Category Archives: Codes & Regulations

Information on codes and regulations that effect architecture in New Jersey.

Governor Signs Good Samaritan Bill

AIA New Jersey is pleased to announce the successful completion of one of its major legislative initiatives with the enactment of the Good Samaritan bill signed by Governor Christie yesterday. The profession will be in a position to offer its services to the people of New Jersey during a declared disaster as a first responder with the protections afforded in this statute. We want to thank our prime Sponsor Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald and sponsors Assemblymen Moriarty and Chivukula and the Governor for their support. Below is a press release regarding the bill.

AIA-NJ President Jack Purvis AIA,  along with Homeland Security Committee Chair and Past President Laurence Parisi AIA, President Elect Kurt Kalafsky AIA, and 1st Vice President Kimberly Bunn AIA at press conference with Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald.

AIA-NJ President Jack Purvis AIA, along with Homeland Security Committee Chair and Past President Laurence Parisi AIA, President Elect Kurt Kalafsky AIA, and 1st Vice President Kimberly Bunn AIA at 2013 press conference with Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald.

Greenwald, Moriarty & Chivukula Bill to Help Improve Natural Disaster Response Signed into Law

(TRENTON) – Legislation sponsored by Assembly Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, Assemblyman Paul Moriarty and Assemblyman Upendra Chivukula to improve the state’s ability to respond to large-scale natural disasters has been inked into law.

The law (A-2025) bolsters safety inspection capacity in the aftermath of disasters like Superstorm Sandy – the scale of which can easily overwhelm local governments – by shielding licensed architects and professional engineers from liability when they volunteer to help local governments respond to major natural disasters.

“Whether it’s tornadoes in Alabama, earthquakes in California or hurricanes in New Jersey, Good Samaritan laws are critical in ensuring a safe, effective and speedy response to major natural disasters,” said Greenwald (D-Camden/Burlington). “By passing a Good Samaritan law in New Jersey, we better prepare our state to respond rapidly and efficiently to the next Superstorm Sandy.”

“Not having had this protection deterred many of these professionals from volunteering their services in times of critical need, which unduly restricted our ability to quickly and effectively provide safety inspections after a large-scale disaster,” said Moriarty (D-Camden/Gloucester). “We cannot afford to go without such valuable assistance when the next big storm hits.”

“These are professionals who are willing to volunteer their time, expertise and services to help rebuild communities that have been damaged by major natural disasters,” said Chivukula (D-Middlesex/Somerset). “With the weather expected to become even more severe in the future, it will be wise to have people with expertise who are ready and able to help when the time comes.”

Nearly 400 architects stood ready to use their professional expertise to assist in assessing storm-damaged properties in New York City days after Superstorm Sandy hit, according to a 2013 Crain’s New York Business article. The specter of thousands – if not millions – of dollars in potential lawsuit liability deterred the vast majority from volunteering their assistance, leaving local officials overwhelmed by the scale of the task.

In contrast, Alabama’s Good Samaritan law, enacted in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina, was crucial in the aftermath of devastating tornadoes that in April 2011 killed 64 people and caused $2.2 billion in damage. In response to the devastating category EF-4 tornado, over 200 professionals volunteered nearly 1,300 hours in Tuscaloosa alone, inspecting over 7,000 buildings for safety–critical assistance given the municipality’s limited staff resources.

Under the law, licensed architects or professional engineers would remain liable for the full extent of damages caused by their own acts or omissions that are wanton, willful or grossly negligent.

We are very pleased that the governor has signed the Good Samaritan legislation, particularly with widespread support from both the the Assembly and Senate. By removing prohibitive regulations against building professionals, the Act will allow trained architects and other professionals to quickly and effectively respond to pressing infrastructural issues in times of emergency.  This legislation reflects the mission of the AIA to contribute its collective expertise when it is needed most, which is crucial in the planning and rebuilding of New Jersey’s communities. We commend lead sponsor and Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, along with sponsors Paul Moriarity and Upendra Chivukula, for their sound and rational advocacy of this bill.

