Category Archives: Members & the Community

Latest news and information on the various ways AIA-NJ Members are involved in their New Jersey communities beyond designing the built environment.

CanStruction 2014 – Call for Entries

canstruction

16th Annual New Jersey Design/Build Competition

It starts with one can, to feed the hungry, to lift the spirit, to change the world. Can- struction is a charity committed to ending hunger, using “one can” as a catalyst for change. Every month, over 500,000 New Jerseyans access hunger reflief programs supported by the Community Food Bank of NJ. New Jersey’s design/build competition puts a visual spotlight on hunger while showcasing the state’s best and brightest designers.

Think you have what it takes to design and build a structure entirely out of canned food? Enter today! Get creative and help!

This year’s theme: “Trick-CAN-Treat: Creative Halloween designs”

WHO -

Teams of New Jersey Architects, Designers, Engineers, and Contractors

 

WHAT – Design and build structures made entirely from canned foods within a 10′ x 10′ x 8′H space

 

WHERE – Livingston Mall, Livingston, NJ

 

WHEN – September 10th   : Deadline for entry – 5:00 PM

October 24th: Build Day  – 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM

October 24:  Open to the Public

November 2nd:  Decanstruction (end of display)

Nov. 6th:  Awards Dinner – TBA

 

HOW – Download and Complete entry form.

Download Call for Entries

 

WHY – To benefit the Community Food Bank of New Jersey

Complete rules & regulations will be emailed upon receipt of entry form. Teams are responsible for acquiring canned food .

 

INFO – Contact Ronald Weston, AIA

CANstruction Chair

Contact Ronald Weston, AIA to request an entry form.
Email: rweston@westonarchitecture.com
Phone: 973.280.9614

Articles for Newsletter

red_eagleAs members of AIA-NJ membership, we would like to hear about your projects.  A member benefit many do not know about is publishing articles about NJ Architecture by NJ Architects.

Send any press releases regarding projects to AIA-NJ for it’s newsletter.  We can not guarantee that everything you submit will be published, however based on space and availability we will put any submissions in for review by the editorial team when the issues are being prepared.

Please submit via email to newsletter@aia-nj.org

In Memoriam – Hugh J. Connolly, AIA

Hugh Connolly, AIAHugh Connolly, 56, died at University Medical Center at Princeton on May 31, 2014, after a courageous one-year battle with metastatic melanoma. It was his, and wife Peggy’s, 34th wedding anniversary.

Known as a kind, patient, ethical and always loving person, he will be missed enormously by his family. He is survived by his wife and college sweetheart, Peggy; his daughters, Erin, and Hope (Daniel Gadala-Maria); his brother, Patrick (Laura); sister-in-law Nancy Hoffmann (Dom Wadhwa); mother-in-law Ann Hoffmann; nieces, Mindy Hoffmann (Mark Wang) and Jennifer Hoffmann; aunts, and cousins. He was predeceased by his parents, Kathryn Donahue Connolly and Hugh (Jack) Connolly; his father-in-law, William G. Hoffmann, his brother-in-law, James Farwell Hoffmann, uncles and cousins.

Born on March 25, 1958, in Glen Ridge, NJ, and raised in New Vernon, NJ, Hugh graduated near the top of his class at Morristown High School, where he earned awards in track and field, was active in Yearbook, Literacy Magazine, History Club, golf and bowling. He earned a five-year professional degree of bachelor of architecture at Cornell in 1981, graduating a semester early due to Advanced Placement credits. He met his future wife, Peggy, in their freshman dorm, Cornell University Hall Two, and married in 1980. He worked for major architecture firms in the Princeton area, including The Hillier Group, Nadaskey Kopelson, The Spiezle Group, and Clarke, Caton, Hintz. In 2009, he started his own firm, Connolly Architecture, LLC with an emphasis on environmentally sustainable design.

