Category Archives: Emerging Professionals

Information for young architects, interns, students and other Emerging Professionals in architecture.

President’s Message – 2016 Highlights

JAM_headshotHappy New Year to all of you and I wish you a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year!  With the New Year comes a new president, Ben Lee AIA, who is very excited and has some great initiatives that promote the goals of AIA-NJ’s Strategic Plan.  I called Ben over the holiday weekend wishing him the best of luck and he knows he has my full support.  For me this has been a fabulous year as president that just went by all too fast.  As members you can rest assure that those serving on the Board of Trustees have you in mind as they represent you better then can be expected.  Without them I could not have accomplished my goals as president and I thank them for their support and their continued support for Ben Lee.  Some of our accomplishments in 2016 are as follows:

• Creation of the AIA New Jersey Center for Architecture– as a result of meetings with the six AIANJ Sections a Committee has been formed and is working toward a schedule of events to be hosted throughout the state with the Center as a “pop-up”.  I will remain closely involved as the idea of a Center has been near and dear to my heart for more than five years now and I believe this is the best vehicle for outreach to the general public.
• Resiliency/Disaster Assistance– AIANJ had its first Training of the Trainers for Disaster Assistance Training.  We now have five certified trainers here in NJ that will continue to provide training to NJ professionals.  We also held our first Hurriplantraining that provided more than twenty architects with the tools to prepare a community for a hurricane.  We will continue to work with the State Police in order to have the AIANJ Post Disaster Assessment team members registered so that in time of a declared disaster, they may be activated by the Governor.
• Lightweight Construction Materials – we continue to work with our legislators through our Task Force to educate them as to the proper use and protection of lightweight construction materials in multi-family construction.  We are committed to working with DCA on improvements to the building code as outlined in the Whitepaper issued by the Taskforce with the potential of seeing our recommendations considered in the International Building Code.
• AIANJ Large Firm Roundtable  We will continue to develop a Large Firm Roundtable so that the large firms here in NJ can discuss the issues that are unique to them.  All those firms interested in participating that have a staff of 25 or more, please contact me.
• AIANJ Scholarship Foundation  I will continue to work with the Scholarship Foundation on the formation of a new foundation to be the AIA New Jersey Foundation that will have a broader mission and be more closely aligned with AIANJ.  The Scholarship Foundation has been committed and provided thousands of dollars over the years in scholarships to NJ students attending a school of architecture and we want to see this continue as well as other programs and events that will be beneficial to members and the public.  Much thanks to the past and current Scholarship Foundation Board!
• AIANJ Governance  The Board of Trustees in our last board meeting of the year voted in favor of a new governance structure that will reduce the number of board members as well as open board seats up to individuals from the public.  In order for AIANJ to remain relevant it is important that we see and understand the public’s viewpoint on architects.  This is a big step for AIANJ and one that will allow the organization to grow and provide more for its members.

In closing, my experience over the last twelve years being involved in AIA has been priceless.  My motivation has always been to make our profession a better place to practice and to mentor and to continue to promote the profession to the public.  I like to believe that I have left my mark on my work thus far with AIA Newark & Suburban as well as AIA New Jersey, and I will continue to do so.  In the meantime, it is now up to you to get involved and make this AIA your AIA!

Sincerely,

Justin_sig

Justin A. Mihalik AIA

2016 President

South Jersey CANstruction Event

canstructionThe Food Bank of South Jersey to host it’s second annual Canstruction event at Rutgers Camden.  They are looking for architects and engineers to participate.

Get your team together today, design and build a can structure, and help fight hunger.  Find out more information

About the Food Bank of South Jersey

The Food Bank of South Jersey (FBSJ) is based in Pennsauken, New Jersey and it exists to provide an immediate solution to the urgent problem of hunger by providing food to needy people, teaching them to eat nutritiously, and helping them to find sustainable ways to improve their lives. For the past 30 years, the Food Bank has provided relief to struggling families and vulnerable seniors who live in Burlington, Camden, Gloucester and Salem counties.

All of this is made possible because of partners like you. When you donate funds or food to FBSJ, you are making a genuine difference in people’s lives. For that, we say “Thank You!”

