Category Archives: Associates

NJ Emerging Professionals Committee

Caravello_2014Call for Interest – State Emerging Professionals Committee

 

AIA NJ is creating the first inaugural State Emerging Professionals Committee and is looking for individuals to take on this great leadership opportunity. All interested should apply to Regional Associate Director, Nick Caravella, by August 21,2015. Candidates will be notified of their selection September 7th, 2015.

 

SURE HOUSE Tour, Networking Reception & Fundraiser

Join the USGBC NJ for a very special event: SURE HOUSE Tour, Networking Reception & Fundraiser

Wednesday, July 22nd, 6:00-9:00 PM. Hoboken, NJ. 
 
SURE HOUSE is Stevens Institute of Technology’s Solar Decathlon entry for 2015. CLICK HERE to Register.
SURE_House_2015_v1

Registration for East Coast Green open now

Registration open for East Coast Green 2015
Creating a Culture of Sustainability

June 17, 2015
8:30 am to 4:00 pm
at NJIT School of Architecture

AIA & USGBC Continuing Ed credits
Early Bird Deadline for registration June 1st

  

Event: NJIT Design Showcase

NJIT Design Showcase

April 9, 2015

AIA-NJ Endowed Lecturers will be Jesse Reiser, AIA (bio) and Nanako Umemoto. Look them up! (Click here.) They will be talking about their global practice and recent large-scale projects globally and I think specifically in Asia.

Check the NJIT Design Showcase website for more details.

IDP Seminar To Be Held – February 12th

IDP_Feb12_2015

CDS Internship Development Program Seminar

Thursday, February 12, 2015 from 6:00 pm to 9:30 pm, Weston College of Architecture and Design, Gallery.

Presenters will overview Intern Development Program (IDP), the Architect Registration Exam (ARE), including an update on recent NCARB changes.

1 AIA CEU approved event

See more information:  or view PDF here – IDP_NJIT_Feb2015

Must Pre-Register:  https://njit-csm.symplicity.com/surveys/IDP2015

Sponsored by NJIT Career Development, AIA New Jersey, and local section AIA Newark & Suburban

 

AIA-NJ Celebrates Successes and Looks Toward Future

2015 Officers Installed, Design Competition Winners and Service Award  Recipients Honored, During Jan. 9 Event

(L to R)  Kimberly Bunn AIA, Kurt Kalafsky AIA, Nicholas Caravella Assoc AIA, Judith Donnelly AIA, Steve Lazarus AIA, Verity Frizzell AIA, Ben Lee AIA, Justin Mihalik AIA

(L to R) Kimberly Bunn AIA, Kurt Kalafsky AIA, Nicholas Caravella Assoc AIA, Judith Donnelly AIA, Steve Lazarus AIA, Verity Frizzell AIA, Ben Lee AIA, Justin Mihalik AIA

Capping an eventful year for the architectural profession in New Jersey, AIA-NJ gathered with friends and family on Friday night to celebrate the year’s architectural successes. At AIA-NJ’s annual awards gala, held January 9, 2015, at the Moorestown Community House, the organization installed its slate of officers for 2015, providing a glimpse into who will be steering the organizational ship in the coming year. The 2015 officers include:

