Category Archives: Historic Resources

Information of Historic Resources and Historic Preservation.

William J. Martin, AIA on Pittsburgh’s NPR Radio

When the co-chair of the AIA NJ Public Awareness committee is a guest on NPR radio, we don’t hit the snooze bar.

Take a listen as William J Martin, AIA, shares the real history of the stray toilet in your grandma’s basement.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF TED ZELLERS

http://wesa.fm/post/architect-offers-explanation-pittsburgh-s-basement-toilets-and-it-s-not-what-you-think#stream/0

Renovated Midcentury Modern Eero Saarinen Landmark Hill College House Reopens

Designed by renowned Finnish American architect Eero Saarinen and built in 1960, Hill College House at the University of Pennsylvania has undergone a 15-month, $80 million, LEED Gold-targeted renovation. The internationally recognized landmark will reopen to 500 student residents later this month.

The five-story, 195,000-sf brick residence has undergone a comprehensive renovation, preserving Saarinen’s revolutionary design vision for communal living with multiple public spaces at varying physical and social scales. Originally a women’s dormitory, Hill College House features an allegorical entry bridge over a landscaped “moat” and surrounding spiked metal fence. Student lounges and seminar rooms are built around a vast central atrium that overlooks a dining area on the lower level.

“In this complex and challenging renovation, Mills + Schnoering Architects has designed multiple deft interventions that accumulate into a complete refresh of this important building – one that respects and invigorates Saarinen’s design and the community life it so richly fosters,” said University Architect David Hollenberg.

Mills + Schnoering Architects of Princeton, N.J., led the design and construction team. Specialists in historic renovation, the firm previously worked on Saarinen’s Gateway Arch in Saint Louis, Mo.

“Our approach respects the original Saarinen Hill College House design, preserving its legacy,” said Mills + Schnoering Partner-in-Charge, Michael Mills, FAIA. “Our choices were inspired both by the integrity of the architecture and by the contemporary student experience, with a design meant to balance the two in a welcoming, accessible student residence.”

Features of the renovation design include:

  • Expansion of dining facilities by 50 percent, including major kitchen upgrades.
  • Restoration of the iconic “drawbridge” entrance and landscaped “moat.”
  • Removal, restoration, and refitting of over 400 windows.
  • New furniture and finishes designed to echo the building’s midcentury style and reinterpret

    Saarinen’s bold color palette and furnishings.

  • All new MEP systems and the introduction of air-conditioning.
  • Conversion of all bathrooms to individual restrooms and shower rooms.
  • Installation of LED lighting in the center atrium.
  • New elevator and lift to provide accessibility compliance.
  • Perimeter wall insulation, a new roof, and restoration of two outdoor courtyards.

    Project goals included strengthening the sense of community at the heart of Hill College House’s original design and respecting the historic significance of the building’s materials and details, by maintaining as much fabric and design intent as possible while inserting modern systems and amenities.

 

Hill by the Numbers

The renovated facility includes:

  • 261 student rooms: 206 doubles, 41 singles, 11 ADA singles, and 3 RA singles
  • 5 faculty apartments
  • 15 graduate assistant apartments
  • 161 gender-neutral bathrooms
  • 5,750 sf main dining facility
  • 300 main dining facility seats
  • 1,810 sf of private dining
  • 29,505 sf of social spaces
  • 19 atrium lounges
  • 17 corridor lounges

 


About University of Pennsylvania

The University of Pennsylvania is an Ivy League institution with 12 undergraduate, graduate and professional schools in Philadelphia, serving a diverse community of more than 20,000 students from around the world. Ranked consistently among the top 10 universities in the nation, Penn has a longstanding reputation for excellence. For more information, visit http://www.upenn.edu.

About Mills + Schnoering Architects

Mills + Schnoering Architects, LLC (M+Sa) is a full-service architectural firm with work focused on cultural buildings, public buildings, campus planning and design, and the preservation and rehabilitation of historic structures. The firm has a particular interest in the restoration, renovation, and adaptive use of midcentury modern buildings and sites. The Hill College House architectural team was led by Michael Mills, FAIA, Partner in Charge; Michael Schnoering, FAIA, Managing Partner; Alison Baxter, AIA, Project Manager; and Meredith Arms Bzdak, PhD, Interiors Coordinator and Architectural Historian. For more information, visit http://msarchitectsllc.com.

