Category Archives: Historic Resources

Information of Historic Resources and Historic Preservation.

AIA-NJ’s Design Conference Registration Opens

Registration for AIA-NJ’s Annual Design Conference is Open 

Celebrating architecture and design in New Jersey, AIA-NJ has announced that the organization will host its annual Design Conference at the Berkeley Hotel in Asbury Park, N.J., on Sept. 13, 2012, from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.  Registration is online, reserve your spot today.

Stephen Kieran, FAIA, AIA-NJ 2012 Design Conference keynote speaker

This year, the event will feature three speaking sessions, which will be interspersed with a boardwalk redevelopment tour of Asbury Park as well as a lunch networking reception. Following a keynote session, there will be a final reception featuring the announcement of this year’s AIA-NJ Design Award winners.

The speakers will be Frank Grauman, FAIA, senior partner of Bohlin, Cywinski & Jackson, an architectural firm based in Philadelphia, Pa., and William Loose, AIA, who is also a partner in the firm; Charles Renfro, AIA, partner of Diller, Scofido & Renfro, an architectural firm based in New York City; and Stephen Kieran, FAIA, senior partner of KieranTimberlake Architects, based in Philadelphia, Pa., who is the keynote speaker.

The Design Awards are meant to bring public and professional recognition to architectural projects that exhibit design excellence in New Jersey. AIA-NJ is currently accepting award submissions, with the deadline to submit the entry form and fee being Aug. 29, 2012.

To register online, please visit www.aia-nj.org. Questions may be addressed to Laura Slomka at 609-393-5690 or lslomka@njpsi.com.

For more information and a detailed schedule, please visit http://blog.aia-nj.org/2012/06/26/design-2012-save/.

Keep Preservation Programs in the Transportation Bill

AIACongress is currently debating legislation to reform federal transportation laws, and unless they hear from us, there is a chance that historic preservation programs will be eliminated.

Some members of Congress have proposed eliminating the Transportation Enhancement program, which enables states and communities to use a small portion of their federal transportation dollars on projects such as the preservation of historic transportation facilities, rehabilitation and operation of historic transportation buildings, and the preservation of abandoned railway corridors for use as pedestrian or bicycle trails.

Eliminating the Transportation Enhancement program will not save a dime of taxpayer money, as the funds will be shifted to roadbuilding or other purposes, but it would end a successful program that saves historic spaces, enhances communities, and creates jobs.

The AIA is working with a broad coalition to maintain Congressional support for these programs. Please act now to tell Congress not to eliminate these programs. For more information on Transportation Enhancement programs, click here.
Click Here to Contact Your Member of Congress NOW

Sincerely,

Paul Mendelsohn, Assoc. AIA
Vice President, Government and Community Relations

A Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

To the Editor:

Jon Gertner’s recent story (True Innovation, Sunday, February 26, 2012) about his soon to be published book, The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation, was welcomed by those of us who have been advocating for the retention and reuse of the Eero Saarinen designed Bell Labs in Holmdel, NJ. Mr. Gertner’s story highlights the accomplishments of Bell Labs’ far-reaching technological prowess while it establishes the context of the Holmdel facility as an important architectural model.

The innovations were rooted in open-minded thinking and the sharing of knowledge, all supported by architecture that itself was flexible, new and original. The Holmdel facility featured aspects now commonplace, including the first uses of mirrored curtainwall, vast open floor plans and an overall rational plan that extended out to include the park-like setting of 472 acres designed by Sasaki Walker and Associates. Bell Labs is a product of our unique American character and the expression of how exceptional architecture fosters and embodies technological ingenuity.

Bell Labs Holmdel, completed in 1962, has been determined eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and the was subject of a recent award winning Charrette sponsored by AIA-New Jersey, Docomomo-NY/TriState, and Preservation NJ. Publication of this book and recent news that a prospective buyer has emerged for the two million square foot office and research facility present an excellent time to renew our call to Holmdel Township and to Alcatel-Lucent to work together to find a way that will assure the site’s future.

