Category Archives: Architecture in NJ

AIA Small Firm Exchange (SFx)

AIAeagle_2016The AIA Small Firm Exchange (SFx – and previously the Small Firm Roundtable SFRT) recently published its inaugural newsletter. Click here for a link to the letter from the Chair. There you will find the first articles and a link to sign up for the Small Firm Exchange (nationally), which will put you on the email list for the newsletter.

As mentioned in previous SFx posts, AIA New Jersey is also interested in organizing local Small Firm Exchanges (Roundtables) throughout the state. Please stay tuned for additional information, but if you have an interest, you can always contact me directly.

Thanks,

Bruce D. Turner, AIA
email: [email protected]

AIA South Jersey & AIA West Jersey Joint Meeting

AIA SJ&WJ Sept 13 2016 invitation

Position Available Architect – North Jersey / New York

WSA_Logo_email[5][11]WSA|ModernRuins
Irvington-on-Hudson NY
Paterson Fall NJ

Project Architect

WSA|ModernRuins is seeking highly motivated architects with 5-10 years experience in all stages of project development from conception through construction administration. Applicants must have a deep knowledge of construction assemblies, details and real world conditions for heritage buildings and new construction technologies.

A successful candidate will have the following qualities: positive proactive attitude; honesty and integrity; passionate and dedicated; motivated by a quest for knowledge and innovative solutions; ability to work independently and as a team; solid communication skills; productive use of time; and a commitment to excellence. Proficiency in AutoCad, Revit and other graphic software is required.

Responsibilities

Surveys and evaluation of existing buildings & sites Building, zoning and energy code analysis Conceptual drawings, programming & renderings Construction documents & specifications

Field and In-office construction administration

About our Firm

WSA|ModernRuins is an award-winning architectural firm dedicated to sustainable preservation. Deeply engaged in the formation and dissemination of innovations in technology, philosophy, codes and guidelines relating to the marriage of sustainability and heritage buildings. No matter the size or complexity, project goals integrate community and culture, education and training, regionalism and local economy, artisanship and authenticity.

Email cover letter, resume and references to [email protected]

AEC Cares at the 2016 AIA National Convention

In this month’s ARCHITECT Magazine, July 2016, pages 52-53 feature the AEC Cares project from the National Convention in Philadelphia. The project was a “blitz-build” renovation of the Philadelphia Athletic Recreation Center. As described on the AEC Cares website: “In 2016, AEC Cares partnered with the Community Design Collaborative to renovate the Philadelphia Athletic Recreation Center. Used by hundreds of children in the Sharswood neighborhood for after school and sports programs, the center was in desperate need of repair and upgrades.” As their sixth annual blitz build, project Philadelphia, as it was dubbed, took place on May 18th, 2016, the day before the 2016 AIA National Convention in Philadelphia. AIA WJ Emerging Professional, Jeffrey Brummer, AIA, was a member of the design team. Jeffrey is located on the far left side of the design team photograph on page 52 (and below).

Visit www.aeccares.com for more information. There are videos on the website highlighting the program.

Story submitted by Mark Barone, AIA, President-Elect of AIA West Jersey

AEC Cares at 2016 AIA Convention One Page

2017 AIANJ Awards Dinner – January 2017

AIA NEW JERSEY / AIA ARCHITECTS LEAGUE OF NORTHERN NJ INAUGURAL AND AWARDS GALA

AIANJ_ALNNJ

When: Saturday, January 14, 2017

 

Time: 6:00 PM to 11:00 PM

(Cocktails, Dinner, Dancing & Live Music)

 

Where: Sheraton Mahwah Hotel, 1 International Blvd. Mahwah, NJ 07495

 

  • Black tie optional affair celebrates the distinguished service of our past year’s presidents and their boards of trustees at our gala event.

 

  • Presentation of our Service Awards, which highlight the best of our organizations members. These awards include: Distinguished Service Award, Architect of the Year, as well as many others.

 

  • Attendance between 200-250 attendees. Many of whom are current or past leaders of our two organizations, not to mention several VIPs from AIA National.

 

INAUGURAL AND AWARDS GALA SPONSORSHIP PROSPECTUS – AIA 2017 Dinner Sponsorship Prospectus

SPONSOR TODAY!  Click Here

2016 Design Awards Open

2016 AIA-NJ Design CompetitionAIAeagle_2016

 

The AIA New Jersey Annual Design Awards Program brings public and professional recognition to architectural projects which exhibit design excellence. Architects are invited to submit their work for review by the distinguished Design Awards Jury.

