Category Archives: Emerging Professionals

Information for young architects, interns, students and other Emerging Professionals in architecture.

Jersey Shore Position Available

Job Position:

Architect / Architect in Training.

Job Description and Requirements:

The architectural firm of Yezzi Associates, located in Toms River, N.J., is currently seeking an Architect or Architect in training. The potential candidate must have experience in producing construction documents and design under minor supervision.

The architect’s duties will include accurately preparing project construction documents; communicating with and coordinating the preparation of documents with consultants, contractors, team members; reviewing shop drawings, project submittals, etc. for document compliance; documenting code review and compliance; communicating and coordinating with management, clients, consultants and contractors related to daily business operations; supervising various aspects of assigned projects.

The potential candidate must:

  • Be able to work independently, or as part of a design team, under minor supervision.
  • Have a minimum of 3 years’ experience
  • Demonstrate proficiency in using the latest Autocad (Autodesk) software release
  • Demonstrate proficiency in using the latest SketchUp 3D software release (and/or any other 3D renderingsoftware).
  • Demonstrate proficiency in using the latest Microsoft Office Suite software release
  • Have strong organizational skills.
  • Have the ability to work well under pressure, often against tight deadlines.
  • Have excellent oral and written communication skills.
  • Have the ability to interact with executives, external client and vendors.
  • Be quality minded and self-motivated.

ADVOCACY VALUE STATEMENT  

February 2017

AIAeagle_2016AIA New Jersey (AIANJ) is more important than ever as our country is going through transitions. Our profession has been respected by all because of our values and our commitment to improve the built environment. It is important for us to represent our membership to support or to defend these values.

 

AIA National has released 2017 Statement of our Values, AIA NJ is united in support of the national statement:

Value Statement 

In it we state our priorities:

  • We stand for equity and human rights,
  • We stand for architecture that strengthens our communities,
  • We stand for a sustainable future,
  • We stand for protecting communities from the impact of climate change,
  • We stand for economic opportunity,
  • We stand for investing in the future, and
  • We speak up, and policymakers listen.

Read more at AIA

 

AIA New Jersey

AIA NJ has our professional values that echoes the AIA National statement. As licensed Architects we are all working to advance the quality of life of built environment and protect the health, safety and welfare of the public. We also has our values formulated through the efforts of our PROFESSIONAL Committees. The following are the values and programs specifically developed in AIA NJ:

  • Sustainable Environment
  • Resiliency
  • Health & Wellness
  • Historic Resources
  • Homeland Security
  • Diversity & Women in Architecture

As we set our ADVOCACY agenda and priorities for 2017, the above values statement for AIA and AIA NJ are the most important issues for our MEMBERS.

Therefore, it is important that the Communication, Public Awareness, Legislative & Government Affairs and Membership committees all working toward the same goals.

Ben P. Lee,
AIA NJ President

A Lifetime of Love for Family, and Architecture

Jerome Leslie Eben, AIA

Jerome Leslie Eben, FAIA

West Orange, NJ
February 14, 2017

On Friday, January 27th, NJ Architect Jerome Leslie Eben, FAIA, was sorting his thoughts in preparation of sharing his passion with more than 50 students at the 7th annual Pacific Cascade Middle School Career Fair in Issaquah, WA. Jerry had flown across the country from his home in West Orange, NJ to Issaquah, WA to share this very special event with his grandson, Alex Kernish.  On that day, classes of 6th, 7th and 8th graders would hear Mr. Eben speak on his profession, being an architect!  Jerry’s goal in making these presentations, estimated to have reached more than 10,000 people over the last 30 years, has always been to explain that the role of the architect in society is vital, protecting the health, safety and welfare of the public, through the buildings that architects design.

How did this long distance invitation from the principal come to be, over the possibility of recruiting a local professional to visit the children? Alex’s mother, Dena, knows that there is no greater cheerleader for the cause than her beloved father, and submitted his contact information for consideration.

