Category Archives: Environment

Information on sustainable design, green architecture, USGBC, and news from the AIA-NJ Committee on the Environment.

Oct. 24: Passive How?

AIA West Jersey General Meeting

Oct. 24, 2017: Passive How?

Attendees will learn the basics of Passive House standards from industry leaders, Scott Kelly, AIA, LEED Fellow, CPHC adn David Salamon, CPHD from ReVision Architecture  This presentation will cover best practices for designing Passive House projects, as well as lessons learned from their years of experience as Passive House Designers and Consultants.

This event has been approved for 3 HSW and 3 GBCI credits.

RSVP by October 19th to Jessica O’Donnell, AIA at [email protected] for our October General Membership Meeting on October 24th!

Come to the 2017 AIA NJ EPiC Emerging Professionals Night

Thursday, October 19, 2017Board Meeting: 4:30 pm
Social Hour: 6:00 pm
Food & Program:  7:00 pmSponsored By:
Porcelanosa USA
65 Route 17 South
Paramus , NJ 07652
Phone: 201.712.0556

www.porcelanosa-usa.comClick here for map and directions
2017 Sponsors:

Pella Windows & Doors
Platinum Sponsor

Structural Workshop, LLC 
Platinum Sponsor

KSI Professional Engineers LLC 
Silver Sponsor

Prosurance Redeker Group 
Silver Sponsor

October Member Meeting


Join us for our annual
Emerging Professionals Event
and the educational program:
“How Architects Can Lead Change for
Health and Wellness in the Built Environment”
1.5 LU/HSW
Introduction by:
Ben Lee, AIA, AIA-NJ President
Presentation by Emerging Professionals:
Michael Ferment, AIA and Andrew Lewis, AIAGenerously Sponsored by Porcelanosa


Please send your RSVP to [email protected] before 12 Noon on Monday, October 16, 2017.This event is open to members of all AIA-NJ sections, non-member NJ architects, and students, reservations required.


Economic globalization has had a major impact on population health. Our population has become increasingly overweight and obese; early onset diabetes has become more prevalent. During the same period, the cost of healthcare has skyrocketed. A more sedentary life style is becoming the norm through all age groups. Can Architects lead the change to improve health & wellness through our built environment? Architects can incorporate life cycle evidence based design and health & wellness design principles to all building types; i.e. for healthier housing, schools, workplaces, commerce and institutions.

Can Architects create healthier and more livable communities? To do this, we must venture beyond the physical boundaries of the buildings that we design. We must renew focus on the spaces between the buildings, the spaces beyond the property lines; the walking paths, bike trails, public transportation, the connections between the parks and community places, and the cultural/socioeconomic vibrancy that will create healthy and livable cities.

If we, as architects, can design and promote a healthier built environment, we can lead the change to improve the health of our population.


Ben Lee, AIA: Ben Lee is the 2017 AIA NJ President. He is a Board Certified Healthcare Architect by the ACHA, licensed to practice in 25 States and Washington DC. He is a Principal and CFO at NK Architects where he leads their national Healthcare Practice. He is an advocate for healthy & livable communities. Ben’s advocacy has included presentations to the NJ Future Redevelopment Conference, the Atlantic Health Knowledge & Networking Event, and East Coast Green Health & Wellness Conference, among others.

Michael Ferment, AIA: Mike is a Registered Architect in NJ, and has earned certifications in Evidence-Based Design and Sustainable Design. He is dedicated to understanding how the built environment impacts human health and well-being, and helping our clients incorporate Evidence-Based Design principles into their facilities. As a veteran, Mike has concentrated his focus on healthcare planning and design with special interest in Veteran’s Affairs projects. Mike was recently appointed to serve on the Board of Trustees for the Architects League of Northern New Jersey.

Andrew Lewis, AIA: Andrew is an advocate for wellness at NK Architects, where he oversees the company’s corporate wellness plan. Andrew is passionate about design, with a strong focus on building community through design. He is primarily focused on projects for Colleges & Universities.

