Category Archives: Codes & Regulations

Information on codes and regulations that effect architecture in New Jersey.

Redevelopment Forum on March 13

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New Jersey Future’s Redevelopment Forum is a daylong conference that brings together more than 500 municipal and state leaders and leading professionals in planning, development, law, transportation, architecture, construction, environmental conservation and historic preservation to share best practices and lessons learned.  We have applied for and expect to receive AIA, AICP, CLE and GBCI continuing education credits
Tickets are $110 for New Jersey Future members, municipal employees and non-profits  and $150 for non-members until February 20 (after February 20 tickets are $155 for members and $190 for non-members).
Questions: contact Marianne Jann at 609-393-0008, ext. 101.

AIA New Jersey Interviewed by WPIX TV Regarding Lightweight Wood Construction

edgewater-fire-chopper-2In the wake of the tragic events of the Avalon at Edgewater fire, Justin Mihalik, AIA, the newly elected President-Elect of the New Jersey chapter of the American Institute of Architects, was recently interviewed by WPIX TV regarding the use of lightweight wood construction.  You can see the WPIX report here. The report is 5:26 in length.  Justin’s comments start at approximately the 1:59 mark and run through the 3:00 mark.

Granted, the conversation is far more complex than can be explained in one minute of TV time. And, the issue has received significant attention, including legislation proposing mandating fire sprinklers in all residential construction (Bill A1698) and a proposed two-year moratorium on all lightweight wood construction. Given the severity of the event and the public attention, it is more important than ever that architects and AIA New Jersey have a voice in this discussion.

This issue is being actively addressed by our Codes & Standards Committee, chaired by Robert Longo, AIA, our Legistative & Government Affairs Committee, chaired by David Del Vecchio, AIA, our Public Awareness Committee, chaired by Bruce Turner, AIA, our President, Kimberly Bunn, AIA, our Executive Director, Joe Simonetta, and the Executive Committee. Therefore, please make sure you share your opinions with your leaders of AIA New Jersey and your political representatives. Architects cannot stand on the sidelines while others determine the shape of the built environment.

Bruce Turner, AIA
Public Awareness Committee Chair

Coastal Floor Mitigation Workshop

 

 

Preservation New Jersey is presenting a series of workshops on Resiliency.
Co-Sponsor: New Jersey Historic Trust

Date: March 12, 2015
Times: 2 pm – 5:30 pm (Registration begins at 1 pm)

Cost: $25.00
Pre-registration encouraged
AIA Continuing Education Credits available.

 

 

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ICC 2015 Code Updates

BOB LONGO HEADSHOT 2014On behalf of AIA NJ, I attended the NJ Uniform Construction Code Advisory Board Meeting last Friday. John Terry reported that Governor Christie signed the legislation to adopt the 2015 ICC series of codes with the amendments recommended by DCA. The proposed amendments are expected to be published in the NJ Register on January 5, 2015.

As you may be aware there is a 60 day public comment period after which some revisions are likely before the law is formally adopted. DCA estimates adoption in June or July 2015. Considering the 6 month grace period (the time in which the design professional can choose to use either code) the 2015 ICC codes should become mandatory about a year from now.

AIA NJ is planning on hosting seminars on the updates to the IBC prior to adoption next year. Stay tuned . . .

Robert M. Longo, AIA

Reciprocity With Canada

Grassroots 2009In his recent trip to Canada, Governor Christie said “I’ve gotten the impression over time, watching American foreign policy, that Canada has been an afterthought……I don’t think we pay enough attention to this relationship as Americans in general. I’ve made a very conscious decision to come to Canada and to come here to Alberta because we should treat our friends with both respect and attention.”

This statement comes on the heels of a recent tri-national agreement by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), Canadian Licensing Authorities (CALA), and the Federacion de Colegios de Architectos de la Republica Mexicana (FCARM), making it possible for architects to work across North American boarders.