  • Kimberly Bunn, AIA, of Moorestown, N.J., was sworn in to the role of AIA-NJ president in 2015. Owner and principal of Moorestown-based Bunn Architecture, Bunn has been a member of AIA for 16 years, and has served in a leadership capacity for more than a decade. Bunn currently sits on the Board of Trustees and chairs the Communications Committee; she is still active in her local West Jersey section where she was president in 2006.
  • Justin A. Mihalik, AIA, of Essex Fells, N.J., will serve as president elect. A principal at Essex Fells, N.J.-based J.A. Mihalik Architect LLC, Mihalik has been a member of AIA-NJ for the past 15 years, and previously served the organization as first vice president and treasurer.
  • Ben Lee, AIA, of Morristown, N.J., will serve as the organization’s first vice president. Managing principal and chief financial officer of Morristown-based NK Architects, Lee has more than 35 years of experience in architecture. He was previously AIA-NJ’s treasurer, and was also the 2011 president for Architects League of Northern New Jersey, one of AIA-NJ’s six local sections.
  • Verity Frizzell, AIA, of Bay Head, N.J. will serve as AIA-NJ’s second vice president. A principal at Point Pleasant, N.J.-based Feltz & Frizzell Architects LLC, Frizzell has over two decades of experience in commercial and residential architecture. She has served as president of the Jersey Shore section of AIA-NJ, and received the 2011 AIA-NJ Distinguished Service Award and 2003 AIA Jersey Shore Young Architect of the Year service award.
  • Steven Lazarus, AIA, of Englewood, N.J., will serve as treasurer. A founding principal of Englewood-based Axis Architectural Studio, Lazarus has been a registered architect and member of AIA since 1986 and is a former second vice president of AIA-NJ.
  • Judy Donnelly, AIA, of Hackettstown, N.J., will continue her two-year term as secretary. The principal owner of Hackettstown-based Donnelly Architecture, LLC, Donnelly has been an active member of AIA for more than 10 years, and has served the organization in many capacities including secretary, first vice president and president-elect of AIA Newark and Suburban Architects.
  • Robert Cozzarelli, AIA, of Belleville N.J., will continue as the organization’s regional director. A principal of Rutherford, N.J.-based Cozzarelli-Cirminiello Architects, Cozzarelli is a 28-year member of AIA. He has served the organization in many capacities including 2004 president. A 1979 graduate of the New Jersey Institute of Technology School of Architecture, Robert is a Licensed Registered Architect in four states and a past winner of the AIA-NJ Architect of the Year award.
  • Nicholas Caravella Associate AIA, of Morristown N.J., will assume the post of Regional Associate Director.  Currently employed at Gensler, Caravella has also served as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Architects League of Northern NJ, where he was engaged in various projects supporting emerging professionals and young architects.
  • Kurt M Kalafsky, AIA, of Howell, N.J., will serve as past president. A founding principal and chief technology officer of Iselin, N.J.-based The Aztec Corporation and Aztec Architects LLC, Kalafsky has been an AIA-NJ member for 22 years and has served in several other positions, including, most recently, president, and was also secretary and chair of the Bylaws and Codes and Standards committees. Kurt will also chair the AIA National Resolutions Committee in 2015.

“In 2014, the architecture profession continued to play an integral role in the state of New Jersey as we continue our recovery from Superstorm Sandy and move toward more innovative and sustainable infrastructure,” Bunn said.  “We saw successful passage of legislation that will help the state better respond to natural disasters, brought together industry and community leaders for discussion on resiliency, and helped our local communities continue to rebuild.  Looking forward to 2015, we plan to maintain this focus.  At the same time we will continue our traditional initiatives – mentoring tomorrow’s architects, hosting educational seminars, and participating in community service projects.   I am excited to be assuming the office of president and look forward to helping to lead this organization along this path”

In addition to the officer installation, the dinner honored the winners of its annual design competition. A total of 13 projects were recognized for their originality and advancement of the field. Additionally, AIA-NJ honored the six recipients of its service awards, which are bestowed upon individuals and firms that have demonstrated exceptional service to the profession, and presented its annual scholarship to Saif Haobsh, a New Jersey Institute of Technology architecture student.

HABS/HAER/HALS Summer Employment Opportunities for Students

npsAnnouncing Summer Employment Opportunities for Students
Hiring: ARCHITECTS, HISTORIANS, and LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

The Heritage Documentation Programs, NPS seeks applications from qualified students for 2014 summer employment documenting historic sites and structures of architectural, landscape and technological significance throughout the country. Duties involve on-site field work and preparation of measured and interpretive drawings, and written historical reports for the HABS/HAER/HALS Collections at the Prints and Photographs Division of The Library of Congress. Projects last 12 weeks, beginning in late May or early June.

View the job announcements and learn other important application details on our website at http://www.nps.gov/history/hdp/jobs/summer.htm

Applications Due: 17 March 2014

——————————————-
Robert Arzola
HABS Architect and Holland Prize Coordinator Heritage Documentation Programs
HABS, National Park Service
Washington DC
——————————————-2014 Summer Hiring Poster

Library of the Future – IDP Design Competition

National IDP Design Competition

This Competition is for those interns working with an advisor.  They can earn as much as 300 hours through participation in the Competition. Prequalification is not required; only submission by due date and application fee.  Teams are encouraged.

More information and forms can be viewed on the aiasfv.org website.

 

IDP Competition Flyer Phase2

How to “Engage” Emerging Professionals 101

Recently, you may have heard about the AIA Repositioning effort.  One of its initiatives is to improve “engaging emerging professionals.” First and foremost, if you do not know what an emerging professional is, welcome to the club. According to the AIA, emerging professionals (EPs) are students, interns and the recently licensed architects in the first decade of practice.  To most architects, this equates to anyone they consider a potential employee. That said one of the biggest flaws with this mentality is that architects approach engagement with EPs as they would a job interview.  This is a missed opportunity to create a dialogue with someone an architect should consider their collaborative colleague albeit that that he or she is also their employee.