Sincerely,
Michael Calafati

Michael Calafati, AIA
Chair, Historic Resources Committee, AIA-New Jersey
March 1, 2012

Michael Calafati is principal of Michael Calafati Architect, LLC, Cape May, NJ and co-editor of the Bell Labs Charrette: A Sustainable Future.

DCA & NJ HISTORIC TRUST LAUNCH CAPITAL NEEDS SURVEY FOR NEW JERSEY HISTORIC SITES

Survey Will Help Identify Repair, Restoration, and Improvement Needs of Historic Places  

TRENTON, N.J. – New Jersey Department of Community Affairs (DCA) Acting Commissioner Richard E. Constable III today announced the launch of a new Capital Needs Survey that will collect information on the repair, restoration and improvement needs of historic sites throughout the state. The New Jersey Historic Trust, a DCA affiliate, is leading the effort and encourages all publicly owned and nonprofit-managed sites to participate in the survey.  “The Historic Trust recognizes that even our state’s most notable and celebrated historic sites and attractions have significant needs for repairs and improvements, all of which will ultimately serve the public better,” said Acting Commissioner Constable. “This survey will help the Trust identify those specific needs and begin to quantify the costs associated with making these historic buildings relevant and useful in their communities.”  The survey will begin on February 1, 2012, and run until May 1, 2012. It will pose questions about a building’s use, repair needs, projected repair costs, and, if appropriate, its participation in heritage tourism development.  A “historic building” is defined as a structure that was built more than 50 years ago, or prior to 1962.  A property does not need to be listed on the state or national Register of Historic Places to be included in the survey. Buildings that may participate include: historic residences, farmsteads, factories, theaters, museums, houses of worship, fire houses, libraries, railroad stations, schools and more. Buildings owned by private homeowners or businesses are not eligible for this survey.  This is the second Capital Needs Survey in the State of New Jersey. The first, in 1990, identified capital needs of more than $400 million. The results of the survey helped garner public support for four historic preservation bond referendums in the 1990s, and sustain historic preservation funding from the Garden Sate Preservation Trust from 2000 to 2010.  This year, the Historic Trust is hoping to attract more participants by making the survey accessible online.  “By using the Internet and making the survey easy to complete and submit, we hope to reach as many historic site stewards as possible,” said Historic Trust Executive Director Dorothy Guzzo. “The broader the participation, the better picture we will have of the state’s real need for historic preservation funding. “  Upon completion of the survey, the data will be analyzed and the capital needs of the state’s historic properties will be tallied and published by the end of the year. The Historic Trust will use the information to prioritize and/or revise criteria for its program, as well as to alert the community to begin thinking about their future stewardship needs.  “The Capital Needs Survey will provide New Jersey with important financial data to illustrate the continuing need for investment in the state’s historic resources,” said Historic Trust Chair Chris Perks. “Funding the preservation of existing buildings and structures helps make our communities more sustainable as well as enjoyable.”  The Historic Trust administers grants from the Garden State Historic Preservation Trust Fund, the NJ Cultural Trust Capital Preservation Grant Program, the “Discover NJ History” License Plate Fund and the 1772 Foundation Grant Program for New Jersey. Since 1990, the Historic Trust has awarded more than $134 million in matching preservation grants to sites in every county of the state.  Established in 1967, the New Jersey Historic Trust is the only nonprofit historic preservation organization in New Jersey created by state law. Its mission is to advance historic preservation in New Jersey for the benefit of future generations through education, stewardship and financial investment programs that saves the state’s heritage and strengthens its communities.  For more information on the New Jersey Historic Trust, please visit http://www.njht.org. For more information on the Capital Needs Survey, log on to http://fs19.formsite.com/NJHT/CapitalNeedsSurvey/index.html.

DCA & NJ HISTORIC TRUST LAUNCH CAPITAL NEEDS SURVEY FOR NEW JERSEY HISTORIC SITES

Survey Will Help Identify Repair, Restoration, and Improvement Needs of Historic Places

 

TRENTON, N.J. – New Jersey Department of Community Affairs (DCA) Acting Commissioner Richard E. Constable III today, January 31, 2012 announced the launch of a new Capital Needs Survey that will collect information on the repair, restoration and improvement needs of historic sites throughout the state. The New Jersey Historic Trust, a DCA affiliate, is leading the effort and encourages all publicly owned and nonprofit-managed sites to participate in the survey.