In Jerry’s toolkit were a few dozen of the beautiful photographs taken by Alexander Noble for the decade old AIA-NJ 150 Buildings and Places exhibit. Jerry’s confident that his nostalgic, historical storytelling, interwoven with the images, formed a lasting memory for a lot of these young adults.  He does not doubt that after leaving the classroom, they did look up at some of the wonderful architecture that is nestled so well within the natural and planted landscape of Issaquah, including their own beautiful school, provided by a board that understands the value of quality and consistency in their built environment, an so employs a district architect to provide all of the services to their school community. He knows that the seeds have been planted for some of these youngsters to come east for vacation with their families, seeking a trip back in time at the Edison Museum or maybe to consider applying to college in some of the magnificent halls shared in the images of Rutgers and Princeton.

He explained to them that if they like to draw, build, create or experiment with structures they should consider architecture as a career.  He stated that “it is a profession that you can continue to do into old age” and mentioned, Gilbert Seltzer, AIA, from West Orange, who goes to work every day and is more than a century young!

Jerry taught the importance of building codes, explaining why big buildings have at least two means of egress, sprinklers and rules about occupancy and use.  He encouraged that on their visits to the local movie theater or shopping mall, (and especially if they are on their own) that they need to be cognizant of where they are and that sometimes the way in to a building is not the fastest way out!

Jerry conveyed the role of the American Institute of Architects, the international, professional society, which has and continues to support architects, now in its 160th year, with continuing education, career advice, contracts and political advocacy, and most of all unification, providing one voice for architects to share and promote their values.

Jerry encourages us all to take some time out to go to a local school and speak about what it is that we do. It can be a real benefit for these young people and us, because those who do not choose to become architects may be our clients, and an informed person makes a better client!

AIA South Jersey EPiC Event

Date:  Thursday, February 9, 2017
Time:  6:00 pm
Location:  Strike Zone Lanes
Egg Harbor City, NJ

Cost:  Free

All Emerging Professionals Invited

RSVP:  Christina Amey, AIA
[email protected]
609-602-6669

aia-sj-epic-feb-9-2017-invitation

President’s Message – 2016 Highlights

JAM_headshotHappy New Year to all of you and I wish you a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year!  With the New Year comes a new president, Ben Lee AIA, who is very excited and has some great initiatives that promote the goals of AIA-NJ’s Strategic Plan.  I called Ben over the holiday weekend wishing him the best of luck and he knows he has my full support.  For me this has been a fabulous year as president that just went by all too fast.  As members you can rest assure that those serving on the Board of Trustees have you in mind as they represent you better then can be expected.  Without them I could not have accomplished my goals as president and I thank them for their support and their continued support for Ben Lee.  Some of our accomplishments in 2016 are as follows:

• Creation of the AIA New Jersey Center for Architecture– as a result of meetings with the six AIANJ Sections a Committee has been formed and is working toward a schedule of events to be hosted throughout the state with the Center as a “pop-up”.  I will remain closely involved as the idea of a Center has been near and dear to my heart for more than five years now and I believe this is the best vehicle for outreach to the general public.
• Resiliency/Disaster Assistance– AIANJ had its first Training of the Trainers for Disaster Assistance Training.  We now have five certified trainers here in NJ that will continue to provide training to NJ professionals.  We also held our first Hurriplantraining that provided more than twenty architects with the tools to prepare a community for a hurricane.  We will continue to work with the State Police in order to have the AIANJ Post Disaster Assessment team members registered so that in time of a declared disaster, they may be activated by the Governor.
• Lightweight Construction Materials – we continue to work with our legislators through our Task Force to educate them as to the proper use and protection of lightweight construction materials in multi-family construction.  We are committed to working with DCA on improvements to the building code as outlined in the Whitepaper issued by the Taskforce with the potential of seeing our recommendations considered in the International Building Code.
• AIANJ Large Firm Roundtable  We will continue to develop a Large Firm Roundtable so that the large firms here in NJ can discuss the issues that are unique to them.  All those firms interested in participating that have a staff of 25 or more, please contact me.
• AIANJ Scholarship Foundation  I will continue to work with the Scholarship Foundation on the formation of a new foundation to be the AIA New Jersey Foundation that will have a broader mission and be more closely aligned with AIANJ.  The Scholarship Foundation has been committed and provided thousands of dollars over the years in scholarships to NJ students attending a school of architecture and we want to see this continue as well as other programs and events that will be beneficial to members and the public.  Much thanks to the past and current Scholarship Foundation Board!
• AIANJ Governance  The Board of Trustees in our last board meeting of the year voted in favor of a new governance structure that will reduce the number of board members as well as open board seats up to individuals from the public.  In order for AIANJ to remain relevant it is important that we see and understand the public’s viewpoint on architects.  This is a big step for AIANJ and one that will allow the organization to grow and provide more for its members.

