Category Archives: Historic Resources

Information of Historic Resources and Historic Preservation.

AIA South Jersey Member, Catherine Lorentz, AIA is featured in the news

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The Press of Atlantic City has featured Catherine’s home restoration project in their April Home and Garden section. Congratulations, Catherine, from your colleagues at AIA NJ. AC PRESS-1 copyAC PRESS-2

Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! 93 Reade Street by CTS Group wins an AIA NJ Merit Award in the historic preservation category

93 reade 1red_eagle93 READE STREET, NEW YORK CITY

 

CTS 93 Reade

HISTORICAL NARRATIVE

93 Reade St. is located in New York City’s Tribeca South Historic District.  This 5-story cast iron store and loft building was constructed in 1857 for the Jones family and is among the oldest surviving cast-iron-fronted buildings in New York.  Designed in the Italianate style, the building’s ornate façade is split into four bays at each story.  Bays are emphasized with fluted Corinthian columns while each floor line is emphasized by an ornate dentiled cornice.  On the upper stories, the window openings have flat-head arches with chamfered corners at the second through fourth stories and round arches at the fifth story.  Above the building cornice is a central arched pediment.  The cast iron façade had suffered from a significant lack of maintenance.  Additionally, it had undergone alterations in the form of a fire escape installation around the turn of the century and the original glass eye vault was covered with metal diamond plate with vault doors installed at the two west-most bays.

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Knightsbridge Properties acquired 93 Reade Street in 2011 and proposed an adaptive reuse for residential condominiums with a complete exterior restoration.  The CTS Group was retained by Knightsbridge Properties to prepare design and construction documents for the exterior façade restoration.  Restoration work was completed in 2016.

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FAÇADE RESTORATION

The Project included comprehensive restoration of 93 Reade Street’s 5-story cast iron façade which includes an arched building cornice pediment and 1st-floor storefront cornice.  As in many restorations, the complete extent of the work was not established until the scaffold was erected and the façade was fully surveyed.  However, major damage was apparent in the east and west bays due to settlement at the building’s party walls. Paint was removed from the entire façade using grit blasting and paint removers.  This revealed additional damage which had been obscured by the paint. Sections of the façade were carefully identified, tagged and removed to the restorer’s facility for restoration work.  Restoration included replacement of all missing and severely damaged features.  All the replacements were based on the original building features from which molds for the new castings were made.  All replacement components are cast iron and all new anchors are stainless steel for longevity.  All façade features were surveyed for damage to their supports.  All compromised supporting structure was repaired or replaced.  There were numerous in-situ repairs. These were done to limit wholesale disassembly where possible.  These repairs included work such as “stitching” for crack repair and adding sheet metal cladding at some sill areas to remedy back pitching due to structural settlement. All original cast iron column capitals had been removed from the building.  Rather than replicate the originals (for which no good photographic images existed) the Landmarks Commission approved a design which was modeled on, but not identical to, a typical column capital.  Due to their complexity the capitals were fabricated from GFRC.

Scientific paint analysis was used to determine the original cast iron paint color.  The entire cast iron façade was re-painted based on the analysis.  There is only a limited number of skilled cast iron restoration firms.  We acknowledge the capabilities of Allen Architectural Metals in realizing this successful, high quality, cast iron restoration.

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Call to Action: Federal Historic Tax Credit

Call To Action:

Federal Historic Tax Credit in Danger of Repeal in Tax Reform

The incoming Trump administration and Speaker Ryan have prioritized moving tax reform legislation in the first 100 days of the new Congress, likely including eliminating tax credits and deductions.

The HTC is the most significant federal financial commitment to historic preservation. Over the last 36 years, the credit has created 2.3 million jobs, leveraged $117 billion in investment, and rehabilitated more than 41,250 buildings – all while generating enough in federal revenue to pay for itself.

Keeping the federal Historic Tax Credit is essential to a place like New Jersey.  Without it, we would loose the traction gained on complimentary state legislation that AIANJ has supported for several years – namely, the Historic Properties Reinvestment Act (HPRA).  HPRAwould piggyback on the HTC where commercial/income-earning projects are involved.  The vast majority of states in country (and all states that border NJ) already have credit programs like HPRA.  NJ’s substantial stock of older buildings cries out for this type of re-investment and the sensible growth it promotes.

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Originally the RCA Victor Company’s Building 17, the Victor in Camden, NJ was made possible through the use of federal Historic Tax Credits about ten years ago

 

Contact your members of congress!

