Category Archives: Codes & Regulations

Information on codes and regulations that effect architecture in New Jersey.

ICC 2015 Code Updates

BOB LONGO HEADSHOT 2014On behalf of AIA NJ, I attended the NJ Uniform Construction Code Advisory Board Meeting last Friday. John Terry reported that Governor Christie signed the legislation to adopt the 2015 ICC series of codes with the amendments recommended by DCA. The proposed amendments are expected to be published in the NJ Register on January 5, 2015.

As you may be aware there is a 60 day public comment period after which some revisions are likely before the law is formally adopted. DCA estimates adoption in June or July 2015. Considering the 6 month grace period (the time in which the design professional can choose to use either code) the 2015 ICC codes should become mandatory about a year from now.

AIA NJ is planning on hosting seminars on the updates to the IBC prior to adoption next year. Stay tuned . . .

Robert M. Longo, AIA

Reciprocity With Canada

Grassroots 2009In his recent trip to Canada, Governor Christie said “I’ve gotten the impression over time, watching American foreign policy, that Canada has been an afterthought……I don’t think we pay enough attention to this relationship as Americans in general. I’ve made a very conscious decision to come to Canada and to come here to Alberta because we should treat our friends with both respect and attention.”

This statement comes on the heels of a recent tri-national agreement by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), Canadian Licensing Authorities (CALA), and the Federacion de Colegios de Architectos de la Republica Mexicana (FCARM), making it possible for architects to work across North American boarders.

With all of this in mind, it is time for the State of New Jersey to take specific action to address New Jersey’s relationship Canada relative to the practice of architecture. Specifically, the New Jersey Chapter of the American Institute of Architects renews its call for the State of New Jersey to resolve impediments to cross border licensure with Canada, and stands ready and willing to work with all relevant parties to find a workable solution for New Jersey.

RREM Seminar for Construction & Design Professionals

 

Still time to register for December 10th or December 11th RREM Seminars
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How Do You Floodproof a City?

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Governor Signs Good Samaritan Bill

AIA New Jersey is pleased to announce the successful completion of one of its major legislative initiatives with the enactment of the Good Samaritan bill signed by Governor Christie yesterday. The profession will be in a position to offer its services to the people of New Jersey during a declared disaster as a first responder with the protections afforded in this statute. We want to thank our prime Sponsor Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald and sponsors Assemblymen Moriarty and Chivukula and the Governor for their support. Below is a press release regarding the bill.

AIA-NJ President Jack Purvis AIA,  along with Homeland Security Committee Chair and Past President Laurence Parisi AIA, President Elect Kurt Kalafsky AIA, and 1st Vice President Kimberly Bunn AIA at press conference with Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald.

AIA-NJ President Jack Purvis AIA, along with Homeland Security Committee Chair and Past President Laurence Parisi AIA, President Elect Kurt Kalafsky AIA, and 1st Vice President Kimberly Bunn AIA at 2013 press conference with Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald.

Greenwald, Moriarty & Chivukula Bill to Help Improve Natural Disaster Response Signed into Law

(TRENTON) – Legislation sponsored by Assembly Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, Assemblyman Paul Moriarty and Assemblyman Upendra Chivukula to improve the state’s ability to respond to large-scale natural disasters has been inked into law.

The law (A-2025) bolsters safety inspection capacity in the aftermath of disasters like Superstorm Sandy – the scale of which can easily overwhelm local governments – by shielding licensed architects and professional engineers from liability when they volunteer to help local governments respond to major natural disasters.

“Whether it’s tornadoes in Alabama, earthquakes in California or hurricanes in New Jersey, Good Samaritan laws are critical in ensuring a safe, effective and speedy response to major natural disasters,” said Greenwald (D-Camden/Burlington). “By passing a Good Samaritan law in New Jersey, we better prepare our state to respond rapidly and efficiently to the next Superstorm Sandy.”

“Not having had this protection deterred many of these professionals from volunteering their services in times of critical need, which unduly restricted our ability to quickly and effectively provide safety inspections after a large-scale disaster,” said Moriarty (D-Camden/Gloucester). “We cannot afford to go without such valuable assistance when the next big storm hits.”

