Category Archives: Architecture in NJ

Architects Action Day – New Date

Due to a change in the NJ legislative schedule AIA NJ Architects Action Day will be postponed until November 2017. We apologize for any inconvenience and hope you will be able to join us this fall.

Do you want your voice to be heard?

Take a stand to preserve the common values we share in our profession.

When Architects speak up,
policy makers listen.

Join AIA New Jersey
for Architects Action Day
on June 12, 2017!

This full day event will be held at the New Jersey State House in Trenton.

All are welcome to attend. No prior legislative experience is needed.

Learn More – Speak Up – Click Here –

Spiezle Architectural Group Move to New Headquarters

Spiezle Architectural Group Announces Move to New Headquarters in Hamilton, New Jersey from Longtime Trenton Location

New Space Accommodates Increased Services, Staff and Design Capabilities

 

Spiezle Architectural Group, Inc., an award-winning, full-service architectural, interior design and planning firm, announces that it is moving its headquarters from Trenton, New Jersey to a new location at 1395 Yardville Hamilton Square Road, Suite 2A, Hamilton, New Jersey.  Responding to continued growth, the Spiezle team designed a modern, more efficient space to accommodate increased services, staff, and a strengthened focus on the design side of its business.

 

The expanded Hamilton headquarters, an open-layout, contemporary space of approximately 15,000 square feet, was built to fulfill the needs of the firm’s latest growth, including Landscape Architecture and Interior Design, and the additional employees necessary to support them, as well as the continuing development of the firm’s markets in education, senior living, acute healthcare, government, commercial, hospitality, and not-for-profit.  The office was configured for optimal efficiency with all staff housed on one floor versus the previous three floors. Driving its vision for sustained expansion, the office can house an estimated 60 employees, including a build-out potential for future expansion.

 

“We are pleased to be establishing our new home in Hamilton and look forward to becoming an integral partner within the community,” said Thomas S. Perrino, president and CEO.  “Our enhanced space provides us with the ideal atmosphere to fulfill our ongoing mission to continue serving our valued clients and to develop new relationships for years to come.”

 

A state-of-the-art work environment, the office is built to inspire transparency, collaboration and creativity among professionals through a combination of open work spaces and smaller gathering areas critical to the spectrum of daily activities.  Natural light and daylighting are the driving elements for the office layout. Daylighting is the practice of placing windows or other openings and reflective surfaces so that natural light provides effective internal lighting. For example, Spiezle incorporated dimming capabilities to reduce energy usage when daylighting allows, and the furniture was specifically designed with a low horizon allowing natural light to flood the space. To encourage innovation, the creative team is strategically placed in areas along the office perimeter facing windows to optimize exposure to the natural lighting.  Senior executives enjoy open offices and “hoteling rooms” built to host private meetings or conversations.  Additional elements include a fully-equipped pantry and a small gym with a shower room.

 

“The design of our new headquarters was the ultimate collaboration engaging the extraordinary talents of all our professionals,” said Mr. Perrino. “We solicited ideas, needs and requirements from our entire staff, culminating in a space that is a true reflection of our intensely creative and team-oriented culture.”

 

 

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About Spiezle Architectural Group

Spiezle Architectural Group is an award-winning, full-service architectural and planning firm. Founded in 1954, the firm is known for innovative design, financially responsible solutions and personalized service. Spiezle serves academic, senior living, acute health care, corporate/commercial, government, hospitality, recreational and religious clients. Learn more at www.spiezle.com.

EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW: NJ State Historic Preservation Awards TONIGHT!

062016#14Local Project Receives Prestigious Historic Preservation Award

The Millington Schoolhouse/Old Town Hall in Long Hill Township, NJ will be presented a 2017 New Jersey Historic Preservation Award on May 11, 2017.  The coveted award will be presented at a ceremony at the Burlington County Olde Courthouse to six preservation projects from across New Jersey.