In closing, my experience over the last twelve years being involved in AIA has been priceless.  My motivation has always been to make our profession a better place to practice and to mentor and to continue to promote the profession to the public.  I like to believe that I have left my mark on my work thus far with AIA Newark & Suburban as well as AIA New Jersey, and I will continue to do so.  In the meantime, it is now up to you to get involved and make this AIA your AIA!

Sincerely,

Justin_sig

Justin A. Mihalik AIA

2016 President

South Jersey CANstruction Event

canstructionThe Food Bank of South Jersey to host it’s second annual Canstruction event at Rutgers Camden.  They are looking for architects and engineers to participate.

Get your team together today, design and build a can structure, and help fight hunger.  Find out more information

About the Food Bank of South Jersey

The Food Bank of South Jersey (FBSJ) is based in Pennsauken, New Jersey and it exists to provide an immediate solution to the urgent problem of hunger by providing food to needy people, teaching them to eat nutritiously, and helping them to find sustainable ways to improve their lives. For the past 30 years, the Food Bank has provided relief to struggling families and vulnerable seniors who live in Burlington, Camden, Gloucester and Salem counties.

All of this is made possible because of partners like you. When you donate funds or food to FBSJ, you are making a genuine difference in people’s lives. For that, we say “Thank You!”

Information about Canstruction Pennsauken

February 10 – 22 (Please review the event schedule on the previous page)
Rutgers University, Student Campus Center ● 326 Penn Street ● Camden, NJ

Theme: Food Lovers

Team Next Steps

Your team should designate a Team Captain and Mentor. Thoroughly review the Team Captain Guidebook to become familiar with the Rules and Regulations, Design Principles, and the Design Process.

Teams should be actively procuring the cans of food necessary for a winning structure. The Food Bank has resources to help teams procure cans for use in the build.  See foodbanksj.org for additional information.

Submit Design

Tuesday, January 31: deadline for submitting design sketch, dimensions, structure title & description.

2015 South Jersey Canstruction

CANwit ARH SJ2015

Adams Rehmann & Heggan CAN-Do “Wit”

Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals – Brian Penschow

“Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals” is an eight-part series that will be published on the AIA NJ blog over the course of the month of October, AIA Emerging Professionals Month. In this series, our young professionals will chronicle the personal stories of how they were attracted to become architects — and how architecture inspires them.

epic_penshaw.jpg    Drawing Out My Inner Creativity

I like to joke with people that I came to architecture after trying accounting, anthropology, and archaeology, but that isn’t really true – my career path wasn’t nearly that simple. And while it is true that I played with legos and lincoln logs when I was a child, grew up in and around the beautiful architecture of New York City, and had a poster of the World Trade Center with the 1976 King Kong on my bedroom wall, none of those things inspired me to become an architect or even led me to architecture school.

In grade school, I wanted to be a marine biologist, but I didn’t know how to make a life out of that. (Ironically, my wife found a way; she actually teaches Marine Biology.)

As I grew older, my plans transformed and I was convinced that I would be a patent attorney, as my logic skills and gifts with mathematics and science would help me excel in that field. I planned to get an undergraduate engineering degree, and then go to law school, but none of that worked out. The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry.

