Category Archives: Disaster Response

5 Year Anniversary of Hurricane Sandy

AIAeagle_2016October 2017 marks the 5 year anniversary of Hurricane Sandy.

Since the storm, AIA NJ Members have taken steps to rebuild a more resilient New Jersey and have better educated themselves to protect our communities from future catastrophes.

If you have been a part of the recovery or renewal and would like to share your story or projects, please contact [email protected] to set up an interview.

Thank you!

AIA NJ takes action to protect New Jersey from New Executive Order that exposes Government Infrastructure to Flood Risk

red_eagleOn Tuesday, August 15, President Trump issued a new executive order that rolls back Obama-era protections put in place to ensure that government-funded infrastructure projects in flood prone areas would be less exposed to flooding and the effects of climate change. Read more on this executive order here.

Illya Azaroff, AIA Regional Recovery Work Group, and a resiliency expert on AIA National’s Strategic Council says, “In the northeast alone 20% of the US GDP is accounted for from the Boston-Washington corridor or megalopolis. In that same 2% of US land area 48.6 million people reside and it is all connected by a tangled web of infrastructure that is very vulnerable to immediate shocks and stresses. Since Super Storm Sandy the way forward in not only this region but around the country has progressed toward comprehensive resilient building measures that account for risks of today and those predicted in the future. To reverse Obama era directives that aim to design for climate change across political and state boundaries is to say the least a short sighted failure of leadership. I believe the health safety and welfare of the public is at greater risk without these measures in place. ”

Here in New Jersey, we still hear residents speak of the effect of Sandy on our communities, the days before compared to the way things are now.  While the Obama regulations created a new landscape for many on the Jersey Shore, those changes brought a sense of security to people, allowing them to stay in their communities rather than relocating to higher ground. Will that now be ripped out from under our neighbors?

New Jersey’s environmental groups respond to the new executive order. See comments here.

AIA NJ is not in support of the new executive order. It goes against our core values:

  • We stand for a sustainable future
  • We stand for protecting communities from the impact of climate change

President Elect Verity Frizzell, AIA says, “Yes, there is some additional cost to raising projects another 2 or 3 feet, but it is nothing compared to the cost of rebuilding after a flood.  It shouldn’t cause any delays in permitting, at all, unless the original plans weren’t drawn to the higher standard and had to be re-drawn.  It is another example of our President’s shortsightedness and operating without full knowledge of the consequences of his decisions.”

AIA NJ President, Ben Lee, AIA has issued a plan of action that is already underway, with AIA NJ representatives scheduling Summer Recess meetings with our Congressmen and Senators,  and discussions with State Legislators being planned. Our Committee on the Environment is advising on the recommended plan for our state.

 

 

Training Session for Coastal Rebuilding Program

The New Jersey Department of Community Affairs (DCA), Sandy Recovery Division is hosting a Training Session about the Reconstruction, Rehabilitation, Elevation, and Mitigation (RREM) Program and Low- to Moderate-Income (LMI) Homeowner Rebuilding Program from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Monday, May 15, at the Brigantine Community Center in Brigantine, Atlantic County.
 
Those interested in attending are asked to RSVP to me at [email protected]nj.gov at least one day prior to the Training Session to reserve their spot and to submit any suggested questions or topics they would like addressed if time permits.

Save the Date for AIA-NJ

Don’t forget to clear your calendar to attend these important AIA-NJ events…

May 19. NJ Re-Forum. Municipal Land Use Law. Details and registration here.

June 12. Architects Action Day. Register Here.

June 22. East Coast Green: Health, Safety & Wellness. Registration is open!

August 1. Community Resilience Course. Limited capacity; register here.

November 9-11. Quad States. AIA NJ Design Conference is at this event! Click here.

Community Resilience Course

Community Resilience Course
Hosted by: AIA New Jersey
August 1, 2017
8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
AIA-NJ
Join us for our Community Resilience course and learn about the meaningful actions that you and your community can take to enhance resilience to natural hazards and of the opportunities available to incorporate these actions into professional practice. Increase your understanding about community resilience (CR) and how it can benefit hazard planning, including practices of how community resilience can be enhanced at the local level. Learn about resources and tools that can assist to identify the various components of risk and strategies for integrating community resilience into existing plans and programs.

 

Location
Holiday Inn East Windsor
399 Monmouth St.
East Windsor, NJ 08520

More Information
Click Here

Register
Please utilize the registration code: 15706
For registration assistance, contact the NDPTC at 808-725-5220 or email [email protected].

All interested participants must need create a NDPTC online profile to register for the course, the online profiles can be created here.

Once a profile is created, the interested participant can select the course delivery and register to attend. If you already have a profile please log in using your credentials and then register for the course.