“These awards are our chance to honor the many private individuals, organizations and corporations; and state, county and local governments who work hard to preserve New Jersey’s historic places,” said Katherine Marcopul, Administrator and Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer.  “It is inspiring to see citizens taking action to preserve New Jersey’s historic resources!”

The Millington Schoolhouse/Old Town Hall landmark building has served the community since its initial construction over 200 years ago.  Adapting to local needs and growth, the structure grew with several additions to become a library, and then the town hall.  It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

This award-winning rehabilitation of the structure is guided by a preservation plan developed by Clarke Caton Hintz, with AIA NJ Past President, Michael Hanrahan, AIA, as project manager and includes retention of the original school room, which will serve as open community meeting space and an exhibition gallery.

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The annual NJ Historic Preservation Awards honor projects, groups or persons, dedicated to preserving New Jersey’s history.  This year marks the 27th anniversary of the awards celebrating May as National Preservation Month.  The Awards are presented by the NJ State Historic Preservation Office in the Department of Environmental Protection, and the NJ Historic Sites Council.

For more information about the NJ Historic Preservation Awards Program, contact Kat Cannelongo at (609) 984-0543.

In Memoriam: Gabriel A. Calenda AIA

Gabriel A. Calenda A.I.A. architect Gabriel A. Calenda, 84, of Clark, N.J., formerly of Mountainside, N.J., entered into eternal rest on Thursday, April 27, 2017, surrounded by his loving family.
Gabe was born in New York City, N.Y., to Joseph and Mary (Russo) Calenda. He graduated from Belleville High School and proudly served his country in the Navy during the Korean War. He graduated from Columbia University and Newark College of Engineering (now NJIT). Gabe was a New Jersey registered architect, starting his practice in Springfield, N.J., and was most recently in Kenilworth, N.J. He was a past president of the Newark and Suburban Chapter of the American Institute of Architects.
Gabe was predeceased by his beloved wife of 52 years, Marie (DeFalco) Calenda, and his brothers, Anthony and George Calenda. He is survived by his two loving daughters, Lisa Cikowski and her husband, Dr. Edward Cikowski, and Leslie Olear and her husband, Jeff Olear; four adoring grandsons, Mark Cikowski, Christopher Cikowski, Scott Cikowski, and Jordan Olear, and many caring nieces and nephews. Gabe was a great man, loving father and grandfather, and a friend to many.
In lieu of flowers, please make a donation in his memory to the American Cancer Society , 986 Springfield Ave., Springfield, N.J. 07081.
To offer condolences, please visit walterjohnsonfh.com.
 Published in Star-Ledger from Apr. 29 to May 1, 2017See more.

Bergen County is Celebrating National Historic Preservation Month and you are invited!

award-announce-02228_001In celebration of May 2017 National Historic Preservation Month, Bergen County will hold the 2017 Historic Preservation Commendation Awards on Thursday, May 4th at 7:00 p.m. at the historic St. Paul’s Episcopal Church located at 113 Engle Street, Englewood, NJ.
The 2017 Awards will be presented by Bergen County Executive James J. Tedesco III, Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders, the Historic Preservation Advisory Board and the Division of Cultural and Historic Affairs. A reception will follow the ceremony.
The public is invited to the program and reception. All are welcome.
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Advisory Board Member William J. Martin, AIA will Emcee the event on behalf of the Historic Preservation Advisory Board. The 12 member board is well stocked with AIA members, volunteering their time and expertise to promote and protect the culture and history of Bergen County. Bill is joined by Board Chairman Bruce A. Barton, AIA, Matthew Wolchko, AIA and John Cohen, AIA.
 
The Bergen County Historic Preservation Advisory Board serves as a resource to the Division of Cultural and Historic Affairs and to the County Executive and the Freeholders on historic preservation policy, interpretive programs, operation of county historic sites and facilities, preparation of a County Preservation Master Plan, and on acquisition and preservation of properties as county-owned historic sites. The board reviews applications and recommends funding for the Historic Preservation Trust Fund component of the BC Open Space Trust Fund, sponsors the annual County Historic Preservation Awards, reviews construction and development applications from the public and private sectors that may impact historic sites, sponsors educational seminars pertaining to preservation subjects, and, when requested, provides technical assistance on historic preservation to municipalities and private individuals. 