Information about Canstruction Pennsauken

February 10 – 22 (Please review the event schedule on the previous page)
Rutgers University, Student Campus Center ● 326 Penn Street ● Camden, NJ

Theme: Food Lovers

Team Next Steps

Your team should designate a Team Captain and Mentor. Thoroughly review the Team Captain Guidebook to become familiar with the Rules and Regulations, Design Principles, and the Design Process.

Teams should be actively procuring the cans of food necessary for a winning structure. The Food Bank has resources to help teams procure cans for use in the build.  See foodbanksj.org for additional information.

Submit Design

Tuesday, January 31: deadline for submitting design sketch, dimensions, structure title & description.

2015 South Jersey Canstruction

CANwit ARH SJ2015

Adams Rehmann & Heggan CAN-Do “Wit”

Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals – Brian Penschow

“Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals” is an eight-part series that will be published on the AIA NJ blog over the course of the month of October, AIA Emerging Professionals Month. In this series, our young professionals will chronicle the personal stories of how they were attracted to become architects — and how architecture inspires them.

epic_penshaw.jpg    Drawing Out My Inner Creativity

I like to joke with people that I came to architecture after trying accounting, anthropology, and archaeology, but that isn’t really true – my career path wasn’t nearly that simple. And while it is true that I played with legos and lincoln logs when I was a child, grew up in and around the beautiful architecture of New York City, and had a poster of the World Trade Center with the 1976 King Kong on my bedroom wall, none of those things inspired me to become an architect or even led me to architecture school.

In grade school, I wanted to be a marine biologist, but I didn’t know how to make a life out of that. (Ironically, my wife found a way; she actually teaches Marine Biology.)

As I grew older, my plans transformed and I was convinced that I would be a patent attorney, as my logic skills and gifts with mathematics and science would help me excel in that field. I planned to get an undergraduate engineering degree, and then go to law school, but none of that worked out. The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry.

While I did enter engineering school at the age of seventeen, I never finished my degree. After bouncing around several different jobs, some of which I considered possible careers, I decided to go back to school and study business, which ended up being a complete disaster. I was good at engineering, but in engineering there is one particular solution to a problem, and there is very limited room for creativity. I found business school very boring, and it’s no exaggeration to say that I was completely lost.

It wasn’t until I took my first class in architecture at my local community college that I finally felt at home. I was willing to work long hours, stay up all night, cry after brutal critiques, and even sacrifice a social life for a discipline that would allow me to use all of my skills and creativity. Architectural school, for the first time, helped me release my inner creativity that was always trying to get out.

My inspiration for becoming an architect, and for producing architecture comes from within. Finding that locus of inspiration within me is the secret to my ambition, my drive, and, in large part, to my success.

Brian Penschow, AIA

NCARB Launches ARE 5.0

The Architect Registration Examination® (ARE®) 5.0 launched November 1, 2016, and incorporates the latest testing technology.

ncarbLearn more at NCARB.com

The next version of the Architect Registration Examination® (ARE®), ARE 5.0, will launch November 1, 2016, incorporating the latest testing technologies and format that more closely aligns with modern practice. The six-division exam will include case studies that simulate real-world practice, and will be offered without a fee increase.

Developed by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), the multi-division exam is taken by all candidates seeking architectural licensure in the United States. As with all licensing exams, the ARE is updated periodically to ensure it continues to test the knowledge and skills necessary for the independent practice of architecture.

To adapt to changes in the profession, ARE 5.0 will incorporate a new division structure and the latest graphic testing methods. The exam content has been reorganized into six divisions, which are designed to reflect the phases of architectural practice—from practice management to construction and evaluation. The new divisions also align with the experience areas of the Architectural Experience Program (AXP), making the licensure process smoother and easier to understand for candidates.

Incorporating the Latest Testing Technology

The new exam will retire vignettes—a graphic question type used in the current version—and incorporate two new question types: hot spots and drag-and-place. ARE 5.0 will also include case studies to assess a candidate’s ability to synthesize multiple pieces of information. Each ARE 5.0 division will feature 80 to 120 questions comprised of these new question types, plus multiple-choice, check-all-that-apply, and fill-in-the-blank questions.

