Category Archives: Codes & Regulations

Information on codes and regulations that effect architecture in New Jersey.

ADVOCACY VALUE STATEMENT  

February 2017

AIAeagle_2016AIA New Jersey (AIANJ) is more important than ever as our country is going through transitions. Our profession has been respected by all because of our values and our commitment to improve the built environment. It is important for us to represent our membership to support or to defend these values.

 

AIA National has released 2017 Statement of our Values, AIA NJ is united in support of the national statement:

Value Statement 

In it we state our priorities:

  • We stand for equity and human rights,
  • We stand for architecture that strengthens our communities,
  • We stand for a sustainable future,
  • We stand for protecting communities from the impact of climate change,
  • We stand for economic opportunity,
  • We stand for investing in the future, and
  • We speak up, and policymakers listen.

Read more at AIA

 

AIA New Jersey

AIA NJ has our professional values that echoes the AIA National statement. As licensed Architects we are all working to advance the quality of life of built environment and protect the health, safety and welfare of the public. We also has our values formulated through the efforts of our PROFESSIONAL Committees. The following are the values and programs specifically developed in AIA NJ:

  • Sustainable Environment
  • Resiliency
  • Health & Wellness
  • Historic Resources
  • Homeland Security
  • Diversity & Women in Architecture

As we set our ADVOCACY agenda and priorities for 2017, the above values statement for AIA and AIA NJ are the most important issues for our MEMBERS.

Therefore, it is important that the Communication, Public Awareness, Legislative & Government Affairs and Membership committees all working toward the same goals.

Ben P. Lee,
AIA NJ President

Call to Action: Federal Historic Tax Credit

Call To Action:

Federal Historic Tax Credit in Danger of Repeal in Tax Reform

The incoming Trump administration and Speaker Ryan have prioritized moving tax reform legislation in the first 100 days of the new Congress, likely including eliminating tax credits and deductions.

The HTC is the most significant federal financial commitment to historic preservation. Over the last 36 years, the credit has created 2.3 million jobs, leveraged $117 billion in investment, and rehabilitated more than 41,250 buildings – all while generating enough in federal revenue to pay for itself.

Keeping the federal Historic Tax Credit is essential to a place like New Jersey.  Without it, we would loose the traction gained on complimentary state legislation that AIANJ has supported for several years – namely, the Historic Properties Reinvestment Act (HPRA).  HPRAwould piggyback on the HTC where commercial/income-earning projects are involved.  The vast majority of states in country (and all states that border NJ) already have credit programs like HPRA.  NJ’s substantial stock of older buildings cries out for this type of re-investment and the sensible growth it promotes.

the-victor-lofts-camden-nj-building-photo

Originally the RCA Victor Company’s Building 17, the Victor in Camden, NJ was made possible through the use of federal Historic Tax Credits about ten years ago

 

Contact your members of congress!

 
Call (during office hours) or email them!

Ask them to support the Historic Tax Credit as part of tax reform legislation that is expected to move through Congress. Explain the value of the HTC and ask your Members of Congress to express support to House Ways and Means Committee Chairman, Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX), and other committee members.

 

Locate the name and address of your Representative here: http://www.house.gov/representatives/find/

Locate the names and addresses of your Senators here: http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm?OrderBy=state&Sort=ASC

This link (courtesy of Preservation Action) provides a Historic Tax Credit fact sheet with key points to share with legislators:

http://www.preservationaction.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/HTC-Factsheet-2017.pdf 

Thank you for doing your part to advocate for the HTC!

Half Moon Offers NJ IRC Building Code Seminar

Review the adoption and enforcement of the New Jersey Edition of the International Residential Code (IRC).

Learn about recent and anticipated code amendments.

Examine code requirements for building planning and shell construction.

Discuss energy efficiency requirements and compliance methods.

Explore code requirements for mechanical, fuel gas, plumbing and electrical systems.

Wednesday, December 21, 2016
Holiday Inn, Cherry Hill, NJ

Instructor Daniel Scott Mascione, AIA, LEEDap

6.5 HSW AIA Learning Units
Tuition:  $ 269 per registration

More information
Offered by HalfMoon Education

 

The BIG Ask

By Jerome Leslie Eben, AIA
AIANJ Member of the ArchiPAC Steering Committee

For those who do not know, ArchiPAC is the only federal political action committee (PAC) speaking up for members of the AIA. The mission has been and continues to be to support candidates running for the US House and Senate who support AIA’s initiatives to preserve the profession and promote positive solutions for the built environment. The Stearing Committee works with both sides of the aisle and this has been a key strategy for moving the AIA’s legislative agenda through Congress.