 
Call (during office hours) or email them!

Ask them to support the Historic Tax Credit as part of tax reform legislation that is expected to move through Congress. Explain the value of the HTC and ask your Members of Congress to express support to House Ways and Means Committee Chairman, Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX), and other committee members.

 

Locate the name and address of your Representative here: http://www.house.gov/representatives/find/

Locate the names and addresses of your Senators here: http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm?OrderBy=state&Sort=ASC

This link (courtesy of Preservation Action) provides a Historic Tax Credit fact sheet with key points to share with legislators:

http://www.preservationaction.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/HTC-Factsheet-2017.pdf 

Thank you for doing your part to advocate for the HTC!

The BIG Ask

By Jerome Leslie Eben, AIA
AIANJ Member of the ArchiPAC Steering Committee

For those who do not know, ArchiPAC is the only federal political action committee (PAC) speaking up for members of the AIA. The mission has been and continues to be to support candidates running for the US House and Senate who support AIA’s initiatives to preserve the profession and promote positive solutions for the built environment. The Stearing Committee works with both sides of the aisle and this has been a key strategy for moving the AIA’s legislative agenda through Congress.

In one way or another I have been involved with ArchiPAC for over a decade. Back in 2006 we had jus 23 donations that totaled $3,351. Our numbers of donators and individual donations have steadily increased and by the end of last year, we had raised just over $10K.

With just two and one half months left we are some $3K short of that goal. Increasing our goal, which this year was to 10% above last year’s numbers, would elevate effectiveness and compete with our counterparts in the building and construction industry. By doing so we would in effect elevate the debate on Capitol Hill by bringing awareness to the issues that impact the practice of OUR profession from tax policies that affect cash flow to energy policies that impact how buildings are designed.

The above explanation leads to the BIG ask from me to all of you to make your donation before December 31st of this year.  It is easy to do so long as your check is not a corporate one. I am especially asking our entire current and past leadership to step up and make your donation and help with the ask so others will also contribute.

You can make your donation by visiting the contribution website ArchiPAC.org or mail a check payable to ArchiPAC to AIA Headquarters at 1735 New York Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20006

Meet ARCHI

Meet ARCHI

Thank you
Jerry

[email protected]

Historic Preservation Program: Documents for Managing Historic Property

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One-day Workshop:
Getting Your Historic House (Museum) in Order: Foundation Documents for Managing Your Historic Property

Saturday September 17 at Rutgers-Camden
If you missed this informative workshop last year, here is a second chance to attend, thanks to the newly launched Historic Preservation Continuing Education Program at Rutgers Camden.
This one-day workshop is open to volunteer and professional stewards of historic house museums who are looking to improve the preservation and interpretation of their site.
The course provides in-depth information about the planning documents that serve as the foundation for preserving, maintaining and interpreting historic house museums.  The workshop will focus on the components of each plan and how, together, the plans become the framework for site management. The workshop includes a tour of the nearby Walt Whitman House as a case study based on information presented.
Topics to be covered include:
  • Guidance on the development of Historic Structure Reports
  • Additional strategies for site preservation and interpretation, including plans for interiors, landscapes, fundraising, and maintenance
  • How disaster planning and ADA compliance impact historic sites
  • Tips on finding and working with consultants
Instructors:
Dorothy Hartman, Principal, History in the Making
Margaret M. Hickey, RA, Principal Historic Preservation Specialist, Connolly & Hickey Historical Architects
Details:
Date: Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016
Time: 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Cost: $75 (includes lunch)
Credits: .7 CEUs
7 AIA LUs

AIA South Jersey & AIA West Jersey Joint Meeting

AIA SJ&WJ Sept 13 2016 invitation

Historic Preservation Program Fall 2016

MARCH-logoNew Historic Preservation Program at Rutgers University—Camden will offer AIA credits!

The Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH) at Rutgers University—Camden has announced a new Historic Preservation Continuing Ed Program!

What better place to learn the processes and techniques of historic preservation than the living laboratory of Camden and nearby Philadelphia?!

Registration is now open for Fall 2016 courses, AIA credits available. More information on the program’s website.

Celebrate Architecture Week ’16

ArchWeek16Architecture Week and Social Media for AIA New Jersey

Hey! Every architect knows architecture week is April 10 through the 16th.

Learn more on Architecture Week at AIA.

By now you’re probably thinking, how can I participate in Architecture Week and get the word out to New Jersey about the value of architects.