“These are professionals who are willing to volunteer their time, expertise and services to help rebuild communities that have been damaged by major natural disasters,” said Chivukula (D-Middlesex/Somerset). “With the weather expected to become even more severe in the future, it will be wise to have people with expertise who are ready and able to help when the time comes.”

Nearly 400 architects stood ready to use their professional expertise to assist in assessing storm-damaged properties in New York City days after Superstorm Sandy hit, according to a 2013 Crain’s New York Business article. The specter of thousands – if not millions – of dollars in potential lawsuit liability deterred the vast majority from volunteering their assistance, leaving local officials overwhelmed by the scale of the task.

In contrast, Alabama’s Good Samaritan law, enacted in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina, was crucial in the aftermath of devastating tornadoes that in April 2011 killed 64 people and caused $2.2 billion in damage. In response to the devastating category EF-4 tornado, over 200 professionals volunteered nearly 1,300 hours in Tuscaloosa alone, inspecting over 7,000 buildings for safety–critical assistance given the municipality’s limited staff resources.

Under the law, licensed architects or professional engineers would remain liable for the full extent of damages caused by their own acts or omissions that are wanton, willful or grossly negligent.

We are very pleased that the governor has signed the Good Samaritan legislation, particularly with widespread support from both the the Assembly and Senate. By removing prohibitive regulations against building professionals, the Act will allow trained architects and other professionals to quickly and effectively respond to pressing infrastructural issues in times of emergency.  This legislation reflects the mission of the AIA to contribute its collective expertise when it is needed most, which is crucial in the planning and rebuilding of New Jersey’s communities. We commend lead sponsor and Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, along with sponsors Paul Moriarity and Upendra Chivukula, for their sound and rational advocacy of this bill.

Good Samaritan Signed Into Law

Greenwald, Moriarty & Chivukula Bill to Help Improve Natural Disaster Response Signed into Law

(TRENTON) – Legislation sponsored by Assembly Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, Assemblyman Paul Moriarty and Assemblyman Upendra Chivukula to improve the state’s ability to respond to large-scale natural disasters has been inked into law.
The law (A-2025) bolsters safety inspection capacity in the aftermath of disasters like Superstorm Sandy – the scale of which can easily overwhelm local governments – by shielding licensed architects and professional engineers from liability when they volunteer to help local governments respond to major natural disasters.
“Whether it’s tornadoes in Alabama, earthquakes in California or hurricanes in New Jersey, Good Samaritan laws are critical in ensuring a safe, effective and speedy response to major natural disasters,” said Greenwald (D-Camden/Burlington). “By passing a Good Samaritan law in New Jersey, we better prepare our state to respond rapidly and efficiently to the next Superstorm Sandy.”
“Not having had this protection deterred many of these professionals from volunteering their services in times of critical need, which unduly restricted our ability to quickly and effectively provide safety inspections after a large-scale disaster,” said Moriarty (D-Camden/Gloucester). “We cannot afford to go without such valuable assistance when the next big storm hits.”
“These are professionals who are willing to volunteer their time, expertise and services to help rebuild communities that have been damaged by major natural disasters,” said Chivukula (D-Middlesex/Somerset). “With the weather expected to become even more severe in the future, it will be wise to have people with expertise who are ready and able to help when the time comes.”
Nearly 400 architects stood ready to use their professional expertise to assist in assessing storm-damaged properties in New York City days after Superstorm Sandy hit, according to a 2013 Crain’s New York Business article. The specter of thousands – if not millions – of dollars in potential lawsuit liability deterred the vast majority from volunteering their assistance, leaving local officials overwhelmed by the scale of the task.
In contrast, Alabama’s Good Samaritan law, enacted in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina, was crucial in the aftermath of devastating tornadoes that in April 2011 killed 64 people and caused $2.2 billion in damage. In response to the devastating category EF-4 tornado, over 200 professionals volunteered nearly 1,300 hours in Tuscaloosa alone, inspecting over 7,000 buildings for safety—critical assistance given the municipality’s limited staff resources.
Under the law, licensed architects or professional engineers would remain liable for the full extent of damages caused by their own acts or omissions that are wanton, willful or grossly negligent.