Good Samaritan Signed Into Law

Greenwald, Moriarty & Chivukula Bill to Help Improve Natural Disaster Response Signed into Law

(TRENTON) – Legislation sponsored by Assembly Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, Assemblyman Paul Moriarty and Assemblyman Upendra Chivukula to improve the state’s ability to respond to large-scale natural disasters has been inked into law.
The law (A-2025) bolsters safety inspection capacity in the aftermath of disasters like Superstorm Sandy – the scale of which can easily overwhelm local governments – by shielding licensed architects and professional engineers from liability when they volunteer to help local governments respond to major natural disasters.
“Whether it’s tornadoes in Alabama, earthquakes in California or hurricanes in New Jersey, Good Samaritan laws are critical in ensuring a safe, effective and speedy response to major natural disasters,” said Greenwald (D-Camden/Burlington). “By passing a Good Samaritan law in New Jersey, we better prepare our state to respond rapidly and efficiently to the next Superstorm Sandy.”
“Not having had this protection deterred many of these professionals from volunteering their services in times of critical need, which unduly restricted our ability to quickly and effectively provide safety inspections after a large-scale disaster,” said Moriarty (D-Camden/Gloucester). “We cannot afford to go without such valuable assistance when the next big storm hits.”
“These are professionals who are willing to volunteer their time, expertise and services to help rebuild communities that have been damaged by major natural disasters,” said Chivukula (D-Middlesex/Somerset). “With the weather expected to become even more severe in the future, it will be wise to have people with expertise who are ready and able to help when the time comes.”
Nearly 400 architects stood ready to use their professional expertise to assist in assessing storm-damaged properties in New York City days after Superstorm Sandy hit, according to a 2013 Crain’s New York Business article. The specter of thousands – if not millions – of dollars in potential lawsuit liability deterred the vast majority from volunteering their assistance, leaving local officials overwhelmed by the scale of the task.
In contrast, Alabama’s Good Samaritan law, enacted in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina, was crucial in the aftermath of devastating tornadoes that in April 2011 killed 64 people and caused $2.2 billion in damage. In response to the devastating category EF-4 tornado, over 200 professionals volunteered nearly 1,300 hours in Tuscaloosa alone, inspecting over 7,000 buildings for safety—critical assistance given the municipality’s limited staff resources.
Under the law, licensed architects or professional engineers would remain liable for the full extent of damages caused by their own acts or omissions that are wanton, willful or grossly negligent.

SENATE PASSES MAJOR AIA-NJ LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVE

SENATE PASSES MAJOR AIA-NJ LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVE

Bill now moves to Governor Christie’s desk

Last night, the New Jersey State Senate unanimously passed A2025, a AIA-NJ-supported bill that grants immunity from liability for certain professional services rendered during emergencies under certain circumstances.

The bill was also unanimously passed by the Assembly in May, with the support of sponsors Assemblymen Lou Greenwald, Paul Moriarty, and Upendra Chivukula.

The bill now moves to Gov. Chris Christie’s desk for his signature. This is an important bill that AIA-NJ has been in support of for years. Please call or write to Gov. Christie to let him know how important this is for us:

 
Office of the Governor 
PO Box 001
Trenton, NJ 08625

609-292-6000

To send a message to the Governor online, follow

this link and select from the topic list, ‘Law & Public Safety’.

AIA-NJ

 

AIA-NJ Advanced Barrier Free Code Seminar

2014_May21

AIA NJ CODE SEMINAR

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Advanced Barrier Free -  Jack Boekhout

only space for 100 participants

Jack Boekhout’s primary business is to provide consultation on Building Codes and Accessibility Codes for Architects, Engineer’s, Contractors, Code Officials and Attorneys. Participants will be made aware of some of the fine points of Barrier Free compliance. Participants will have an opportunity to experience the problems associated with the operation of a wheelchair and crutches. The students will test the changes in level, maneuvering problems and compare them to the code text. Active participation in a wheelchair workshop is expected from all participants.