You can help by participating in social media and using the Hashtags #ArchselfieNJ , #ArchWeek16 , #ILookup , and #Archselfie

Hashtags are a great way for social media users to tag their posts with keywords, which make them easier for social networks to organize information and users to search.

Remember last year?  AIA national launched the I Look Up  advertising campaign with the hashtag #ilookUp.  It is a great success!

Now it’s our turn! As architects in New Jersey,  Let’s use all these hashtags to help educate everyone in New Jersey about the value of architects in a fun and artsy way.

So go outside , or walk out into the lobby, and take that picture of yourself with the building of your choice in the background.  Every building has an architect so every architect should help.  Any beautiful building will do, no matter inside or outside or where it is.

Then be bold and post that Selfie to your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Foursquare, Pinterest, Houzz,  email it to all your friends,  let everyone know! AND don’t forget to use  #ArchselfieNJ

Have a great Architecture Week !AIAeagle_2016

—William J. Martin, AIA
AIA New Jersey Public Awareness Committee Co-Chair

Queen of Angels: When a Church Dies

I am looking for artists working in all kinds of mediums to participate in a fall 2016 exhibit that focuses attention on the soon-to-be-demolished Queen of Angels church in Newark, NJ.   The church and attached school are historic landmarks; built in the 1800’s by German immigrants, home to Newark’s first African American RC congregation, was at the epicenter of the ’67 rebellion and was used by Martin Luther King Jr. to deliver a speech 2 weeks before he was assassinated.   The archdiocese somehow got permission to demolish these historic structures and plans to sell the vacant land to developers.   I will be giving tours (as possible) and collecting artifacts that artists can use in their artwork.   I will post pictures for those who are interested.

Found object sculpture, collage, furniture design, installation art, drawing, painting, poetry, photography, video and performance art that deals with the themes of church, school, civil rights, gentrification, historic preservation and related topics will be considered for inclusion in this exhibit.   The point of the exhibit is to shine a light on the church’s history & demise and give second life to artifacts found on the site.   Previous “ar+chaeology” exhibits have focused on the old Newark Jail, Westinghouse, the Pabst Brewery, Newark theaters and Downtown Newark.   I haven’t produced an exhibit like this for 5 years and am very excited to take this one on to help Newark celebrate its 350th anniversary this year.   A location and exact date for the exhibit has not been set but a deadline for submissions will be approximately end of July.   Additional requirements, guidelines and timetable will be released in the coming weeks.

-Matthew Gosser
Director, CoAD Gallery, Newark and Dolphin Gallery, Paterson
[email protected]

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Remembering Malcolm Wells, FAIA

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As part of The Wetlands Institute’s 2016 Winter Lecture Series, AIA South Jersey President Bruce D. Turner, AIA was recently part of a retrospective and panel discussion at the Wetlands Institute in Stone Harbor, NJ. The topic of the presentation was The Legacy of Malcolm Wells, FAIA: The Father of Gentle Architecture. The bulk of the presentation was made by professor and planner Rev. Wayne Conrad. Rev. Conrad was a friend and colleague of Mr. Wells and spoke both personally and professionally about his relationship with “Mac”. He specifically focussed on Mr. Wells’ early life and career, his office in Cherry Hill, his churches in Moorestown and Cherry Hill, and his earth-sheltered architecture in general, including Wells’ home in Cape Cod. Rev. Conrad further reflected on how Wells’ work was inspired by the beauty of nature, and a need for a more sustainable world.

Mr. Turner’s portion of the discussion aimed to put Mr. Wells’ work in the context of the overall architectural profession at the time Mr. Wells was working as well as the professional environment we experience today. That included observations about codes and regulations, standards of practice, legal and liability concerns, LEED, sustainability, energy efficiency, the 2030 Challenge and Cradle-to-Cradle ideologies. He also sought to draw parallels for the audience with architects and architecture which they might be familiar, or recently observed in the media, such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Fay Jones, Bjarke Ingels, and Alejandro Aravena.

A third member of the panel was Rev. Bob Williams. Rev. Williams reflected on his personal liturgical experience ministering from Wells’ St. Andrews United Methodist Church in Cherry Hill. This also included observations about the use of light, the use of natural materials, and the sense of proportion and scale present in these buildings.

For more information about Malcolm Wells, FAIA, please visit his website here. For more information about the Wetlands Institute and other programs and activities they offer, please visit the Wetlands Institute website here.