NCARB carefully develops the ARE in conjunction with hundreds of practicing architects who volunteer their time, services, and expertise to write, test, and analyze the exam. The ARE is then reviewed by experts who verify the questions are fair, reliable, and in compliance with national testing standards.

 

YAF Connection October 2016

yaf-connect_11_16The latest Young Architects Forum publication Connection has been released.
The topic is Data Driven Design.   Click on link below to the publication:

Interested in learning more about the Young Architects Forum (YAF) reach out to
the AIANJ Young Architect Regional Director Jessica O’Donnell.

Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals – Megan Pritts

megan_pritts“Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals” is an eight-part series that will be published on the AIA NJ blog over the course of the month of October, AIA Emerging Professionals Month. In this series, our young professionals will chronicle the personal stories of how they were attracted to become architects — and how architecture inspires them.

At the age of 5, I already knew I wanted to become an architect. What inspired me was the environment around me in which I grew up. Living in the suburbs, I drew variations of what I saw from houses to gardens to school buildings. I drew a house for each of my friends with vibrant colors and imaginative shapes that reflected the personality or image of them in my head.I drew each of these houses from the view of the street and later learned that one side or face of a building is called a facade. My series of facade studies started taking shape within a neighborhood where I drew landscapes, roads and driveways connecting all of the homes to other buildings like schoolhouses. I assume this progression from drawing houses to interconnected neighborhoods came from riding the school bus every day and beginning to understand how neighborhoods are planned and connected.

I would argue that anything can be inspirational for a child. I found so much inspiration from my natural surroundings and the built world I lived in that I used that to imagine new structures that would enhance the existing environment. My passion for drawing and my early imagination led me to develop a sense or ability to design at a young age.

Growing up, I never stopped sketching, designing and planning, so it was only natural for me to pursue a career in architecture.

Megan Prittsi_am_epic

AIA-NJ to Host Annual Design Conference

Oct. 20 in Somerset, N.J.

AIA New Jersey Design Conference to Include Rutgers Campus Tour, Keynote on University’s Master Plan as well as annual Design Awards

 

WHAT:            

The biggest names in New Jersey architecture will meet for a full-day architectural affair, culminating in a panel review of AIA-NJ’s annual design award submissions. In addition to the Design Awards Reception, the conference will feature a trade show as well as seminars on a range of topics, from women in architecture to emerging technologies for architects. In recognition of the 250th anniversary of Rutgers University, the opening keynote will focus on Rutgers University’s master plan, while the annual architectural tour will be a walk-through of the New Brunswick College Avenue Campus, discussing the campus’ history, recently constructed buildings and what the future holds in store.

WHO: 

Keynote 1: Frank Wong, Rutgers Executive Director of University Planning and Development on the topic of “Rutgers University Master Plan, Then and Now”

Keynote 2: Stephen Chrisman, Senior Associate at Ferguson & Shamamian Architects on the topic of “New Traditional Architecture: The Work of Ferguson & Shamamian Architects”

Keynote 4: Rick Joy, AIA, renowned architect and former visiting professor at Harvard Graduate School of Design on the topic of “Taking the Time”

 

WHEN:

      Design Conference – Thursday, October 20, 8:00 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.

 

Highlights include:

-Rutgers Keynote – 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

-“Women in Architecture” seminar – 10:15 – 11:15

-Walking Tour of Rutgers University – 10:15 – 12:15

-Design Awards Reception – October 20, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

-Showcase New Jersey Architects’ Projects – October 20, 8:00 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.