“The Historic Trust recognizes that even our state’s most notable and celebrated historic sites and attractions have significant needs for repairs and improvements, all of which will ultimately serve the public better,” said Acting Commissioner Constable. “This survey will help the Trust identify those specific needs and begin to quantify the costs associated with making these historic buildings relevant and useful in their communities.”

The survey will begin on February 1, 2012, and run until May 1, 2012. It will pose questions about a building’s use, repair needs, projected repair costs, and, if appropriate, its participation in heritage tourism development.

A “historic building” is defined as a structure that was built more than 50 years ago, or prior to 1962. A property does not need to be listed on the state or national Register of Historic Places to be included in the survey. Buildings that may participate include: historic residences, farmsteads, factories, theaters, museums, houses of worship, fire houses, libraries, railroad stations, schools and more. Buildings owned by private homeowners or businesses are not eligible for this survey.

This is the second Capital Needs Survey in the State of New Jersey. The first, in 1990, identified capital needs of more than $400 million. The results of the survey helped garner public support for four historic preservation bond referendums in the 1990s, and sustain historic preservation funding from the Garden Sate Preservation Trust from 2000 to 2010.

This year, the Historic Trust is hoping to attract more participants by making the survey accessible online.

“By using the Internet and making the survey easy to complete and submit, we hope to reach as many historic site stewards as possible,” said Historic Trust Executive Director Dorothy Guzzo. “The broader the participation, the better picture we will have of the state’s real need for historic preservation funding. “

Upon completion of the survey, the data will be analyzed and the capital needs of the state’s historic properties will be tallied and published by the end of the year. The Historic Trust will use the information to prioritize and/or revise criteria for its program, as well as to alert the community to begin thinking about their future stewardship needs.

“The Capital Needs Survey will provide New Jersey with important financial data to illustrate the continuing need for investment in the state’s historic resources,” said Historic Trust Chair Chris Perks. “Funding the preservation of existing buildings and structures helps make our communities more sustainable as well as enjoyable.”

The Historic Trust administers grants from the Garden State Historic Preservation Trust Fund, the NJ Cultural Trust Capital Preservation Grant Program, the “Discover NJ History” License Plate Fund and the 1772 Foundation Grant Program for New Jersey. Since 1990, the Historic Trust has awarded more than $134 million in matching preservation grants to sites in every county of the state. Established in 1967, the New Jersey Historic Trust is the only nonprofit historic preservation organization in New Jersey created by state law. Its mission is to advance historic preservation in New Jersey for the benefit of future generations through education, stewardship and financial investment programs that saves the state’s heritage and strengthens its communities.

For more information on the New Jersey Historic Trust, please visit http://www.njht.org. For more information on the Capital Needs Survey, log on to http://fs19.formsite.com/NJHT/CapitalNeedsSurvey/index.html.

Leicester B. Holland Prize Call for Entries

2012 Holland Proze Poster

The Leicester B. Holland Prize is an annual competition that recognizes the best single-sheet measured drawing of an historic building, site, or structure prepared by an individual(s) to the standards of the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), Historic American Engineering Record (HAER), or the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS). The prize is supported by the Paul Rudolph Trust, Architectural Record, a magazine of the American Institute of Architects (AIA); and the Center for Architecture, Design & Engineering in the Library of Congress, and administered by the Heritage Documentation Programs of the National Park Service (HABS/HAER/HALS/CRGIS). The prize honors Leicester B. Holland (1882-1952), FAIA, chairman of the AIA’s Committee on Historic Buildings, head of the Fine Arts Division of the Library of Congress and first curator of the HABS collection, a co-founder of the HABS program in the 1930s, and the first chair of the HABS Advisory Board.