Renovated Midcentury Modern Eero Saarinen Landmark Hill College House Reopens

Designed by renowned Finnish American architect Eero Saarinen and built in 1960, Hill College House at the University of Pennsylvania has undergone a 15-month, $80 million, LEED Gold-targeted renovation. The internationally recognized landmark will reopen to 500 student residents later this month.

The five-story, 195,000-sf brick residence has undergone a comprehensive renovation, preserving Saarinen’s revolutionary design vision for communal living with multiple public spaces at varying physical and social scales. Originally a women’s dormitory, Hill College House features an allegorical entry bridge over a landscaped “moat” and surrounding spiked metal fence. Student lounges and seminar rooms are built around a vast central atrium that overlooks a dining area on the lower level.

“In this complex and challenging renovation, Mills + Schnoering Architects has designed multiple deft interventions that accumulate into a complete refresh of this important building – one that respects and invigorates Saarinen’s design and the community life it so richly fosters,” said University Architect David Hollenberg.

Mills + Schnoering Architects of Princeton, N.J., led the design and construction team. Specialists in historic renovation, the firm previously worked on Saarinen’s Gateway Arch in Saint Louis, Mo.

“Our approach respects the original Saarinen Hill College House design, preserving its legacy,” said Mills + Schnoering Partner-in-Charge, Michael Mills, FAIA. “Our choices were inspired both by the integrity of the architecture and by the contemporary student experience, with a design meant to balance the two in a welcoming, accessible student residence.”

Features of the renovation design include:

  • Expansion of dining facilities by 50 percent, including major kitchen upgrades.
  • Restoration of the iconic “drawbridge” entrance and landscaped “moat.”
  • Removal, restoration, and refitting of over 400 windows.
  • New furniture and finishes designed to echo the building’s midcentury style and reinterpret

    Saarinen’s bold color palette and furnishings.

  • All new MEP systems and the introduction of air-conditioning.
  • Conversion of all bathrooms to individual restrooms and shower rooms.
  • Installation of LED lighting in the center atrium.
  • New elevator and lift to provide accessibility compliance.
  • Perimeter wall insulation, a new roof, and restoration of two outdoor courtyards.

    Project goals included strengthening the sense of community at the heart of Hill College House’s original design and respecting the historic significance of the building’s materials and details, by maintaining as much fabric and design intent as possible while inserting modern systems and amenities.

 

Hill by the Numbers

The renovated facility includes:

  • 261 student rooms: 206 doubles, 41 singles, 11 ADA singles, and 3 RA singles
  • 5 faculty apartments
  • 15 graduate assistant apartments
  • 161 gender-neutral bathrooms
  • 5,750 sf main dining facility
  • 300 main dining facility seats
  • 1,810 sf of private dining
  • 29,505 sf of social spaces
  • 19 atrium lounges
  • 17 corridor lounges

 


About University of Pennsylvania

The University of Pennsylvania is an Ivy League institution with 12 undergraduate, graduate and professional schools in Philadelphia, serving a diverse community of more than 20,000 students from around the world. Ranked consistently among the top 10 universities in the nation, Penn has a longstanding reputation for excellence. For more information, visit http://www.upenn.edu.

About Mills + Schnoering Architects

Mills + Schnoering Architects, LLC (M+Sa) is a full-service architectural firm with work focused on cultural buildings, public buildings, campus planning and design, and the preservation and rehabilitation of historic structures. The firm has a particular interest in the restoration, renovation, and adaptive use of midcentury modern buildings and sites. The Hill College House architectural team was led by Michael Mills, FAIA, Partner in Charge; Michael Schnoering, FAIA, Managing Partner; Alison Baxter, AIA, Project Manager; and Meredith Arms Bzdak, PhD, Interiors Coordinator and Architectural Historian. For more information, visit http://msarchitectsllc.com.

AIA NJ takes action to protect New Jersey from New Executive Order that exposes Government Infrastructure to Flood Risk

red_eagleOn Tuesday, August 15, President Trump issued a new executive order that rolls back Obama-era protections put in place to ensure that government-funded infrastructure projects in flood prone areas would be less exposed to flooding and the effects of climate change. Read more on this executive order here.