 

IMPORTANT DATES  

 

October 1, 2016            Deadline to submit Design Awards entry form and fee.

 

October 18, 2016          Submit project boards to:

The Palace at Somerset Park

333 Davidson Avenue

Somerset, NJ 08873

 

October 19, 2016          Design Awards Jury convenes

 

October 20, 2016          Announcement of the Design Awards Winners at the Reception

 


For more information and to register Click Here

 

For More Information

Please call Laura Slomka at 609-393-5690 or email her at [email protected]

11th Annual AIAWJ Photography Competition

AIA West Jersey Hosts Annual Architectural Photography Competition

2016 – Call for Entries

AIA West Jersey Photography Competition

The 11th Annual AIA West Jersey Photography Competition has opened for entries.   Submit your interesting images of everything architectural – from the buildings around the corner, to a current project to a place you visited.

 

2015 Best Overall Awardee Bonn Apartments Robert Auld AIA

2015 Best Overall Awardee
Bonn Apartments
Robert Auld AIA

ELIGIBILITY: Competition is open to all AIA members and affiliates, students and the general public.

ENTRY DEADLINE:

September 7, 2016

CATEGORIES:

Color
Black & White

AWARDS:
Each year three cash prizes are awarded for Overall Best Entry, Best Color, and Best Black & White.  All entries are narrowed by a jury to select the top finalists, these finalists are put online for a public vote to selected the 3 prize winning photographs, the cover image of the calendar and 12 “monthly” images that will be printed in the 2017 AIA-WJ Calendar.

Best Overall Entry   – $ 250 prize
Best Color   – $ 150 prize
Best Black & White  – $ 150 prize

 

CONGRATULATIONS to the 2015 AWARDS:

Best Overall Entry –

2015 Best Color Portlandia Truman Benedetti

2015 Best Color
Portlandia
Truman Benedetti

Bonn Apartments
Robert Auld, AIA

2015 Best Color –
Portlandia
Truman Benedetti

2015 Best Black & White –
Paterson
Glenn Goldman, FAIA

THANK YOU to our 2015 jurors:

2015 Best Black & White Paterson Glenn Goldman, FAIA

2015 Best Black & White
Paterson
Glenn Goldman, FAIA

– Jason Lutz, AIA
– Ron Bertone, FAIA
– Michael Soriano, AIA

Additional Information about the competition or questions please contact :
Kimberly Bunn, AIA – Photography Competition Chair
856-234-7367   or    [email protected]

LEARN MORE:

Click here for Competition Information:2016_photo_info

Download Competition Entry Form here: 2016photo_entry

SURVEY – Business Models for Small Architectural Firms

AIAeagle_2016The Small Firm Exchange (SFx – previously called the Small Firm Roundtable, or SFRT) seeks the anonymous input of small architectural firms (10 persons or fewer) on a variety of business practices. Below is a full article by Kevin Harris, FAIA explaining the request. This article will soon appear in the CRAN Journal. But, to help us get a jump on this we are asking for you to participate in the survey now. The survey is very brief and should not take long to complete.

To access the survey click HERE!

Kevin Harris PhotoCRAN Journal – Summer 2016
Article by Kevin Harris, FAIA

ARCHITECTURAL MODELS FOR SMALL FIRMS

As architects, we are all familiar with the process and benefits of modeling our designs prior to construction. Models are an effective medium to study proposed creations and help communicate those concepts to our clients.

Constructing a model takes time however, it can give us an opportunity to take a break, reflect on new insights, and manipulate the parts until all seems right. Working with a model is a process that helps us elevate our plans from good to better.

As part of their ongoing effort on identifying what information could best benefit members of the AIA, the Small Firm Exchange (SFx) distributed its Small Firm Survey (Beta version) during the 2016 AIA Convention. Its purpose was to identify and measure the variety and commonalities existing in small firm models with the goal of providing meaningful insight to all architects practicing in small firms. It collected data on firm location; staff number, credentials, and commitment; project numbers, types, locations, and budgets; business plan existence and update frequency; contract usage; fee methods; gross revenue; and identified interest areas for additional studies.

The surveys were distributed as paper copies in both the SFx and AIA Fellow/VIP Lounges at the convention. Participants in this “Beta” test group formed a small sampling however, one large enough to reveal certain patterns of important concern to small firm practitioners.

Most notable is the fact that very few responded as having, or updating, a business plan. Those that did have one admitted at best to infrequent review or updating of this important planning tool. A business plan is widely acknowledged as a basic guide that is to be used throughout the lifetime of any business. In order to be of value, the plan must be kept up-to-date!