AIA NJ recognizes this NJ State Historic Preservation Office Award winning project designed by HMR Architects of Princeton, NJ

 

rh5The reconstruction of the Nevius Dutch barn at Rockingham is a complete and accurate reconstruction of this threatened building type.  Prior to being dismantled the barn was threatened by neglect.  After being dismantled the barn remained in storage for over a decade until the project started in 2013.  The reconstruction of the barn included re-erecting the repaired frame on a new concrete slab.  The frame was then enclosed with new clapboard siding, traditionally fabricated board and batten doors and a cedar shake roof.  A new wood floor was installed over the slab and lighting, fire detection and infrared heaters were installed to provide a three-season space.

Originally located on Middlebush Road in Franklin Township, the Rockingham Dutchrh4 barn had been anglicized prior to being dismantled, meaning its side aisle walls were raised and the roof ridge was rotated ninety degrees.  When it was dismantled, all of the original main H-bents were salvaged along with any original side aisle timbers and rafter plates that could be re-used.  Additionally, timbers were retained if they contained information, such as mortises, that provided evidence of the original configuration and evolution of the barn.  This included some floor joists which, although they were too deteriorated to be re-used, were actually original wall posts that provided valuable information on the original construction.  These timbers Continue reading

The Bergen County Historic Preservation Commission commends the Closter Borough Hall with an award on May 4th, 2017

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On May 4, Bergen County Executive James J. Tedesco III, the Board of Chosen Freeholders, the Department of Parks, the Division of Cultural and Historic Affairs and the Bergen County Historic Preservation Advisory Board, celebrating 35 years of historic preservation in Bergen County, N.J., recognized 13 deserving recipients with Bergen County Historic Preservation Awards.

AIA NJ wishes to congratulate the design team, including AIA N.J. Past President Michael Hanrahan, AIA and Clarke Caton Hintz, for being recognized for their contributions to the preservation of the Closter Borough Hall.

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Michael Hanrahan, AIA – 2011 President

“Clarke Caton Hintz was pleased to be part of this wonderful project.  It’s always nice to see a valued building restored so that it can continue to serve the community for generations to come”                                               ~Michael Hanrahan, AIA

Award Category: Restoration

Project Team: Mayor Emeritus Sophie Heymann and Council; Michael Hanrahan, AIA Clark Caton Hintz architectural firm; William Dahle, Superintendent, Dept. of Public Works; former Borough Administrators Richard Sheola and Jonathan DeJoseph; former Councilman Thomas Hennessey; members of the Closter Historic Preservation Commission.

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Continue reading

Historic Building Architects, LLC receives New Jersey State Historic Preservation Office Award for BAYADA

 

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Annabelle Radcliffe-Trenner, Principal,
Historic Building Architects LLC
312 West State Street,
Trenton, NJ 08618

Tel 609-393-3999
Fax 609-393-4333
www.hba-llc.com

 

Historic Overview:

 

This is an excellent example of a Greek Revival Italianate wood frame house built in 1858 by John Buzby. The house is located in the heart of the Moorestown Historic District at the intersection of Main Street and Mill Street. The property remained in the Buzby family until 1920.  Since then, it has transitioned to commercial use and was used as a hotel, beauty shop, and real estate office. In 2015, Mark Baiada, founder of BAYADA Home Health Care purchased the property with the intention of restoring it to its original grandeur for the corporate headquarters of his company.  Historic Building Architects, LLC were selected as the Preservation Architects to assist with the design and restoration of the house.  Extensive research was completed reviewing pattern books and architectural details and finishes used for the period.

 

Scope of Work:

 

This is truly a rehabilitation project.  It acknowledges the need to alter and add to the historic property to meet the continuing and changing uses while retaining the property’s historic character.  Although this project was for commercial office use, the owner wanted the architect to meticulously restore and preserve the interior architectural features of the building.  This included the wood floors that were salvaged and reused on the second floor, the wood inlaid details on the first floor, the plaster moldings and cornices, the stair details, including the decorative balustrades, the large wood paneled doors, the wood windows with their inlaid panels below, and the fireplace mantels were all meticulously preserved by skilled, largely local craftsmen.  Continue reading

EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW: NJ State Historic Preservation Awards TONIGHT!