AIA South Jersey Member, Catherine Lorentz, AIA is featured in the news

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The Press of Atlantic City has featured Catherine’s home restoration project in their April Home and Garden section. Congratulations, Catherine, from your colleagues at AIA NJ. AC PRESS-1 copyAC PRESS-2

YAF Connection – Spring 2017

The focus of this quarter’s publication is Sheltering where AIA New Jersey’s Stephen Schoch, AIA, LEED-AP BD+C from Kitchen & Associates was a contributing writer.

YAF Connection is a quarterly publication created by members of the AIA Young Architects Forum, a community of Architects licensed less then ten years.

Interested in contributing for an upcoming publication? Topics include Global Practice, humanitarian work and the theme of Certification. Contact your YAF Regional Representative Jessica O’Donnell, AIA, for more information on article requirements.

WE GOT ONE!

By Jerome L Eben, FAIA

 

The line “we got one” comes from the 1984 film Ghostbusters.  I chose this as the title of this article after reading another article about the world’s first film studio, hence a connection to film.  The article appeared in my home town weekly, the West Orange Chronicle.  I look forward to reading this paper every week and normally turn first to an always interesting article about the township’s history.  Joseph Fagan is the author and serves as the official historian of West Orange.  West Orange like the AIA is nearly 160 years old. While on the National Board (2011-1013) I often spoke, and was extremely proud of the township’s architectural history.  Three of our founders were very much involved in designing and supervising some of the early architecture, that was built .  Richard Upjohn, FAIA designed two churches and Calvert Vaux, AIA and A.J. Davis, AIA were helped Fredrick Law Olmstead with the design of the first planned community in the nation call Llewelyn Park.

We all read stories in our local weeklies that will from time to time speak about architecture and planning.  I have found that most always the architect that is responsible for created these buildings is not mentioned.   Joe Fagan is a friend of mine and I sent him an E-mail after he wrote a beautiful story about two old school buildings in town and did not mention who the architects were.  Joe wrote back to me that he “is not qualified or well versed in architectural nomenclature to know the unique differences, so he keeps it simple.”  I told him where to find the architect’s name in the future and if he still has a hard time, to contact the West Orange Historic Commission. Marty Feitlowitz, AIA, is Vice Chairman and I am sure that he would be helpful in securing for him any information he requires about the architect of a specific building in town.

Joe’s article was entitled World’s first film studio in WO spawned global industry.  He described an oddly shaped small black building that sits behind a fence near the entrance of the Thomas Edison National Historical Park.  Joe went on to explain that the original building was built in 1893 and served as the first motion picture studio.  Called the “Black Maria,” because working inside it was like being in a police van, also referred to as black Marias.  The building was mounted on a circular track so that it could move with the sun, because the film speed was so slow that only natural sunlight would work in the production of these early films.

In this article, Joe gave credit to Bernard Grad, AIA a Newark Architect, who designed a replacement black Maria, in 1954, for the National Park Service.  This Black Maria still stands there today.  Maybe you and your children or grandchildren have visited it?

I immediately sent Joe an E-mail thanking him for providing the architectural credit, and so proclaiming in the spirit of when the Annie Potts announces to the Ghostbusters, “WE GOT ONE,” when a fancy Manhattan hotel calls asking for the ghost exterminating specialists.

Joe Fagan, is ONE journalist who now knows that when he writes about history and it includes the mentioning of a building, we can be sure that the proper credit of the architect’s name will appear in the article.