This brings up the rhetorical question that, as a profession, why don’t architects apply those concepts of creative process improvement modeling used to arrive at better designs, to plans used to guide their own businesses? Why indeed!

I am also guilty of spending little to no time on developing, studying, or “modeling” my own business plan. This SFx survey has piqued my interest on what other things I might learn from observing other practices. What patterns are applicable to my own firm? For example, since I want to improve my financial success, is there a correlation between firm income and the number of projects each year? Or does the number of staff in my outfit restrict the types and sizes of projects I can best handle? What type of contracts do others use? Are there better patterns to distribute the responsibility hats worn by a sole proprietor when in a firm of 2-4 people, or is it any better with 5-10? Is a larger firm more profitable than a sole practitioner without support staff? The data sampling of small firms must be greatly enlarged to properly study these and other relevant questions.

Below is a sample “dashboard” that visually communicates the data gathered from the initial “Beta” version. Similar outputs will be applied to the digital version, and will be made available to all who participate. Follow this link to the survey: http://tinyurl.com/AIASFxBusinessModelSurvey

SFx Beta Survey Results

Answering basic business questions and conducting mid-stream course corrections is required for your basic business survival. Having access to a database illustrating how your peers address these same issues will go a long way towards guiding you towards a more financially sustainable practice.

Download the survey link NOW! http://tinyurl.com/AIASFxBusinessModelSurvey

Updated small firm model statistics will follow in a future issue of the CRAN Journal.

CRAN Journal – Summer 2016
Article by Kevin Harris, FAIA

Gilded Age Architecture Featured in ASID Event

Join ASID for a Summer Networking Event

Gilded Age Architecture and Jazz in the Garden at Van Vleck House in Montclair.  Enjoy the tastings of Celebrity Chef Ariane Duarte, the music of Manouchebag, and connect with NJ’s finest design professionals, students and industry partners.

Ticket sales end on July 18. At the door price: $60

Thank you to our Sponsor:

Stark Carpet

WHEN       Tuesday, July 19, 2016 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
WHERE    Van Vleck House & Gardens – 21 Van Vleck Street, Montclair, NJ 07042
ASID2016_social

WORKING WITH THE MEDIA – “Bridging” your Message

AIA-NJBelow is the sixth in a series of “Working with the Media” articles. With your help, we hope to be able to leverage our strength in numbers to help promote architects, architecture and AIA-NJ. The other installments of the Working with the Media series can be found here.

Previously in Working with the Media, we focused on the basic elements of delivering your message in an interview. In a nutshell, this strategy recalled the principles of the “inverted pyramid,” by which the interviewee emphasizes the most salient points first, followed by supporting details and minutiae. This strategy helps to ensure that your most important insights are recognized as such by the reporter.

That said, a reporter will often begin working on a story with a specific “angle” in mind. Perhaps they’re looking for commentary on a new piece of legislation from an architectural perspective, or maybe they’re writing about a controversial development project. These interviews carry several professional sensitivities, making it important as ever to prepare a clearly mapped message. While it’s always ideal to cooperate with reporters as much as possible, there will be times when a reporter is seeking response to a question you’re unable to answer for legal or other reasons – or because you don’t have expertise on that specific topic.

If, in the course of an interview, you are asked such a question, you may want to “bridge” your answer – that is, gently transition the topic of conversation in your response. This is naturally preferable to a “no comment” response, since you may be able to offer some valuable information for the reporter without hitting on the topic’s specific sensitivities.

A few phrases that can help you bridge your conversation:

  • While I’m not at liberty to discuss specifics on that right now, I can tell you that…”
  • “I think what’s most relevant is…”
  • “I can’t speak for any of the involved parties, but it is generally true that…”

The goal in bridging your message is not to be evasive and avoidant, but to guide the conversation to a space where you can provide valuable commentary without overstepping any professional boundaries. In some cases, the journalist’s “probing” questions may actually have the simple goal of moving the conversation forward, and your relevant comments, which don’t necessarily answer the question directly, will give them the additional color they were seeking.

Ultimately, while bridging within an interview may feel somewhat unnatural at first, it’s preferable to providing a reporter with an on-the-record comment that could have negative legal (or other) ramifications.

If you would like to read the previous articles in this series, please see the following links:

Working with the Media Pays Off

Building Relationships

Writing a Letter to the Editor

Personal Engagement

Composing a Press Release

Composing a Boilerplate

Kyle Kirkpatrick
Account Supervisor
Beckerman PR Real Estate Team

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