Accreditation: 

6 HSW, LU’s (Learning Units)

Event Schedule:

8:00 – 8:30 AM Registration
8:30 – 12 Noon Seminar (Part 1)
12 noon – 1:00 PM Lunch Break
1:00 – 3:30 PM Seminar (Part 2) 

Registration Rates:

Early Rates (On or Before May 9, 2014)

o AIA Member $195
o AIAS students/ AIANJ Associate Members $145
o Non-Member $250

Late Rates (after May 9, 2014)

o AIA Member $225
o AIAS students/ AIANJ Associate Members $200
o Non-Member $300

Location:

Somerset Holiday Inn
195 Davidson Road Somerset, NJ

Click Here for Registration Form

Please email registration to Laura Slomka at lslomka@njpsi.com, fax registration to 609-393-9891 or mail to: AIA NJ, 414 River View Plaza, Trenton, NJ 08611. 

Senate to Review of 179D Legislation

red_eagleA Message From AIA Government and Community Relations

 

We are hearing that the Senate Finance Committee is planning to debate legislation next week to extend tax incentives that have expired – and that the 179D energy efficient commercial building tax deduction won’t be on the list unless they hear from the public.

The 179D deduction allows building owners to claim a tax deduction of $1.80 per sq. ft. of building area to install systems that reduce the total energy and power costs by 50 percent or more. Architects across the country have used it to make commercial, high-rise multifamily residential, health care, institutional, public, and educational facilities more efficient, and it’s helped finance projects when other funding sources dried up.

Unfortunately, 179D expired at the end of 2013. The Finance Committee has told us that they will reinstate only those incentives that have broad support.  That’s why we need you to get the word out and show the Senate that 179D needs to be extended.

We need you to do the following things:
1.    Send an action alert from the AIA’s advocacy center.
2.    If your Senator is on the Finance Committee, contact their staff person ASAP to let them know that the 179D deduction is an important tool for energy efficiency. (See theSenator and staff list, as well as talking points below)
3.    Spread the word to your networks, and urge AIA members to contact their Senators.  The link above can be shared with other AIA members.

We have a good shot at getting 179D reinstated this year – but if we don’t let the Committee know we support it, it will be left out of the bill.

If you have questions, please contact Christina Finkenhofer at christinafinkenhofer@aia.org.

Thank you again for your help!

Sincerely,

Paul Mendelsohn, Hon. AIA
Vice President, Government and Community Relations

 

Disaster Recovery with Good Samaritan Bill

Watch video taken at news conference held Monday, October 28, 2013, on the need for Good Samaritan legislation in New Jersey on the one year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy.

IMG_3286Majority Leader Greenwald on Improving Future Disaster Response, Recovery with Good Samaritan Bill (A-3694)

See video here:  http://vimeo.com/78010727

Proposed Good Samaritan Legislation in Response to Hurricane Sandy

Members of AIA-NJ were at the NJ State House today in support of Good Samaritan legislation.

AIA-NJ President Jack Purvis AIA,  along with Homeland Security Committee Chair and Past President Laurence Parisi AIA, President Elect Kurt Kalafsky AIA, and 1st Vice President Kimberly Bunn AIA at press conference with Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald.

AIA-NJ President Jack Purvis AIA, along with Homeland Security Committee Chair and Past President Laurence Parisi AIA, President Elect Kurt Kalafsky AIA, and 1st Vice President Kimberly Bunn AIA at press conference with Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald.

Reprinted from: News From The Assembly Democrats

GREENWALD: GOOD SAMARITAN LAW NEEDED TO IMPROVE

RESPONSE TO THE NEXT SUPERSTORM SANDY

(TRENTON) — Joined by professional experts the day before the one year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy making landfall in New Jersey, Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald (D-Camden, Burlington) called for Good Samaritan legislation to improve the state’s ability to respond to large-scale natural disasters.

Modeled after successful approaches used in 26 other states, A3694 would bolster safety inspection capacity in the aftermath of disasters like Sandy, the scale of which can easily overwhelm local governments.

“Whether it is tornadoes in Alabama, earthquakes in California or hurricanes in New Jersey, Good Samaritan laws are critical in ensuring a safe, effective and speedy response to major natural disasters,” said Greenwald. “By passing a Good Samaritan law in New Jersey, we will better prepare our state to respond rapidly and efficiently to the next Superstorm Sandy.”