With all of this in mind, it is time for the State of New Jersey to take specific action to address New Jersey’s relationship Canada relative to the practice of architecture. Specifically, the New Jersey Chapter of the American Institute of Architects renews its call for the State of New Jersey to resolve impediments to cross border licensure with Canada, and stands ready and willing to work with all relevant parties to find a workable solution for New Jersey.

RREM Seminar for Construction & Design Professionals

 

Still time to register for December 10th or December 11th RREM Seminars
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How Do You Floodproof a City?

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Governor Signs Good Samaritan Bill

AIA New Jersey is pleased to announce the successful completion of one of its major legislative initiatives with the enactment of the Good Samaritan bill signed by Governor Christie yesterday. The profession will be in a position to offer its services to the people of New Jersey during a declared disaster as a first responder with the protections afforded in this statute. We want to thank our prime Sponsor Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald and sponsors Assemblymen Moriarty and Chivukula and the Governor for their support. Below is a press release regarding the bill.

AIA-NJ President Jack Purvis AIA,  along with Homeland Security Committee Chair and Past President Laurence Parisi AIA, President Elect Kurt Kalafsky AIA, and 1st Vice President Kimberly Bunn AIA at press conference with Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald.

AIA-NJ President Jack Purvis AIA, along with Homeland Security Committee Chair and Past President Laurence Parisi AIA, President Elect Kurt Kalafsky AIA, and 1st Vice President Kimberly Bunn AIA at 2013 press conference with Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald.

Greenwald, Moriarty & Chivukula Bill to Help Improve Natural Disaster Response Signed into Law

(TRENTON) – Legislation sponsored by Assembly Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, Assemblyman Paul Moriarty and Assemblyman Upendra Chivukula to improve the state’s ability to respond to large-scale natural disasters has been inked into law.

The law (A-2025) bolsters safety inspection capacity in the aftermath of disasters like Superstorm Sandy – the scale of which can easily overwhelm local governments – by shielding licensed architects and professional engineers from liability when they volunteer to help local governments respond to major natural disasters.

“Whether it’s tornadoes in Alabama, earthquakes in California or hurricanes in New Jersey, Good Samaritan laws are critical in ensuring a safe, effective and speedy response to major natural disasters,” said Greenwald (D-Camden/Burlington). “By passing a Good Samaritan law in New Jersey, we better prepare our state to respond rapidly and efficiently to the next Superstorm Sandy.”

“Not having had this protection deterred many of these professionals from volunteering their services in times of critical need, which unduly restricted our ability to quickly and effectively provide safety inspections after a large-scale disaster,” said Moriarty (D-Camden/Gloucester). “We cannot afford to go without such valuable assistance when the next big storm hits.”

“These are professionals who are willing to volunteer their time, expertise and services to help rebuild communities that have been damaged by major natural disasters,” said Chivukula (D-Middlesex/Somerset). “With the weather expected to become even more severe in the future, it will be wise to have people with expertise who are ready and able to help when the time comes.”

Nearly 400 architects stood ready to use their professional expertise to assist in assessing storm-damaged properties in New York City days after Superstorm Sandy hit, according to a 2013 Crain’s New York Business article. The specter of thousands – if not millions – of dollars in potential lawsuit liability deterred the vast majority from volunteering their assistance, leaving local officials overwhelmed by the scale of the task.

In contrast, Alabama’s Good Samaritan law, enacted in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina, was crucial in the aftermath of devastating tornadoes that in April 2011 killed 64 people and caused $2.2 billion in damage. In response to the devastating category EF-4 tornado, over 200 professionals volunteered nearly 1,300 hours in Tuscaloosa alone, inspecting over 7,000 buildings for safety–critical assistance given the municipality’s limited staff resources.

Under the law, licensed architects or professional engineers would remain liable for the full extent of damages caused by their own acts or omissions that are wanton, willful or grossly negligent.