In one way or another I have been involved with ArchiPAC for over a decade. Back in 2006 we had jus 23 donations that totaled $3,351. Our numbers of donators and individual donations have steadily increased and by the end of last year, we had raised just over $10K.

With just two and one half months left we are some $3K short of that goal. Increasing our goal, which this year was to 10% above last year’s numbers, would elevate effectiveness and compete with our counterparts in the building and construction industry. By doing so we would in effect elevate the debate on Capitol Hill by bringing awareness to the issues that impact the practice of OUR profession from tax policies that affect cash flow to energy policies that impact how buildings are designed.

The above explanation leads to the BIG ask from me to all of you to make your donation before December 31st of this year.  It is easy to do so long as your check is not a corporate one. I am especially asking our entire current and past leadership to step up and make your donation and help with the ask so others will also contribute.

You can make your donation by visiting the contribution website ArchiPAC.org or mail a check payable to ArchiPAC to AIA Headquarters at 1735 New York Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20006

Meet ARCHI

Meet ARCHI

Thank you
Jerry

[email protected]

“Hurriplan” Training Reigns on AIA New Jersey Architects

AIA-NJ HOMELAND SECURITY COMMITTEE
NEWS AND UPDATES – HURRIPLAN TRAINING
by: Laurence E. Parisi, AIA – Regional Disaster Assistance Coordinator

 

aianj_hurriplan1Recent training sponsored by The New Jersey Society of Architects was held at the Holliday Inn, in East Windsor, NJ. This two day event brought a wealth of pre-hurricane strategic planning knowledge to a community of some 60 New Jersey architects all eager to grasp valuable insight into Hurriplan. This skillfully prepared program which had its origin at the University of Hawaii is funded by FEMA and was presented by three well versed and highly knowledgeable instructors who also happen to be practicing architects. This trio of Hurriplan instructors dedicate themselves to bringing this vital knowledge based program into fruition as it relates to climate change and the ever evolving threats to coastal communities. Whether you believe it or not climate change is here.

Admittedly, when I first heard the name “Hurriplan” I questioned its validity. After a few hours into the program I realized I was mistaken. I began to visualize that the premise and concept of this program was sound, formidable and very much in line with the objectives of AIANJ’s Homeland Security mission statement.

Our first day included training on the aspects of pre-hurricane planning with a full and detailed background on specific design criteria in order to mitigate the damage that is surly caused by Cat 4 hurricanes that have graced the coastal shores of New Jersey.

The second day led us to a design charrette for a safe house for the city of Cape May proposed on a school site within the proximity of the of hurricane alley.

Presentation drawings prepared by attending architects were posted and critiques were given by the instructors on the beneficial characteristics of each design parti. Overall the designs as submitted were excellent.

As emphasized by Don Watson, FAIA, Architects should be at the forefront as leaders of a community movement to provide protection in the way of advanced planning to mitigate damages and conserve property and preserve life and the built environment.aianj_hurriplan2

Course Instructors,

Don Watson, FAIA, unassuming and the lead instructor of the Hurriplan course is a former dean of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a present professor there as well. He is also a visiting professor at the Yale School of Architecture. He is a practicing architect who has dedicated his career toward the energetic resolve of what are the bases for and of disaster mitigation.

Dean Sokotomoto,FAIA, B. Arch. University of Oregon, M. Arch. Cranbrook Academy of Art and a graduate of Yale with a degree in Environmental Design. He is a Hurriplan instructor and also is a practicing architect with offices in Hawaii and Connecticut. A forerunner and co-creator of this Hurriplan program he is a vital force with this dynamic trio.

Illya Azaroff, AIA, Hurriplan instructor is an Associate Professor at New York City College of Technology (CUNY) where he is a recognized expert in disaster mitigation and resilient building strategies. He is also a practicing architect with offices in Brooklyn, NY. Illya is very active with AIA-NY and a friend and ally to AIA-NJ. He is a forerunner in the disaster assistance program in NY and also is the AIA-NY Regional Representative. His knowledge in hurricane planning is further qualified by his undergraduate studies in meteorology.

Overall, Hurriplan is a worthwhile program for the advancement of the architectural community. Taking advantage of this and other programs offered by AIA-NJ is more than advisable it is beneficial to the relevance of your architectural practice. Look for other learning programs offered by AIA-NJ that will be coming to your knowledge community soon.

DOE Energy Code Training

ENERGY.GOV
Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy
Building Energy Codes Program

TOMORROW:  The Energy Codes Commentator

Daylighting Controls in Commercial Buildings

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program is excited to announce the next event in its Energy Code Commentator training series!