062016#14Local Project Receives Prestigious Historic Preservation Award

The Millington Schoolhouse/Old Town Hall in Long Hill Township, NJ will be presented a 2017 New Jersey Historic Preservation Award on May 11, 2017.  The coveted award will be presented at a ceremony at the Burlington County Olde Courthouse to six preservation projects from across New Jersey.

“These awards are our chance to honor the many private individuals, organizations and corporations; and state, county and local governments who work hard to preserve New Jersey’s historic places,” said Katherine Marcopul, Administrator and Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer.  “It is inspiring to see citizens taking action to preserve New Jersey’s historic resources!”

The Millington Schoolhouse/Old Town Hall landmark building has served the community since its initial construction over 200 years ago.  Adapting to local needs and growth, the structure grew with several additions to become a library, and then the town hall.  It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

This award-winning rehabilitation of the structure is guided by a preservation plan developed by Clarke Caton Hintz, with AIA NJ Past President, Michael Hanrahan, AIA, as project manager and includes retention of the original school room, which will serve as open community meeting space and an exhibition gallery.

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The annual NJ Historic Preservation Awards honor projects, groups or persons, dedicated to preserving New Jersey’s history.  This year marks the 27th anniversary of the awards celebrating May as National Preservation Month.  The Awards are presented by the NJ State Historic Preservation Office in the Department of Environmental Protection, and the NJ Historic Sites Council.

For more information about the NJ Historic Preservation Awards Program, contact Kat Cannelongo at (609) 984-0543.

Bergen County is Celebrating National Historic Preservation Month and you are invited!

award-announce-02228_001In celebration of May 2017 National Historic Preservation Month, Bergen County will hold the 2017 Historic Preservation Commendation Awards on Thursday, May 4th at 7:00 p.m. at the historic St. Paul’s Episcopal Church located at 113 Engle Street, Englewood, NJ.
The 2017 Awards will be presented by Bergen County Executive James J. Tedesco III, Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders, the Historic Preservation Advisory Board and the Division of Cultural and Historic Affairs. A reception will follow the ceremony.
The public is invited to the program and reception. All are welcome.
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Advisory Board Member William J. Martin, AIA will Emcee the event on behalf of the Historic Preservation Advisory Board. The 12 member board is well stocked with AIA members, volunteering their time and expertise to promote and protect the culture and history of Bergen County. Bill is joined by Board Chairman Bruce A. Barton, AIA, Matthew Wolchko, AIA and John Cohen, AIA.
 
The Bergen County Historic Preservation Advisory Board serves as a resource to the Division of Cultural and Historic Affairs and to the County Executive and the Freeholders on historic preservation policy, interpretive programs, operation of county historic sites and facilities, preparation of a County Preservation Master Plan, and on acquisition and preservation of properties as county-owned historic sites. The board reviews applications and recommends funding for the Historic Preservation Trust Fund component of the BC Open Space Trust Fund, sponsors the annual County Historic Preservation Awards, reviews construction and development applications from the public and private sectors that may impact historic sites, sponsors educational seminars pertaining to preservation subjects, and, when requested, provides technical assistance on historic preservation to municipalities and private individuals. 

AIA South Jersey Member, Catherine Lorentz, AIA is featured in the news

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The Press of Atlantic City has featured Catherine’s home restoration project in their April Home and Garden section. Congratulations, Catherine, from your colleagues at AIA NJ. AC PRESS-1 copyAC PRESS-2

Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! 93 Reade Street by CTS Group wins an AIA NJ Merit Award in the historic preservation category

93 reade 1red_eagle93 READE STREET, NEW YORK CITY

 

CTS 93 Reade

HISTORICAL NARRATIVE

93 Reade St. is located in New York City’s Tribeca South Historic District.  This 5-story cast iron store and loft building was constructed in 1857 for the Jones family and is among the oldest surviving cast-iron-fronted buildings in New York.  Designed in the Italianate style, the building’s ornate façade is split into four bays at each story.  Bays are emphasized with fluted Corinthian columns while each floor line is emphasized by an ornate dentiled cornice.  On the upper stories, the window openings have flat-head arches with chamfered corners at the second through fourth stories and round arches at the fifth story.  Above the building cornice is a central arched pediment.  The cast iron façade had suffered from a significant lack of maintenance.  Additionally, it had undergone alterations in the form of a fire escape installation around the turn of the century and the original glass eye vault was covered with metal diamond plate with vault doors installed at the two west-most bays.