Illya Azaroff, AIA Regional Recovery Work Group, and a resiliency expert on AIA National’s Strategic Council says, “In the northeast alone 20% of the US GDP is accounted for from the Boston-Washington corridor or megalopolis. In that same 2% of US land area 48.6 million people reside and it is all connected by a tangled web of infrastructure that is very vulnerable to immediate shocks and stresses. Since Super Storm Sandy the way forward in not only this region but around the country has progressed toward comprehensive resilient building measures that account for risks of today and those predicted in the future. To reverse Obama era directives that aim to design for climate change across political and state boundaries is to say the least a short sighted failure of leadership. I believe the health safety and welfare of the public is at greater risk without these measures in place. ”

Here in New Jersey, we still hear residents speak of the effect of Sandy on our communities, the days before compared to the way things are now.  While the Obama regulations created a new landscape for many on the Jersey Shore, those changes brought a sense of security to people, allowing them to stay in their communities rather than relocating to higher ground. Will that now be ripped out from under our neighbors?

New Jersey’s environmental groups respond to the new executive order. See comments here.

AIA NJ is not in support of the new executive order. It goes against our core values:

  • We stand for a sustainable future
  • We stand for protecting communities from the impact of climate change

President Elect Verity Frizzell, AIA says, “Yes, there is some additional cost to raising projects another 2 or 3 feet, but it is nothing compared to the cost of rebuilding after a flood.  It shouldn’t cause any delays in permitting, at all, unless the original plans weren’t drawn to the higher standard and had to be re-drawn.  It is another example of our President’s shortsightedness and operating without full knowledge of the consequences of his decisions.”

AIA NJ President, Ben Lee, AIA has issued a plan of action that is already underway, with AIA NJ representatives scheduling Summer Recess meetings with our Congressmen and Senators,  and discussions with State Legislators being planned. Our Committee on the Environment is advising on the recommended plan for our state.

 

 

Architecture and the Solar Eclipse

By William J. Martin, R.A., AIA, P.P., LEED AP-Hbill headshot

 

We are about to experience one of the greatest wonders the natural world has to offer humanity.

 

In late August,  here in the New Jersey area, there will be a solar eclipse. Solar eclipses are not commonplace. They are actually very rare, especially events visible in the area of New Jersey.  This time around, the sun and the moon will provide a fairly substantial partial eclipse with about 70% of the sun covered at peak time.  This should occur about 2:44pm, local time, on August 21, 2017, and weather permitting, it will be visible throughout New Jersey.

 

A solar eclipse is a reminder from the universe that we are part of a larger environment.  As architects down here on the earth, we strive through design to make the best use of the effects of the natural world.  The occurrence of a solar eclipse visible in New Jersey is a great opportunity to discuss how architects use the movement of the sun through the sky to design better buildings.

 

Climate change, the high cost of energy, and reducing dependence on non-renewable energy sources is an important priority for professional architects.  Utilizing design strategies to reduce heat loss and heat gain allow for a reduced environmental footprint and a lower operational cost for the constructed building.  This business case for reducing the carbon footprint of buildings is strong.  It reduces the economic burden on both the building user, and the environment as a whole.

 

Our design strategies include proper layout and configuration of the buildings we design.  The layout we create responds to the north-south directions through careful building site orientation.  Our spaces are arranged within the building to take advantage of natural solar daylighting reducing dependency on artificial light thus reducing energy utilized.  We incorporate design features such as roof overhangs, that help to manage and minimize solar heat gain by shielding South facing wall surfaces during the hottest parts of the year.  Properly sized overhangs and windows also allow that same solar heat gain to enter the building at the coldest times of the year. Designing to make use of local environmental conditions just makes good design sense.

 

Roof designs can also be affected.  Architects design roof angles and slope direction to provide surfaces for photovoltaic solar panels to be installed.  We create building forms and shapes that maximize efficient renewable energy generation.

 

As architects, we play an important role in helping to reduce the effects of climate change through intelligent building design.  Architects understand how buildings can fit into the natural world and we have the skills to design buildings that will reduce, and not contribute to the negative effects of climate change.