President’s Message – 2016 Highlights

JAM_headshotHappy New Year to all of you and I wish you a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year!  With the New Year comes a new president, Ben Lee AIA, who is very excited and has some great initiatives that promote the goals of AIA-NJ’s Strategic Plan.  I called Ben over the holiday weekend wishing him the best of luck and he knows he has my full support.  For me this has been a fabulous year as president that just went by all too fast.  As members you can rest assure that those serving on the Board of Trustees have you in mind as they represent you better then can be expected.  Without them I could not have accomplished my goals as president and I thank them for their support and their continued support for Ben Lee.  Some of our accomplishments in 2016 are as follows:

• Creation of the AIA New Jersey Center for Architecture– as a result of meetings with the six AIANJ Sections a Committee has been formed and is working toward a schedule of events to be hosted throughout the state with the Center as a “pop-up”.  I will remain closely involved as the idea of a Center has been near and dear to my heart for more than five years now and I believe this is the best vehicle for outreach to the general public.
• Resiliency/Disaster Assistance– AIANJ had its first Training of the Trainers for Disaster Assistance Training.  We now have five certified trainers here in NJ that will continue to provide training to NJ professionals.  We also held our first Hurriplantraining that provided more than twenty architects with the tools to prepare a community for a hurricane.  We will continue to work with the State Police in order to have the AIANJ Post Disaster Assessment team members registered so that in time of a declared disaster, they may be activated by the Governor.
• Lightweight Construction Materials – we continue to work with our legislators through our Task Force to educate them as to the proper use and protection of lightweight construction materials in multi-family construction.  We are committed to working with DCA on improvements to the building code as outlined in the Whitepaper issued by the Taskforce with the potential of seeing our recommendations considered in the International Building Code.
• AIANJ Large Firm Roundtable  We will continue to develop a Large Firm Roundtable so that the large firms here in NJ can discuss the issues that are unique to them.  All those firms interested in participating that have a staff of 25 or more, please contact me.
• AIANJ Scholarship Foundation  I will continue to work with the Scholarship Foundation on the formation of a new foundation to be the AIA New Jersey Foundation that will have a broader mission and be more closely aligned with AIANJ.  The Scholarship Foundation has been committed and provided thousands of dollars over the years in scholarships to NJ students attending a school of architecture and we want to see this continue as well as other programs and events that will be beneficial to members and the public.  Much thanks to the past and current Scholarship Foundation Board!
• AIANJ Governance  The Board of Trustees in our last board meeting of the year voted in favor of a new governance structure that will reduce the number of board members as well as open board seats up to individuals from the public.  In order for AIANJ to remain relevant it is important that we see and understand the public’s viewpoint on architects.  This is a big step for AIANJ and one that will allow the organization to grow and provide more for its members.

In closing, my experience over the last twelve years being involved in AIA has been priceless.  My motivation has always been to make our profession a better place to practice and to mentor and to continue to promote the profession to the public.  I like to believe that I have left my mark on my work thus far with AIA Newark & Suburban as well as AIA New Jersey, and I will continue to do so.  In the meantime, it is now up to you to get involved and make this AIA your AIA!

Sincerely,

Justin_sig

Justin A. Mihalik AIA

2016 President

Point/Counterpoint: The Jersey Shore

THIS ARCHITECT’S OPINION:

POINT/COUNTERPOINT
The Aftermath of Superstorm Sandy and The Resurrection of
THE JERSEY SHORE

HOW HIGH IS ENOUGH?

by Laurence E. Parisi, AIA

 

The residents of New Jersey are experienced with hard hitting storms which have caused death and destruction; however, Superstorm Sandy has topped them all as the most destructive hurricane ever recorded in the Garden State. Hurricanes are ranked by the number of deaths and the amount of destruction they cause. There is only one unnamed storm that landed on the Jersey Shore, in 1806, which stands second in line to Sandy. Hurricanes such as Irene, Floyd, Felix and Doria are all ranked as severe storms to have hit New Jersey. Homes were destroyed and some were swallowed by the sea; however, without hesitation the communities were rebuilt, renewed, and brought back to life and existed as the Jersey Shore we know and love without being raised fifteen feet above sea level.

Continue reading

“Hurriplan” Training Reigns on AIA New Jersey Architects

AIA-NJ HOMELAND SECURITY COMMITTEE
NEWS AND UPDATES – HURRIPLAN TRAINING
by: Laurence E. Parisi, AIA – Regional Disaster Assistance Coordinator

 

aianj_hurriplan1Recent training sponsored by The New Jersey Society of Architects was held at the Holliday Inn, in East Windsor, NJ. This two day event brought a wealth of pre-hurricane strategic planning knowledge to a community of some 60 New Jersey architects all eager to grasp valuable insight into Hurriplan. This skillfully prepared program which had its origin at the University of Hawaii is funded by FEMA and was presented by three well versed and highly knowledgeable instructors who also happen to be practicing architects. This trio of Hurriplan instructors dedicate themselves to bringing this vital knowledge based program into fruition as it relates to climate change and the ever evolving threats to coastal communities. Whether you believe it or not climate change is here.

Admittedly, when I first heard the name “Hurriplan” I questioned its validity. After a few hours into the program I realized I was mistaken. I began to visualize that the premise and concept of this program was sound, formidable and very much in line with the objectives of AIANJ’s Homeland Security mission statement.