While I did enter engineering school at the age of seventeen, I never finished my degree. After bouncing around several different jobs, some of which I considered possible careers, I decided to go back to school and study business, which ended up being a complete disaster. I was good at engineering, but in engineering there is one particular solution to a problem, and there is very limited room for creativity. I found business school very boring, and it’s no exaggeration to say that I was completely lost.

It wasn’t until I took my first class in architecture at my local community college that I finally felt at home. I was willing to work long hours, stay up all night, cry after brutal critiques, and even sacrifice a social life for a discipline that would allow me to use all of my skills and creativity. Architectural school, for the first time, helped me release my inner creativity that was always trying to get out.

My inspiration for becoming an architect, and for producing architecture comes from within. Finding that locus of inspiration within me is the secret to my ambition, my drive, and, in large part, to my success.

Brian Penschow, AIA

NCARB Launches ARE 5.0

The Architect Registration Examination® (ARE®) 5.0 launched November 1, 2016, and incorporates the latest testing technology.

ncarbLearn more at NCARB.com

The next version of the Architect Registration Examination® (ARE®), ARE 5.0, will launch November 1, 2016, incorporating the latest testing technologies and format that more closely aligns with modern practice. The six-division exam will include case studies that simulate real-world practice, and will be offered without a fee increase.

Developed by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), the multi-division exam is taken by all candidates seeking architectural licensure in the United States. As with all licensing exams, the ARE is updated periodically to ensure it continues to test the knowledge and skills necessary for the independent practice of architecture.

To adapt to changes in the profession, ARE 5.0 will incorporate a new division structure and the latest graphic testing methods. The exam content has been reorganized into six divisions, which are designed to reflect the phases of architectural practice—from practice management to construction and evaluation. The new divisions also align with the experience areas of the Architectural Experience Program (AXP), making the licensure process smoother and easier to understand for candidates.

Incorporating the Latest Testing Technology

The new exam will retire vignettes—a graphic question type used in the current version—and incorporate two new question types: hot spots and drag-and-place. ARE 5.0 will also include case studies to assess a candidate’s ability to synthesize multiple pieces of information. Each ARE 5.0 division will feature 80 to 120 questions comprised of these new question types, plus multiple-choice, check-all-that-apply, and fill-in-the-blank questions.

NCARB carefully develops the ARE in conjunction with hundreds of practicing architects who volunteer their time, services, and expertise to write, test, and analyze the exam. The ARE is then reviewed by experts who verify the questions are fair, reliable, and in compliance with national testing standards.

 

YAF Connection October 2016

yaf-connect_11_16The latest Young Architects Forum publication Connection has been released.
The topic is Data Driven Design.   Click on link below to the publication:

Interested in learning more about the Young Architects Forum (YAF) reach out to
the AIANJ Young Architect Regional Director Jessica O’Donnell.

Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals – Megan Pritts

megan_pritts“Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals” is an eight-part series that will be published on the AIA NJ blog over the course of the month of October, AIA Emerging Professionals Month. In this series, our young professionals will chronicle the personal stories of how they were attracted to become architects — and how architecture inspires them.

At the age of 5, I already knew I wanted to become an architect. What inspired me was the environment around me in which I grew up. Living in the suburbs, I drew variations of what I saw from houses to gardens to school buildings. I drew a house for each of my friends with vibrant colors and imaginative shapes that reflected the personality or image of them in my head.I drew each of these houses from the view of the street and later learned that one side or face of a building is called a facade. My series of facade studies started taking shape within a neighborhood where I drew landscapes, roads and driveways connecting all of the homes to other buildings like schoolhouses. I assume this progression from drawing houses to interconnected neighborhoods came from riding the school bus every day and beginning to understand how neighborhoods are planned and connected.

I would argue that anything can be inspirational for a child. I found so much inspiration from my natural surroundings and the built world I lived in that I used that to imagine new structures that would enhance the existing environment. My passion for drawing and my early imagination led me to develop a sense or ability to design at a young age.

Growing up, I never stopped sketching, designing and planning, so it was only natural for me to pursue a career in architecture.

Megan Prittsi_am_epic