You can get involved in this educational process, by pointing out to your local journalists who might write about a building…………any building, that the proper credit should be given to the architect who designed it.  Should the architect not be mentioned, take five minutes and write an E-mail to that journalist and remind him/her that “every building has an architect, or should have one!”   If each of the nearly 2,000 of you takes on this charge, we will begin to have more of them and state that we have TWO, THREE, or MORE journalists providing the public with the pertinent information that the building they are writing about was designed by and architect.

Thank you!

Jerry

Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! NJ Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health, by Ballinger, wins an AIA NJ Honor Award in the built project category.

red_eagleNJ INSTITUTE FOR FOOD, NUTRITION + HEALTH
Ballinger NJ Institute for food nutrition and health
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health (IFNH) underscores the
commitment of Rutgers University to new transformational initiatives across the many disciplines impacting food, nutrition, and health. The IFNH draws upon the strengths of the entire university as it physically co-locates and strategically aligns diverse disciplines to address society’s pressing challenges in cardio-inflammatory disease, cancer and obesity.
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This interdisciplinary research building is the centerpiece of the Institute. The highly sustainable facility embodies the concepts of movement, activity, and wellness that are central to the Institute’s mission, while engaging local communities through its outreach focus to promote healthy lifestyles. The building features a student health clinic, a human performance lab, a nutrition research clinic, a healthy eating courtyard and a preschool dedicated to educating parents and children on diet and nutrition. The remaining spaces house wet and dry labs, faculty and administrative offices and outreach meeting spaces.
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The sloping site for IFNH is located at the edge of the agricultural campus’ academic core overlooking bucolic research fields and barns to the south. Situated on a main campus pathway between the academic core to the northwest and residential precinct to the southeast, the building is located to maximize its outreach mission. The immediate adjacency to the Campus’s Food Science Building enables direct collaboration between the University and Institute.
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The site presents a “building in the round” challenge demanding unique responses to each of it’s four orientations including a new campus amphitheater and quad, vehicular court, pre-school play yard and a sloping meadow. The Institute coalesces beneath an iconic shading “parasol” which organizes the formally articulated programmatic elements and expresses the Institute’s commitment to sustainability. The terra-cotta rain screen clad “bar” positioned on the north side of the granite faced piano-nobile, consolidates the more private and cellular room functions, terminates the axis of the new campus quad and responds to the brick campus context. The bar also serves as the backdrop to the south facing, naturally lit, open research environment with panoramic views of the campus. An abundance of openness and transparency unites all of these functions into a convergent environment to reinforce the collaborative mission of the Institute.
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Organizing this open environment is a centrally positioned “hearth” that is the symbolic and functional nutrition source for the building. It is clad in sustainably sourced wood, sponsors an iconic green wall and formally integrates all three floors of the Institute’s diverse program with an adjacent open stair.
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Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! Rowan University Holly Pointe Commons by Erdy McHenry Architecture, LLC wins an AIA NJ Merit Award in the residential category

 

red_eagleHOLLY POINTE COMMONS, ROWAN UNIVERSITY:  GLASSBORO, NJ

Erdy McHenry Rowan U

Holly Pointe Commons is located at the southeast corner of Rowan University’s main campus, bordered by Mullica Hill Road (route 322) and North Main Street. The building includes two interconnected wings joined by study bridges above the ground level. The building is organized along a gradual curve establishing a formal campus oval at the terminus to the existing pedestrian campus greenway. The outer edge of the oval creates a new campus gateway to visitors approaching the university from the east while enhancing student safety. The building is situated with a sensitivity toward the natural landscape and surrounded by a rain garden serving as a visual/physical buffer and an environmentally sensitive approach to water management. A new dining facility anchors the western end of the site, overlooking historic Abbott’s Pond.  Student housing, more than simply a place for students to eat and sleep, offers an opportunity to foster community and lifelong social impact. With that in mind, this 1,415 bed residential program is organized around smaller communities (pods) of 35 to 40 students in a college house experience, providing for the physical and social needs of students. Social and academic development is nurtured and supported throughout the living/learning community by an integrated series of lounges, recreation and laundry facilities encouraging interaction among residents.

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