 

This upcoming wondrous celestial event, once again, reminds us that what we do as architects is truly connected to the broader natural world in a most fundamental way.

 

https://www.aia.org/resources/77541-where-we-stand-climate-change

USGBC NJ Golf Benefit

US Green Building Council NJ’s 2017 Golf Benefit

Monday, October 16, 2017

  • When
    16-Oct-2017

    11:00 AM – 7:30 PM

  • Location
    Black Oak Golf Club, 169 Bartley Road
    Long Valley, NJ 07853

AIA NJ’s East Coast Green 2017 Conference

Protecting the Health, Safety and Welfare of the Public

20170622_101022

While our country has been watching national environmental protection erode, the AIA NJ COTE Committee has been culling their resources to create a powerhouse, one-day conference filled with industry experts, award winning architects, sustainable sponsors and continuing education.

This event is nothing new for committee chair and past president, Jason Kliwinski, AIA, LEED Fellow, but this year it may mean more than ever before.

While we have limited control over the legislative requirements pertaining to the environment, nothing is holding back architects from educating themselves on best practices that can be incorporated into all of our projects, making responsible design an office standard, and beyond that, an industry standard, with AIA Architects leading the path toward a more sustainable future for the whole planet, supported on the backs of healthy buildings, responsible manufacturing and green construction practice driven by the smart choices built into the designs of an educated, environmentally savvy AIA.

This year’s conference looked at sustainability from a different perspective, with the primary program focus on sustaining the health of the people who use our buildings.  Wellness considered and built into the building, by design.

Held on June 22, 2017, at the USGBC LEED Platinum Watershed Center in Hopewell, NJ designed by Michael Farewell, FAIA, attendees were treated to an absolutely perfect day, as we stepped into summer. Mr. Farewell led two tours, inside and out, explaining the history of the site, the basis for many of the design decisions and how the building works, from day-to-day, as well as through the seasons.  Michael was also the morning keynote speaker, presenting Two Rivers Run Through It: The Stony Brook Millstone Environmental Center.

For members interested in attaining USGBC Well Building Accreditation, a five-hour training seminar was taught by Lia Nielson of Simply Sustainable LLC and the Green Building Center, to assist attendees in preparing to take the Well Building certification exam.

Two other tracts included 8 courses associated with either Safety or Welfare:

  • Climate Reality – Effects and Solutions taught by Jason Kliwinski, AIA, LEED Fellow/ Faculty
  • Resilient Design in a Changing Environment presented by Tom Dallessio, AICP/PP/FRSA and Illya Azaroff, AIA
  • The A/E Role in Creating Good Indoor Environmental Quality, speaker Jason Kliwinski, AIA, LEED Fellow/ Faculty
  • Selecting and Specifying Healthy Materials in the Age of Product Transparency with Mark Jane Augustine
  • Meeting the new Energy Code ASHARE 90.1 & IRC 2015 with Bill Amann, PE, DCEP, LEED Fellow
  • Commissioning the Architects Role to Ensure Optimal Performance presented by Kirk Tucker
  • Show your Client the Money: ALigning Available Grants & Incentives with Project Goals by Gary Magiera and Tiffany Rolfing

and

  • Tectonics of High-Performance Design presented by David Gibson, AIA

Video clips of the programs are in production for publication on our YouTube channel. Keep a look out for announcements of their release.

 

USGBC NJ Summer Social

All AIA NJ members are invited to our annual Summer Social networking event and fundraiser.
August 9th
Martell’s Tiki Bar
Point Pleasant Beach
Funding goes to support our Annual Kids Green Education event: Each year, USGBC NJ hosts roughly 200 children (& chaperones) from not-for-profit organizations including NJ Boys and Girls Clubs, and urban summer school programs for a green education event.
USGBCNJ_SummerSocial2017

A Sustainable Engine for Innovation in Philadelphia

 

 

A Sustainable Engine for Innovation in Philadelphia

Case Study: The University of Pennsylvania’s Pennovation Center

KSS_Pennovation

The University of Pennsylvania’s new Pennovation Center is a rebel, a futurist, a disruptor. It’s a phenomenon of a building that is also a machine for sparking new growth in the fields of learning, commerce, and community across greater Philadelphia and beyond. What’s more, its bold approach to sustainability that leverages its industrial heritage as an engine for research and learning has earned it a LEED Gold rating.