We are very pleased that the governor has signed the Good Samaritan legislation, particularly with widespread support from both the the Assembly and Senate. By removing prohibitive regulations against building professionals, the Act will allow trained architects and other professionals to quickly and effectively respond to pressing infrastructural issues in times of emergency.  This legislation reflects the mission of the AIA to contribute its collective expertise when it is needed most, which is crucial in the planning and rebuilding of New Jersey’s communities. We commend lead sponsor and Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, along with sponsors Paul Moriarity and Upendra Chivukula, for their sound and rational advocacy of this bill.

Good Samaritan Signed Into Law

Greenwald, Moriarty & Chivukula Bill to Help Improve Natural Disaster Response Signed into Law

(TRENTON) – Legislation sponsored by Assembly Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, Assemblyman Paul Moriarty and Assemblyman Upendra Chivukula to improve the state’s ability to respond to large-scale natural disasters has been inked into law.
The law (A-2025) bolsters safety inspection capacity in the aftermath of disasters like Superstorm Sandy – the scale of which can easily overwhelm local governments – by shielding licensed architects and professional engineers from liability when they volunteer to help local governments respond to major natural disasters.
“Whether it’s tornadoes in Alabama, earthquakes in California or hurricanes in New Jersey, Good Samaritan laws are critical in ensuring a safe, effective and speedy response to major natural disasters,” said Greenwald (D-Camden/Burlington). “By passing a Good Samaritan law in New Jersey, we better prepare our state to respond rapidly and efficiently to the next Superstorm Sandy.”
“Not having had this protection deterred many of these professionals from volunteering their services in times of critical need, which unduly restricted our ability to quickly and effectively provide safety inspections after a large-scale disaster,” said Moriarty (D-Camden/Gloucester). “We cannot afford to go without such valuable assistance when the next big storm hits.”
“These are professionals who are willing to volunteer their time, expertise and services to help rebuild communities that have been damaged by major natural disasters,” said Chivukula (D-Middlesex/Somerset). “With the weather expected to become even more severe in the future, it will be wise to have people with expertise who are ready and able to help when the time comes.”
Nearly 400 architects stood ready to use their professional expertise to assist in assessing storm-damaged properties in New York City days after Superstorm Sandy hit, according to a 2013 Crain’s New York Business article. The specter of thousands – if not millions – of dollars in potential lawsuit liability deterred the vast majority from volunteering their assistance, leaving local officials overwhelmed by the scale of the task.
In contrast, Alabama’s Good Samaritan law, enacted in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina, was crucial in the aftermath of devastating tornadoes that in April 2011 killed 64 people and caused $2.2 billion in damage. In response to the devastating category EF-4 tornado, over 200 professionals volunteered nearly 1,300 hours in Tuscaloosa alone, inspecting over 7,000 buildings for safety—critical assistance given the municipality’s limited staff resources.
Under the law, licensed architects or professional engineers would remain liable for the full extent of damages caused by their own acts or omissions that are wanton, willful or grossly negligent.

SENATE PASSES MAJOR AIA-NJ LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVE

SENATE PASSES MAJOR AIA-NJ LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVE

Bill now moves to Governor Christie’s desk

Last night, the New Jersey State Senate unanimously passed A2025, a AIA-NJ-supported bill that grants immunity from liability for certain professional services rendered during emergencies under certain circumstances.

The bill was also unanimously passed by the Assembly in May, with the support of sponsors Assemblymen Lou Greenwald, Paul Moriarty, and Upendra Chivukula.

The bill now moves to Gov. Chris Christie’s desk for his signature. This is an important bill that AIA-NJ has been in support of for years. Please call or write to Gov. Christie to let him know how important this is for us:

 
Office of the Governor 
PO Box 001
Trenton, NJ 08625

609-292-6000

To send a message to the Governor online, follow

this link and select from the topic list, ‘Law & Public Safety’.

AIA-NJ

 

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