.

Below is a small sample of some of the significant changes to the code.

  • Wind born debris regions that trigger the requirement for impact resistant glazing have been modified. This will affect many buildings along the NJ Shore.
  • Institutional uses, including medical offices & assisted living facilities will be affected by the addition of “Occupancy Conditions.”
  • Most of the Barrier Free Subcode requirements have been moved to Chapter 11 of IBC.
  • Egress requirements from mezzanines have been changed.
  • New sprinkler requirements for buildings with assembly occupancies on roofs.
  • New requirements for low level “Exit” signs in some occupancies.

Visit the NJ Department of Community Affairs (DCA) home page for a complete list of code adoptions with links to full versions of the codes online. http://www.state.nj.us/dca/divisions/codes/codreg/

Robert Longo, AIA
AIANJ Codes & Standards Chair

Maplewood Library RFQ

On February 19, 2016 Maplewood Memorial Library issued a Request for Qualifications (RFQ): Architectural Services for Conceptual Design.   The RFQ and related information can be found on the Maplewood Library website at  Maplewood Library: Building for the Future.   

Find out the latest on our plans to renovate and improve the Maplewood Memorial Library.

Request for Qualifications (RFQ): Architectural Services for Conceptual Design

Time and Place for Submission of Responses:
Respondents must submit one (1) original and nine (9) copies, including copies of all forms and attachments, to Sarah Lester, Director, Maplewood Memorial Library, 51 Baker Street, Maplewood, NJ  07040, on or before 4:00 p.m. on April 4, 2016.

Pre-Submittal Information Conference:  11am on Wednesday, March 9, 2016 at the Maplewood Memorial Library, 51 Baker Street, Maplewood, NJ 07040.

In response to requests by potential RFQ respondents, there will be walk throughs of the library at 2 pm on  March 2nd,  3 pm on March 3rd and11 am on Thursday, March 10th.  If any other potential RFQ respondent would like to do a walk through the building on one of these dates or another date, please make a request to Sarah Lester, Library Director [email protected].

NJIT Design Showcase 2016

 

Register today for Design Showcase 2016!

New Jersey Institute of Technology
 FEBRUARY 2016 
 

College of Architecture and Design

Design Showcase 2016 – Our 10th Year!

Celebrating CoAD’s continued commitment to 

Students and Industry Professionals

 

 Thursday, April 7, 2016

Weston Hall Gallery

 

An evening featuring keynote speaker James Tichenor ’99, student design awards, live music and a cocktail reception. 

Registration with dedicated professional networking session for all guests begins at 4:30 pm.

 

To register, sponsor and for more information visit link:
Design Showcase 2016

or contact Tracy Bermeo at [email protected] or at 973-596-5531

 

Thank you!  

We look forward to seeing you on April 7th!

 

 

What Architects Need to Know About Responsible Charge

by David Del Vecchio, AIA
AIANJ Legislative & Government Affairs Chair  (L&GA)

A2023 was signed into law in New Jersey on January 11, 2016.  The bill revises the definition of “responsible charge” as it pertains to licensed professional engineers and land surveyors.  AIA New Jersey requested amendments to include architects along with the professional engineers and land surveyors included in the original language.

The original bill sought to revise the standard of supervision a professional engineer or land surveyor must give to individuals whose work affects the quality and competence of the professional services of the building design professional.  More specifically, the bill would change the definition of “responsible charge” as it pertains to architecture, engineering, landscape architecture, or land surveying work.

The bill defines “responsible charge” to mean the providing of oversight by a competent building design professional by means calculated to provide personal direction to, and quality control over, the efforts of subordinates of the licensee which directly and materially affects the quality and competence of the professional services rendered by the licensee.

The bill amends a section of law that currently lists various acts or practices engaged in by a licensed closely allied professionals that are deemed to be acts or practices in which that licensee has not rendered proper supervision.

The bill removes from this enumerated list of acts or practices contained in current law reference to the regular and continuous absence from principal office premises from which professional services are rendered, except for performance of field work or presence in a field office maintained exclusively for a specific project.

AIA New Jersey Legislative Committee was successful in having the bill amended to revise the definition of “responsible charge,” as it relates to engineers and architects, to mean the provision of regular and effective supervision by a competent professional engineer or architect, as the case may be, who shall provide personal direction to, and quality control over, the efforts of subordinates of the licensee which directly and materially affects the quality and competence of the professional services rendered by the licensee.

The amendments specify that a licensee engaged in the rendering of a limited, cursory or perfunctory review of plans or projects in lieu of providing sufficient direction to, and quality control over, the efforts of subordinates of the licensee shall be deemed not to have rendered regular and effective supervision.  Plan stamping is still plan stamping.

So while the bill allows building design professionals to provide personal direction and quality control to staff not located in the same office location, it maintains the prohibition Plan Stamping.

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