Daylighting Controls in Commercial Buildings

Featuring Rahul Athalye, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Thursday, September 8th at 1pm (eastern)

Registration is now available by clicking the above link!

What’s the Energy Code Commentator?

The DOE Building Energy Codes Program hosts a webinar-based training series called the Energy Code Commentator.  The series spans a variety of special topics of interest to all energy code stakeholders–for both residential & commercial buildings. Events will be held regularly on the second Thursday of each month at 1pm (eastern).  Check out the DOE Building Energy Codes Program training portal for the scheduled lineup and recordings of past events!

If you have suggestions for future topics or speakers, please submit them to [email protected].

 

Earth Day Irony

AIAeagle_2016By Russell A. Davidson, FAIA

As the U.S. Senate passed its long-delayed energy bill April 21, the irony was acute. Here was the world’s greatest deliberative body voting to kill carbon-cutting requirements for the federal government – on the eve of Earth Day and the signing of the COP 21 climate treaty in Paris.

In three short lines in more than 800-pages of legislation, the Senate repealed a policy that is already helping buildings owned by Uncle Sam – the nation’s largest landlord – cut greenhouse gas emissions. Specifically, the Senate voted to eliminate Section 433 from the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which requires that new and majorly renovated federal buildings meet incremental targets leading to net zero energy consumption by 2030. The House last year also voted to repeal this provision in the landmark statute, an action which President Obama at the time said he would veto.

Through design, our profession is helping guide building owners, consumers and governments – particularly Uncle Sam – to be leaders in energy conservation and reduced dependence on the use of fossil fuels. Residential and commercial buildings account for almost 40 percent of both total U.S. energy consumption and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. According to government statistics, better designed buildings have already saved our country approximately $560 billion in energy costs since 2005.

So why is Congress so determined to roll back this common-sense and money-saving provision? Section 433’s opponents (primarily the fossil fuel lobby) claim that it is simply too difficult to implement. But that ignores the realities of a market where such renovated federal buildings like the Wayne Aspinall federal courthouse in Colorado and the Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building in Portland, Ore. are meeting the 2030 targets right now. In fact, the renovated Portland building was delivered 10 months early, saving taxpayers more than $900,000 in the process.

Meanwhile, stakeholders from a broad array of industries have been working with the Energy Department to implement this rule in a way that is smart, efficient, and effective.

Requiring significant energy reduction targets in new and majorly renovated federal buildings demonstrates to the private sector that Uncle Sam can set an example for other nations to follow. The targets help spur the development of new materials, construction techniques, and technologies to make buildings more energy efficient. And they show that significant energy reductions are both practical and cost- effective.

That’s why not only architects, but more than 300 other groups oppose efforts to weaken this energy-saving policy. We hope this short- sighted repeal is stripped from any bill that emerges from a House-Senate conference. And if it isn’t, the president should veto this mis- guided legislation.

Russell A. Davidson, FAIA, is president of the American Institute of Architects.

AIANJ Lightweight Task Update

AIAeagle_2016AIA NJ President Justin Mihalik, AIA, was interviewed on May 25 on News 12 NJ regarding the AIA-NJ Taskforce on Lightweight Construction.  The task force issued it’s findings, hoping for positive changes that foster greater public safety.

Read the full article here –

WP_20160525_12_14_10_Pro-news12

Understanding RREM & LMI Homeowners Rebuilding Program

RREM Outreach Flyer 5 2016

NJ DCA Announces RREM and LMI Training Session

The New Jersey Department of Community Affairs (DCA), Sandy Recovery Division is hosting a Training Session about the Reconstruction, Rehabilitation, Elevation, and Mitigation (RREM) Program and Low- to Moderate-Income (LMI) Homeowners Rebuilding Program from 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Wednesday, March 30th, at the Moonachie Civic Center in Moonachie, Bergen County. Below, please find a flyer with additional information. This session is intended for both architects already working with homeowners in the program and those interested in working with homeowners in the program.

People interested in attending are asked to RSVP to Lisa Ryan at [email protected] at least one day prior to the Training Session to reserve their spot and to submit any suggested questions or topics they would like addressed if time permits. If you have any questions about this program, please contact Lisa Ryan.

Lisa M. Ryan
Director, Strategic Communications
Sandy Recovery Division
New Jersey Department of Community Affairs
PO Box 823
Trenton, NJ 08625-0823
(609) 292-7083
[email protected]

Builder Outreach Flyer 3-2016