Greenwald’s legislation, A3694, would shield licensed architects and Professional Engineers from liability when they volunteer their services in response to major natural disasters. Without such protection, many of these professionals are deterred from volunteering their professional aid in times of critical need—unduly restricting the ability to quickly and effectively provide safety inspections after a large-scale disaster.

“When our communities are in crisis after a natural disaster, they need all the help they can get,” said Greenwald. “Yet the potential for massive lawsuits keeps these critically needed volunteers on the sidelines. By enacting a Good Samaritan law, we will promote public safety while greatly strengthening our state’s ability to effectively respond to disasters.”

According to a 2013 article in Crain’s New York Business, nearly 400 architects stood ready to use their professional expertise to assist in assessing storm-damaged properties in New York City days after Superstorm Sandy hit. But the specter of thousands, if not millions, of dollars in potential lawsuit liability deterred the vast majority from volunteering their assistance, leaving local officials overwhelmed by the scale of the task. Without a Good Samaritan law, New Jersey faces a similar problem.

In contrast, Alabama’s Good Samaritan law, enacted in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina, was crucial in the aftermath of devastating tornadoes that killed 64 people and caused $2.2 billion in damage in April 2011. In response to the devastating category EF-4 tornado, over 200 professionals volunteered nearly 1,300 hours in Tuscaloosa alone, inspecting over 7,000 buildings for safety—critical assistance given the municipality’s limited staff resources.

“Volunteer licensed architects have been a key component in disaster response across the country for decades,” said Jack Purvis, A.I.A., President of the American Institute of Architects, NJ Chapter. “Majority Leader Greenwald’s Good Samaritan legislation will promote better safety and more efficient disaster response for the next natural disaster that hits New Jersey.”

“When major disaster strikes, volunteer Professional Engineers stand ready to answer the call,” said Robert Thiel, P.E., President of the New Jersey Society of Professional Engineers. “Majority Leader Greenwald deserves great credit for this Good Samaritan bill, which will help New Jersey better respond to the next big storm.”

To protect property owners, licensed professionals would be shielded from liability only after meeting A3694‘s rigorous legal standards. To qualify for immunity, licensed architects or Professional Engineers must provide professional services:

* Voluntarily and without compensation;

* At the request of a federal, state or local public safety official acting in his or her official capacity;

* At the scene of a declared national, state or local emergency caused by a major hurricane, earthquake, tornado, fire, explosion, collapse or similar disaster;

* During a limited period of time after the disaster (90 days following the emergency, with extensions permitted by gubernatorial executive order under the Governor’s emergency powers)

Under the bill, licensed architects or Professional Engineers would remain liable for the full extent of damages caused by their own acts or omissions that are wanton, willful or grossly negligent.

A3694 has been referred to the Assembly Regulated Professions Committee.

President’s Message – October 2013

Purvis_2013When I first started working my way up through the officers ranks, I thought the presidency would be an easy position to hold.  You know kiss a couple of babies, cut some ribbons, easy stuff.  It is not true. This has been one of the busiest years of my life and one of the more fulfilling.  I have had the benefit of a great Executive Committee, Committee Chairs and Board of Trustees. These are the members who volunteer their time and set the agenda and direction of AIA-NJ.   It is hard work by a dedicated few.   The AIA is like the factory in the industrial park that always has the help wanted sign out front. There is always a need for our members to join committees or become officers at the section and state level. I know Kurt Kalafsky is working on his committees for next year, if there is an interest I am sure we can find a position for you.

At the Board Meeting of September the following was reviewed.