 

The prize is intended to increase awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of historic sites, structures, and landscapes throughout the United States while adding to the permanent HABS, HAER and HALS collection at the Library of Congress, and to encourage the submission of drawings among professionals and students. The prize is also intended to reinvigorate the art of architectural delineation and composition in the tradition established by the Ecole des Beaux Arts. Beaux Arts methodology embraced the study and drawing of historic buildings as a crucial component of architectural education, providing an opportunity for young architects to gain an understanding of the principles of design and construction. Additionally, it was a means through which architects mined historic buildings for architectural motifs to be used in their restoration and new design projects. By requiring only a single sheet, the competition challenges the delineator to capture the essence of the site through the presentation of key features that reflect its historic and its architectural, landscape architectural or engineering significance. The Holland Prize competition is open to all those interested, regardless of experience or professional background.

Entry deadline: June 1, 2012

Architectural Record magazine will publish the winning drawing, and the winner will receive a $1000 cash prize and a certificate of recognition. Merit awards will also be given.

For more information on the competition go to:

http://www.nps.gov/history/hdp/competitions/holland.htm

NJ Future Seeks Nominations for 2012 Smart Growth Awards

Do you know of an innovative project, plan or initiative that deserves to be honored for bringing smart growth ideals to light? Consider nominating it for a 2012 Smart Growth Award.

Winners will be selected by jury and recognized at New Jersey Future’s annual Smart Growth Awards celebration on June 7, 2012 at the Newark Club in Newark.

The Smart Growth Awards celebration is considered one of the state’s premier networking events and an occasion that draws wide media attention and an attendance of more than 300 development industry professionals, as well as local, regional, and state leaders.

Since 2002, New Jersey Future has honored smart planning and development in New Jersey through this annual event. The awards help promote our mission to secure economic opportunity, community vitality and quality of life for all New Jerseyans.

For inspiration, check out the previous winners.

Guidelines and nomination form are available in PDF and Word formats. Deadline for submissions is Friday, February 3, 2012.

BELL LABS HOLMDEL: ARCHITECTS AND PERSERVATION GROUPS REACT TO THE REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

The coalition of organizations advocating for the preservation of the former Bell Labs building and landscape have been anticipating the proposed zoning changes from Holmdel Township for most of this year. A multidisciplinary Charrette held three ago years by AIA-New Jersey, Docomomo US/NY Tri-State and Preservation NJ developed design approaches for the preservation and sympathetic reuse of the internationally significant modernist landmark. “The Bell Labs site poses many challenges adapting it sensitively to new uses while protecting the landscape,” said Michael Calafati, AIA, of AIA-New Jersey.

“We are heartened to see that Holmdel is acknowledging preservation of the building as a goal in the public’s interest. Permitting new and mixed uses will help achieve this. This news is in keeping with the Charrette’s recommendations,” he added. The Eero Saarinen-designed building (1957-1962) and Sasaski-Walker designed landscape have already been deemed eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. Accordingly, the site’s overall importance is based on the building and the landscape as a unified entity. The preservation groups welcome much of the Redevelopment Plan’s provisions but an area of concern remains the potential impact to the imposing landscape. “The architect and landscape architect worked collaboratively to create a unique and singular vision for Bell Labs. There is no distinction between the jewel and the setting – it is all of one piece,” said Nina Rappaport of Docomomo New York/Tri-State. “We hope that initial efforts will be placed on preserving and adapting the building so that any impact on the landscape can be considered carefully.” While the groups acknowledge the potential for a change in use, the landscape could be preserved for passive recreation, especially considering the setting and the environmental impact.

The building, shuttered in July 2007 and listed for sale since, is included on Preservation New Jersey’s list of the state’s Most Endangered Historic Places. The coalition that organized the Bell Labs Charrette and published the final report includes the NJ Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA-NJ), Preservation New Jersey (PNJ), the National Trust for Historic Preservation, DOCOMOMO-US (DOcumentation and COnservation of buildings and sites of the MOdern MOvement), the DOCOMOMO US/NY Tri-State Chapter, the Recent Past Preservation Network, The Cultural Landscape Foundation, and the NJ Conservation Foundation. The charrette report is available for downloading by clicking here.