 

 WHERE:

The Palace at Somerset Park, 333 Davidson Avenue, Somerset, NJ

 

FIND MORE:

www.aia-nj.org

AIANJ: Women and Democracy Event

AIANJ Women in Architecture : Women and DemocracyWIA Final Logo

The AIANJ Women in Architecture (WIA) held the latest in its Lecture Series.  Open to all, this event focused on democracy and the local legislature.  Guest speakers Assemblywoman Valerie Vainieri Huttle, Assemblywoman Eliana Pintor Marin,  and Freeholder Tracey Silna Zur spoke at a round table discussion to members who attended.

img_0047 img_0050Join WIA at their next event to be held during the AIANJ Design Conference on October 20th.  Click to find more information and register to attend.

wia-meet-the-speakers

Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals – Matthew Pultorak, Assoc AIA

“Drawing Inspiration from our Emerging Professionals” is an eight-part series that will be published on the AIA NJ blog over the course of the month of October, AIA Emerging Professionals Month. In this series, our young professionals will chronicle the personal stories of how they were attracted to become architects — and how architecture inspires them.EPiC_Pultorak

A day at the beach

I grew up in Canarsie, Brooklyn, so for much of my childhood I played on asphalt and concrete. (There was also an occasional patch of dirt, which was invariably sprouting weeds). Finding refuge from the bustle of the busy city was rare, so my family would take fairly regular trips to the beach to alleviate the stress and wear of the city lifestyle. Although we didn’t frequent it as often as I would have liked, the beach would influence my creative side in a number of ways. As a creative professional, I look back on those trips and wonder if they had an influence on my decision to pursue a career in architecture.

The beach is a place where all five senses can be evoked, which can cause some sensory overload in a young child. All of the new feelings I experienced on the waterfront caused me to see my surroundings differently. What was a nice place for most people to lounge became my new site for childhood  construction as I designed the most intricate sand castles any architect could conjure up.

You learn about everything in life through experience, and anyone who has built a sand castle can tell you about the factors you must take into account: the wetness of the sand, proximity to the water, where the sun is coming from, if there are other people walking on your “site” and how you have to redirect the ocean water as the tide came in.

Dealing with all of these concerns, unbeknownst to me, was my first experience solving an architectural problem. The end goal was always to create the largest, most intricate sand castle, but in order to complete the project, all the other problems had to be addressed. These small details can really help a young mind develop their problem solving abilities, and from it arises a heightened sense of creativity.

While most people see the beach as a relaxing way to spend the day, it can also be used by parents as a means of developing future architects. It worked for me!

Matthew Pultorak, Assoc. AIA

Are You EPiC ?

AIA New Jersey Emerging Professional Community

AIANJ_EPiC

We are looking for members who are interested in becoming the 2017 Vice Chair and Section Directors within our Emerging Professionals Community [EPiC], which consists of architecture school graduates, AIA Associate members, and AIA members licensed for 10 years or less.

Our mission is to promote the professional growth of emerging architects and support local communities through advocacy, education, and service. Through consistent communication and coordination between the state committee and local sections throughout New Jersey, EPiC provides programming, events, and service opportunities for our members to have fun while building relationships, developing leadership skills, and increasing emerging professional’s involvement within the profession.

The Vice Chair position has a term of two years. One year as Vice Chair followed by one year as Chair. Responsibilities of the position include:
– Assisting the Chair with responsibilities, coordination and planning
– Organizing the monthly teleconference with the state EPiC Committee

– Updating website and helping to create monthly newsletters

The Section Director position has a term of one year. Responsibilities of the position include:
– Promote the EPiC mission within your local AIA NJ section
– Attend a monthly teleconference with the state EPiC Committee

– Participation in one or more committees chaired by the state At-Large Directors – Add to the social media platforms used by EPiC

As a newly revived community within the AIA, EPiC provides a great opportunity to shape the emerging professional programming at both the section and state level. Such programming includes:

Hill Day: Advocacy training and meetings with New Jersey legislators
ARE Seminars: Courses to help you pass the licensing exams
Service Opportunities: Design small impactful projects in local communities Leadership Training: Improve your skills and promote member involvement

aianj_sectionmapIf you are interested in becoming an EPiC Section Director or applying for the Vice Chair position, we would like to hear from you.

Please submit a letter of interest by e-mail to [email protected] by October 7, 2016 (500

words). Be sure to include your AIA NJ section in your letter. Although not we will accept up to two letters of support.

We look forward to your interest.

Jessica O’Donnell, AIA 2016 EPiC Chair