SENATE PASSES MAJOR AIA-NJ LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVE

SENATE PASSES MAJOR AIA-NJ LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVE

Bill now moves to Governor Christie’s desk

Last night, the New Jersey State Senate unanimously passed A2025, a AIA-NJ-supported bill that grants immunity from liability for certain professional services rendered during emergencies under certain circumstances.

The bill was also unanimously passed by the Assembly in May, with the support of sponsors Assemblymen Lou Greenwald, Paul Moriarty, and Upendra Chivukula.

The bill now moves to Gov. Chris Christie’s desk for his signature. This is an important bill that AIA-NJ has been in support of for years. Please call or write to Gov. Christie to let him know how important this is for us:

 
Office of the Governor 
PO Box 001
Trenton, NJ 08625

609-292-6000

To send a message to the Governor online, follow

this link and select from the topic list, ‘Law & Public Safety’.

AIA-NJ

 

AIA-NJ Advanced Barrier Free Code Seminar

2014_May21

AIA NJ CODE SEMINAR

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Advanced Barrier Free -  Jack Boekhout

only space for 100 participants

Jack Boekhout’s primary business is to provide consultation on Building Codes and Accessibility Codes for Architects, Engineer’s, Contractors, Code Officials and Attorneys. Participants will be made aware of some of the fine points of Barrier Free compliance. Participants will have an opportunity to experience the problems associated with the operation of a wheelchair and crutches. The students will test the changes in level, maneuvering problems and compare them to the code text. Active participation in a wheelchair workshop is expected from all participants.

Accreditation: 

6 HSW, LU’s (Learning Units)

Event Schedule:

8:00 – 8:30 AM Registration
8:30 – 12 Noon Seminar (Part 1)
12 noon – 1:00 PM Lunch Break
1:00 – 3:30 PM Seminar (Part 2) 

Registration Rates:

Early Rates (On or Before May 9, 2014)

o AIA Member $195
o AIAS students/ AIANJ Associate Members $145
o Non-Member $250

Late Rates (after May 9, 2014)

o AIA Member $225
o AIAS students/ AIANJ Associate Members $200
o Non-Member $300

Location:

Somerset Holiday Inn
195 Davidson Road Somerset, NJ

Click Here for Registration Form

Please email registration to Laura Slomka at lslomka@njpsi.com, fax registration to 609-393-9891 or mail to: AIA NJ, 414 River View Plaza, Trenton, NJ 08611. 

Senate to Review of 179D Legislation

red_eagleA Message From AIA Government and Community Relations

 

We are hearing that the Senate Finance Committee is planning to debate legislation next week to extend tax incentives that have expired – and that the 179D energy efficient commercial building tax deduction won’t be on the list unless they hear from the public.

The 179D deduction allows building owners to claim a tax deduction of $1.80 per sq. ft. of building area to install systems that reduce the total energy and power costs by 50 percent or more. Architects across the country have used it to make commercial, high-rise multifamily residential, health care, institutional, public, and educational facilities more efficient, and it’s helped finance projects when other funding sources dried up.

Unfortunately, 179D expired at the end of 2013. The Finance Committee has told us that they will reinstate only those incentives that have broad support.  That’s why we need you to get the word out and show the Senate that 179D needs to be extended.

We need you to do the following things:
1.    Send an action alert from the AIA’s advocacy center.
2.    If your Senator is on the Finance Committee, contact their staff person ASAP to let them know that the 179D deduction is an important tool for energy efficiency. (See theSenator and staff list, as well as talking points below)
3.    Spread the word to your networks, and urge AIA members to contact their Senators.  The link above can be shared with other AIA members.

We have a good shot at getting 179D reinstated this year – but if we don’t let the Committee know we support it, it will be left out of the bill.

If you have questions, please contact Christina Finkenhofer at christinafinkenhofer@aia.org.

Thank you again for your help!

Sincerely,

Paul Mendelsohn, Hon. AIA
Vice President, Government and Community Relations

 

Disaster Recovery with Good Samaritan Bill

Watch video taken at news conference held Monday, October 28, 2013, on the need for Good Samaritan legislation in New Jersey on the one year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy.

IMG_3286Majority Leader Greenwald on Improving Future Disaster Response, Recovery with Good Samaritan Bill (A-3694)

See video here:  http://vimeo.com/78010727

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