The Holmdel Township Committee will hold a public hearing December 20, 2011, on the proposed ordinance to adopt the redevelopment plan. The redevelopment plan is available for download by clicking here, and following the link either to the redevelopment plan summary or full redevelopment plan.

For more information, contact:

Michael Calafati, AIA
AIA New Jersey
609-884-4922
michael@calafati.com

Nina Rappaport
DOCOMOMO US/NY Tri-State
212-531-3472
Rappaporthall@sprintmail.com

Stephanie Cherry-Farmer
Preservation New Jersey
609-392-6409
info@preservationnj.org

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts by Frank Furness

By Frank Cunha III, AIA
Editorial Writer

Ever since I first heard about Frank Heyling Furness (1839–1912) during an Architectural history class I have been fascinated by his work. I made several trips to Philadelphia to see his work and I am familiar with his Emlen Physick Estate in historic Cape May, New Jersey. Although at first glance his work appears to be traditional Victorian, his body of work trandscends any particular style. I consider Furness the first Deconstructivist (or Pre- Post-Modernist) the way he melded different styles to create his work. Below I am featuring his most well known and preserved work, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts located in Philadelphia, which is one of the few projects that have been preserved.

Read the rest of the article on the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

National Park Service Starts Architectural Drawing Competition

Sharpen your pencils, the National Park Service has a $1,000 prize at stake in a new competition for architectural artists who create drawings of historic buildings.

“Drawings from the hands of skilled craftsmen are valuable tools when it comes to the protection of America’s treasured historic structures,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “They are a permanent record of our nation’s built environment, created with the precision needed to restore or repair these places of our past. This competition will reinvigorate this specialty and encourage the development of the talents it requires.”

The Historic American Buildings Survey, called HABS, began in 1934. The National Park Service has been its only home. The architectural drawings, large format photographs and written histories HABS uses to document historic structures are housed at the Library of Congress and are available to the public online. More than 40,000 historic structures and sites have been documented.

The competition and its prize are named for Leicester B. Holland (1882-1952), the co-founder of the Historic American Building Survey program and head of the Fine Arts Division of the Library of Congress.

Catherine Lavoie leads the Historic American Buildings Survey today. “The Holland Prize is intended to increase awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of historic sites, structures, and landscapes throughout the United States while adding to our permanent collection. By requiring only a single sheet, the competition challenges the student or professional to capture the essence of the site through the presentation of key features that reflect its historic and its architectural, landscape architectural or engineering significance,” Lavoie said.

Drawings of historic buildings are a crucial component of architectural education. Lavoie said they provide opportunity for young architects to gain an understanding of the principles of design and construction and in addition to their use for restoration work, contribute to new design projects.

The competition will be administered by the National Park Service’s Heritage Documentation Programs. Entries of an historic building, site, or structure including engineering sites and historic landscapes must be prepared by an individual or individuals to standards established by HABS or its sister programs the Historic American Engineering Record (HAER), or the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS).

In addition to the cash, the winning drawing will be published in Architectural Record magazine.

May 31 is the deadline for entry form submissions and June 30 is the deadline for submission of completed entries. To download the Holland Prize entry form, competition rules and recommendations visit: http://www.nps.gov/history/hdp/competitions/holland.htm

The prize is supported by the Paul Rudolph Trust, Architectural Record, a magazine of the American Institute of Architects (AIA); and theCenter for Architecture, Design & Engineering in the Library of Congress, and the National Park Service.

The Holland prize joins the Peterson Prize in drawing competitions. Each year the HABS/HAER/HALS programs offer students employment and training opportunities. Please visit http://www.nps.gov/hdp/jobs/summer.htm for student employment information andhttp://www.nps.gov/hdp/jobs/peterson.htm for information about the Peterson Prize.

And be sure to visit us on Facebook with professionals, friends, alumni, project sponsors, and others interested in our work of recording America’s architectural, engineering and landscape heritage through measured drawings, written historical reports and large-format photography.”

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