Read more about Pennovation Center – Click Here.

 

Stats:

 

Pennovation stats

AIA NJ supports the passing of Senate Bill-3317

On June 26, 2017, NJ Senate passed S-3317 to require NJ to Join Climate Alliance to uphold Paris Climate Accord. AIA NJ supports the passing of this Senate Bill.

Along with AIA National, AIA NJ stands for a sustainable future and for protecting communities from the impact of climate change. 

Climate change caused by human activity remains one of the most urgent challenges of the 21st century. Rising levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases already are causing rising sea levels, extreme weather events, and degradation of natural resources. These trends are projected to continue and possibly accelerate, posing significant risks to national security, human health, food supply, global economies, and natural ecosystems; many of these result in refugee crises.

The AIA recognizes that current planning, design, construction, and real
estate practices contribute to patterns of resource consumption that will inhibit
the sustainable future of the Earth. Architects, as the leaders in design of the
built environment, are responsible to act as stewards of the Earth.
Consequently, we encourage communities to join with us in changing the
course of the planet’s future by supporting governmental and private sector
policy programs, including the development, evaluation, and use of codes,
standards and evidence-based rating systems, that promote the design,
preservation, and construction of sustainable communities and highperformance
buildings.

It is in this spirit that AIA NJ supports the passing of Senate Bill-3317 and we are looking forward to supporting the passing of coordinating Assembly Bill-5040.

SENATE, No. 3317

STATE OF NEW JERSEY

217th LEGISLATURE

INTRODUCED JUNE 15, 2017

 

Sponsored by:

Senator  BOB SMITH, District 17 (Middlesex and Somerset)

Senator  LINDA R. GREENSTEIN, District 14 (Mercer and Middlesex)

 

SYNOPSIS:      Requires NJ to join U.S. Climate Alliance to uphold Paris Climate Accord.

 

CURRENT VERSION OF TEXT:      As introduced.

An Act requiring New Jersey to join the United States Climate Alliance, and supplementing Title 26 of the Revised Statutes.

Be It Enacted by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey:

  1. The State shall join the United States Climate Alliance and uphold the Paris Climate Accord, lower greenhouse gas emissions, and address the threats posed by climate change in accordance with the goals established therefor by the alliance.

 

  1. This act shall take effect immediately.

 

STATEMENT

This bill would require New Jersey to join the United States Climate Alliance, a group formed to pursue policies to uphold the United States’ commitments to the Paris Climate Accord in order to address the threats posed by climate change.  The group was formed by the Governors of California, New York, and Washington after President Trump announced his intention to withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord.

The Paris Climate Accord, joined by 195 countries, sets forth a five-year goal of keeping the increase in global average temperature below 2 degrees centigrade above pre-industrial levels and aims to limit the increase in average global temperature to 1.5 degrees centigrade above pre-industrial levels.  The signatories to the agreement also pledge to undertake rapid reductions in greenhouse gases thereafter in accordance with best available science. Before and during the Paris conference, countries submitted comprehensive national climate action plans.  Since the formation of the U.S. Climate Alliance, the Governors of Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Virginia, as well as the Governor of Puerto Rico and the Mayor of the District of Columbia joined the alliance.  Hundreds of mayors, business leaders, and university presidents have committed to honor the goals of the Paris agreement as well.  The United States Climate Alliance is committed to upholding the Paris Climate Accord and reducing greenhouse gases in order to address the threats posed by climate change.

Current member states of the U.S. Climate Alliance comprise 36 percent of the United States population and over 30 percent of the United States gross domestic product.  The United States’ goal under the Paris Climate Accord was to reduce national emissions by 26 percent below 2005 levels by 2025.