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Knightsbridge Properties acquired 93 Reade Street in 2011 and proposed an adaptive reuse for residential condominiums with a complete exterior restoration.  The CTS Group was retained by Knightsbridge Properties to prepare design and construction documents for the exterior façade restoration.  Restoration work was completed in 2016.

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FAÇADE RESTORATION

The Project included comprehensive restoration of 93 Reade Street’s 5-story cast iron façade which includes an arched building cornice pediment and 1st-floor storefront cornice.  As in many restorations, the complete extent of the work was not established until the scaffold was erected and the façade was fully surveyed.  However, major damage was apparent in the east and west bays due to settlement at the building’s party walls. Paint was removed from the entire façade using grit blasting and paint removers.  This revealed additional damage which had been obscured by the paint. Sections of the façade were carefully identified, tagged and removed to the restorer’s facility for restoration work.  Restoration included replacement of all missing and severely damaged features.  All the replacements were based on the original building features from which molds for the new castings were made.  All replacement components are cast iron and all new anchors are stainless steel for longevity.  All façade features were surveyed for damage to their supports.  All compromised supporting structure was repaired or replaced.  There were numerous in-situ repairs. These were done to limit wholesale disassembly where possible.  These repairs included work such as “stitching” for crack repair and adding sheet metal cladding at some sill areas to remedy back pitching due to structural settlement. All original cast iron column capitals had been removed from the building.  Rather than replicate the originals (for which no good photographic images existed) the Landmarks Commission approved a design which was modeled on, but not identical to, a typical column capital.  Due to their complexity the capitals were fabricated from GFRC.

Scientific paint analysis was used to determine the original cast iron paint color.  The entire cast iron façade was re-painted based on the analysis.  There is only a limited number of skilled cast iron restoration firms.  We acknowledge the capabilities of Allen Architectural Metals in realizing this successful, high quality, cast iron restoration.

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Call to Action: Federal Historic Tax Credit

Call To Action:

Federal Historic Tax Credit in Danger of Repeal in Tax Reform

The incoming Trump administration and Speaker Ryan have prioritized moving tax reform legislation in the first 100 days of the new Congress, likely including eliminating tax credits and deductions.

The HTC is the most significant federal financial commitment to historic preservation. Over the last 36 years, the credit has created 2.3 million jobs, leveraged $117 billion in investment, and rehabilitated more than 41,250 buildings – all while generating enough in federal revenue to pay for itself.

Keeping the federal Historic Tax Credit is essential to a place like New Jersey.  Without it, we would loose the traction gained on complimentary state legislation that AIANJ has supported for several years – namely, the Historic Properties Reinvestment Act (HPRA).  HPRAwould piggyback on the HTC where commercial/income-earning projects are involved.  The vast majority of states in country (and all states that border NJ) already have credit programs like HPRA.  NJ’s substantial stock of older buildings cries out for this type of re-investment and the sensible growth it promotes.

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Originally the RCA Victor Company’s Building 17, the Victor in Camden, NJ was made possible through the use of federal Historic Tax Credits about ten years ago

 

Contact your members of congress!

 
Call (during office hours) or email them!

Ask them to support the Historic Tax Credit as part of tax reform legislation that is expected to move through Congress. Explain the value of the HTC and ask your Members of Congress to express support to House Ways and Means Committee Chairman, Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX), and other committee members.

 

Locate the name and address of your Representative here: http://www.house.gov/representatives/find/

Locate the names and addresses of your Senators here: http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm?OrderBy=state&Sort=ASC

This link (courtesy of Preservation Action) provides a Historic Tax Credit fact sheet with key points to share with legislators:

http://www.preservationaction.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/HTC-Factsheet-2017.pdf 

Thank you for doing your part to advocate for the HTC!