As such here are the do’s and don’ts on how architects should engage emerging professionals:

  • Do not ask about licensure unless the EP mentions it first. Some professionals do not intend on getting licensed and that is perfectly okay! Licensure is important to those on the path to becoming an architect but not everyone needs to be an architect to enjoy architecture. Do ask if they are enjoying what they are doing.
  • When talking to students, do not ask them how their studio project is going. You might as well be asking them how they are doing and then expecting a lengthy explanation of what ails them. What architects should ask is “what are you learning from this semester”.
  • Don’t ask the EP if they know Revit. That is equivalent to an EP asking an architect if they are still hand drafting! We exist in a time in the field where every 3-5 years major changes are made to either how someone is licensed or interns, what tools are used to design buildings, and what economic condition one enters into the field. Instead try asking them if they are getting the most from the tools they are using or from their work experience.
  • Don’t assume an EP knows about every event offered by the AIA just because they are on social media and connected to the Internet. The communication path sometimes skips telling EPs about important details regarding events or the process involved. Members of the AIA who have attended multiple events numerous times know what to do and what to expect; they might forget about this first time attending. Do invite EPs to events in person and offer to escort them and introduce them to others. Even offering to meet them and drive them to the event can reduce some nerves.
  • If an architect is looking at an EP as a potential employee or if they are just interested in what they are saying, don’t ask the EP to send you their resume, instead ask them to BRING you their resume and meet them at your office. Remember that inviting an EP to the office, even if it’s not for the purpose of employment, allows EPs to experience another atmosphere without leaving their current position.
  • The worst thing an architect can do is treat an EP like a child. Just because the term “emerging” is used does not mean that EPs have not already found their voice or already developed the knowledge of an architect. Mentorship is not parenthood! Do instill knowledge, help EPs when they ask, but never scold them for the paths they choose. They are adults, not children.

Of course, this process is a two way street. Emerging Professionals should always treat any professional with the same respect that they wish to receive and should follow through with any commitment that they extend. Furthermore, emerging professionals should also make the effort and engage licensed architects.

Emerging professionals should not be the focus of the AIA Repositioning. Rather, they just need to be included in these efforts and valued like any other member.

Jason Peist, Assoc. AIA
Regional Associate Director | New Jersey Region

ss

[email protected] | @AIANJRAD

metamorphAIAsis- Emerging Leaders

metamorpAIAsis image

The Intern Development Program (IDP) prepares future architects for the requirements of our profession. However, it is through the AIA that the Leaders of Architecture are made.

Every day we listen to advocacy for the profession. When you open AutoCAD each morning, when you point a major design flaw in a project and even now by reading this article, you are advocating for architecture!

It is easy for us to talk about architecture. What is not easy is talking about architects. Furthermore, it is even harder to talk about yourself. Buildings are stagnant, they are what they are. We can classify buildings by period, style, and recall a number of facts that would impress your college history professors. But can you talk about yourself in the same way, with the same passion, as you can your favorite building? If your answer is no, then you should consider becoming more involved in the AIA and its programs.

One simple problem for emerging professionals is the fact that we are not architects; how can you speak for something you are not. Let’s forget the term architect for the moment (as that is an entire lengthy discussion in itself), and replace it with the term Leader. What the AIA is good at accomplishing is evoking passion for what you do and passion is what inspires leadership. There are no state laws that prevent you from calling yourself a Leader!

As a 2nd time attendee of the annual Grassroots Leadership Conference held in D.C., I have noticed a drastic change between 1st time attendees and those who return. During my 1st conference, I followed my local chapter and only sat next to somebody I knew. What I missed was the wealth of information and mentorship every person in that room possesses. When I had the opportunity to attend the conference again, I was not shy about asking people to share their knowledge with me!

In hopes of inspiring you, I will begin my conversation with you by instilling some knowledge…

Let’s reimagine this quote by Louis Kahn where the Brick is not your building, but it is YOU!

And if you think of Brick, for instance,
and you say to Brick,
“What do you want Brick?”
And Brick says to you
“I like an Arch.”
And if you say to Brick
“Look, arches are expensive,
and I can use a concrete lentil over you.
What do you think of that?”
Brick?”
Brick says:
“… I like an Arch””

Jason Peist, Assoc. AIA
Regional Associate Director | New Jersey Region

ss

[email protected] | @AIANJRAD

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 58 other followers