Our first day included training on the aspects of pre-hurricane planning with a full and detailed background on specific design criteria in order to mitigate the damage that is surly caused by Cat 4 hurricanes that have graced the coastal shores of New Jersey.

The second day led us to a design charrette for a safe house for the city of Cape May proposed on a school site within the proximity of the of hurricane alley.

Presentation drawings prepared by attending architects were posted and critiques were given by the instructors on the beneficial characteristics of each design parti. Overall the designs as submitted were excellent.

As emphasized by Don Watson, FAIA, Architects should be at the forefront as leaders of a community movement to provide protection in the way of advanced planning to mitigate damages and conserve property and preserve life and the built environment.aianj_hurriplan2

Course Instructors,

Don Watson, FAIA, unassuming and the lead instructor of the Hurriplan course is a former dean of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a present professor there as well. He is also a visiting professor at the Yale School of Architecture. He is a practicing architect who has dedicated his career toward the energetic resolve of what are the bases for and of disaster mitigation.

Dean Sokotomoto,FAIA, B. Arch. University of Oregon, M. Arch. Cranbrook Academy of Art and a graduate of Yale with a degree in Environmental Design. He is a Hurriplan instructor and also is a practicing architect with offices in Hawaii and Connecticut. A forerunner and co-creator of this Hurriplan program he is a vital force with this dynamic trio.

Illya Azaroff, AIA, Hurriplan instructor is an Associate Professor at New York City College of Technology (CUNY) where he is a recognized expert in disaster mitigation and resilient building strategies. He is also a practicing architect with offices in Brooklyn, NY. Illya is very active with AIA-NY and a friend and ally to AIA-NJ. He is a forerunner in the disaster assistance program in NY and also is the AIA-NY Regional Representative. His knowledge in hurricane planning is further qualified by his undergraduate studies in meteorology.

Overall, Hurriplan is a worthwhile program for the advancement of the architectural community. Taking advantage of this and other programs offered by AIA-NJ is more than advisable it is beneficial to the relevance of your architectural practice. Look for other learning programs offered by AIA-NJ that will be coming to your knowledge community soon.

Stand Up! How to be Part of the Solution After a Disaster

When: 9:00 AM – 4:30 PM SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10

Where: At The Center  (AIANY Center for Architecture)

5.0 LU | 5.0 HSWRegin

The AIANY Design for Risk and Reconstruction Committee (DfRR) presents “Stand Up! How to Be a Part of the Solution after a Disaster,” the first annual Disaster U Workshop to discuss how architects and individuals can volunteer in the wake of natural disasters.
When Superstorm Sandy hit, thousands of volunteers came forward to assist in cleanup and recovery. In the storm’s aftermath, AIA New York and neighboring chapters put out a call to their members to volunteer in support of the city. AIA members and non-members alike wrestled with similar questions: Where and how can we volunteer? What training is needed and what risks are associated with volunteering after a disaster?
“Stand Up” will answer these questions and more for professionals and community stakeholders alike. The symposium will explain the role of government agencies, private sector companies, volunteer relief organizations, community groups, and professional societies in various volunteer and post-disaster scenarios, and will cover the types of training and education required for each sector. Understanding the various relationships and responsibilities of these groups will aid AIA members and non-members in their future volunteer efforts.
Stand Up! #StandUpNYC highlights advocacy in action, describes intersectoral relationships, and identifies gaps to provide a path to action and training opportunities.
Speakers:
Ken Curtin, Retired Federal Disaster Recovery Coordinator, FEMA
James Kendra, PhD, Associate Professor, School of Public Policy and Director of Disaster Research Center, University of Delaware
Tricia Wachtendorf, PhD, Associate Director, Disaster Research Center, University of Delaware
Joseph F. Tortorella, PE, Hon AIANY, President, Silman
Aaron Titus, Executive Director, Crisis Cleanup, NJ VOAD
Eric Bradshaw, Disaster Response Coordinator, Division of Code Enforcement and Administration, New York State Department of State
Jonas Ballreich, Human Services Emergency Preparedness Specialist, NYC Emergency Management
Diana Lopez, Esq., Emergency Services, The Salvation Army of Greater New York
Timothy G. Boyland, AIA, Partner, Vengoechea + Boyland Architecture/Urban Planning; 2015 President AIA New York State
Brian Baer, Co-founder and Executive Director, The Elevated Studio
Maxinne Leighton, Assoc. AIA, Director of Marketing and Business Development, Jaros, Baum & Bolles
Michael Premo or Rachel Falcone, Organizer, Occupy Sandy
Illya Azaroff, AIA, Founding co-chair, DfRR; Director of Design, +LAB architects and experimentation; Associate Professor, NYCCT

Organized by: AIANY Design for Risk and Reconstruction Committee aiany_dfrr-logo2

 

Understanding RREM & LMI Homeowners Rebuilding Program

RREM Outreach Flyer 5 2016