  • AIA-NJ has been working on a Good Samaritan Bill. This will allow AIA member who want to act as first responders in case of a disaster to be provided with liability insurance similar to that provided to the police. Joe Simonetta, Larry Powers and Larry Parisi, Home Land Security Chairman has been working on behalf of the AIA to get the bill through the state legislature. The will be a press release on October 29 in one of the Towns that is still being rebuild.
  • AIA-NJ Website has been undergoing rebuilding as directed by Kim Bunn and Jason Peist. A new consult is in the process of redesigning the web site and making more users friendly. It will be completed this month.
  • AIA Repositioning is something that the AIA National is in the process of doing. This is a process to restructure the AIA National to be beneficial to all of its members.  If you have gone to a current meeting you should have had a chance to choose the items that you feel will help the member make better use of their membership. Kurt Kalafsky is the chairman of this committee and making it an important part of his presidency next year.
  • Jason Peist the Associate Regional Director has been working with the State Board of Architect to get a bill past to allow Architect Interns to start taking ARE exam prior to completing their three years of internship. He is also setting study groups for the ARE.
  • The Historical Preservation Office of NJ has asked AIA-NJ to develop guidelines for raising historic structures in the new flood zones. Mike Calafati is in the progress of developing a committee to create the standards. He will be looking for members who are now work on project to get their input.

This is just a small part of what the AIA-NJ is currently working on.  Education Committee,  CANstruction, Small Firm Round Table, L&GA, NJIT Center for Resiliency,  Diversity,  Women in Architecture, Post Sandy Regional Workshop and Membership are ongoing committees.

So the next time someone asks what is the AIA doing for me, this is just a small sampling.

The AIA-NJ will be having our Design Day Conference this week. Offering continuing education classes, world class key note speakers, design competition entries, and service award winners announced. This is the high light of our profession in New Jersey. I hope to see everyone there.

Jack Purvis, AIA

2013 AIA New Jersey President

Design Conference Seminar Highlight – Codes

How do I know which code to design and who is responsible for enforcement?

This seminar will show where to find the adopted codes and the modifications in the NJ State Uniform Construction Code.  It will also outline the responsibilities for enforcement of the adopted codes so that when calling the local enforcing agency, the architect will know which Subcode Official to direct their question.

Speaker: Ronald J. Ferarri
Acting Construction Official, Parsippany Troy Hills, NJ

Credits: 1 HSW SD pending

dc2013Interested in attending this seminar – Register for the Design Conference – register for either full event or a-la-cart for individual seminars.

 

The 2013 AIA-NJ Design Conference (Oct 2nd & 3rd) will offer 15 seminars to choose from, for members to earn up to 9 CEU’s.   Three tracks  of courses to choose from including  Code Seminars, Green/ Sustainability Seminars, or Business Management Seminars.  Find out more information about the event and Register online .

 

 

AIA South Jersey & West Jersey Joint Meeting

red_eagleSAVE THE DATE – SPECIAL JOINT MEETING

AIA South Jersey/AIA West Jersey Joint Membership Meeting
Thursday, September 19, 2013

Annata Wine Bar
216 Bellevue Avenue
Hammonton, NJ 08037
Phone: 609-704-9797
www.annatawinebar.com

Cocktails: 5:00 – 6:00pm (Cash Bar)
Repositioning the AIA Discussion: 6:15 – 6:45pm
Dinner: 6:45 – 7:45pm
** Choose from: Salmon, Flank Steak, or Chicken Piccata
Member Meeting: 7:15 – 7:45pm
** Jim Del Grosso, AIA – President of AIA West Jersey
** Bruce D. Turner, AIA – President of AIA South Jersey
** Presentation of AIA West Jersey Goettlemann Award
Presentation: 7:45 – 9:45pm
Wrap Up & Door Prizes: 9:45 – 10pm

Cost:
AIA South Jersey & AIA West Jersey Members $20
Non-Members & Guests $35
Interns & AIA Associate Members FREE

Presentation:
Part 1 – “Resilient Design for a Post Sandy World”
Part 2 – “Camp Osborn Case Study – “The Rebirth of Camp Osborn a Neighborhood Destroyed by Super Storm Sandy”
by Jack Purvis, AIA and Verity Frizzell AIA
This program is pending approval for 3 CEUs

AIA South Jersey members and guests RSVP to Bruce Turner at (856) 405-0351 or by e-mail at bdtaia@aol.com. AIA West Jersey Members and guests RSVP to Jim Del Grosso at  609-923-0346 or by e-mail at j.delgrosso@comcast.net.

Please RSVP by Sunday, September 15, 2013. Please RSVP with your menu selection as noted above.

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