During his career, he designed the headquarters of Beneficial Finance in Morristown, NJ; Shannondell Senior Living in Valley Forge, PA; a Frank Lloyd Wright prairie style house in Lambertville, NJ; Katmandu, a former ironworks in Trenton to become a nightclub, and a home for a family with chemical sensitivities; he redesigned the Lambertville House Hotel as well as designed an addition to his family’s house. Valuing its character, he and Peggy restored many aspects of their American Four Square home.  He was one of the first in the area to earn the LEED designation from the United States Green Building Council. He received the 1997 Downtown New Jersey Awards for the design of the Mercer County Civil Courthouse, Lambertville House, and Katmandu Night Club and the 2001 Downtown New Jersey Award for One Bergen Plaza.

He and Peggy settled in 1981 in Hopewell, where they raised their two daughters. He was active in many community organizations, including: Hopewell Harvest Fair (board member, contest chair, business exhibitor, and developer of ‘Green Lane’), Hopewell Borough Train Station Committee (to save the train station), the first Hopewell Gazebo Park Playground Committee, Hopewell Valley Green Team, and the Hopewell Borough Planning Board. Always a proponent of his daughters’ educational and recreational activities, he coached Hope’s softball team, developed an architectural scavenger hunt and helped with cookie sales (Girl Scouts), and fought the educational establishment to obtain the education his daughters needed. He always made time to be a part of his daughters’ activities to support them.

He was also a member of the American Institute of Architects, the Souvenir Building Collectors Society, Mensa, BNI Tigers Networking of Princeton, and the Princeton Chamber of Commerce. Hugh loved to travel, particularly to see outstanding architecture and visit historical sites, to walk through Hopewell, to collect souvenir buildings, to read sci-fi books, to play board games with his family, to watch historical and sci-fi movies, to test new games at Mensa’s annual Mind Games and to attend Mensa Princeton Tuesday lunches.

Viewing was held Saturday, June 7, at Hopewell Presbyterian Church, followed by a church service, with burial afterwards at Highland Cemetery, Hopewell.  In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Melanoma Research Foundation, Sierra Club, or  Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University.   Arrangements were by Wilson-Apple Funeral Home, 2560 Pennington Road, Pennington, NJ.  Contact his family at njreaders@aol.com or 609-466-1898.

 

AIA-NJ

A Note From AIA-NJ:

 

AIA New Jersey is very saddened by this loss to our architecture community in New Jersey.   In keeping with our policy of promoting architecture and mentoring our future professionals, AIA New Jersey will be making a donation in Hugh
’s name to the AIA New Jersey Scholarship Foundation.

 

If you would also like to make a donation in his name to the Scholarship Foundation, please send donations to:
AIA New Jersey Scholarship Foundation
c/o Jeanne Perantoni, AlA
1011 US Highway 22, Suite 203
Bridgewater, NJ  08807

 

In Memoriam – Robert Harding Lee, AIA

Mayflower Descendent

Robert Harding Lee, 89, of Devon; Chester County, PA passed away on Wednesday morning, July 16, 2014 in his home.
He was born on May 10, 1925 in Essex, CT, the only child of Clarence and Hazel Harding Lee.
A Veteran of the United States Army, he served during World War II, and was honorably discharged a recipient of the Good Conduct Medal, Asiatic Pacific Theater Campaign Ribbon, WW II Victory Medal, Philippine Liberation Ribbon with Bronze Service Stars, Distinguished Unit Badge, and The Bronze Medal.
Mr. Lee graduated from the University of Michigan and retired from Crabtree and Lee in CT and the State of New Jersey where he was an Architect. He also served as President for the New Jersey Chapter of the American Institute of Architecture.
An avid traveler, he traveled worldwide seeing and studying architectural design.
His wife of 62 years, Mary Jane McWhorter Lee, whom he met on a blind date while they both attended the University of Michigan, and married on June 28, 1952, survives.
Surviving in addition to his wife are his children Robert H. Lee, Jr. and wife Norma of Tallahassee, FL, Susan Guenzer and husband Philip of Malvern, PA, Virginia Katherine Pearo, wife of the late John, of Phoenixville, PA, Cathleen Elizabeth Garrett and husband Jeff of Pottstown, PA, Mark McWhorter and longtime companion Robin Basile of Burgetsttown, and James E. McWhorter, III and wife Yasmin Abadian of Potomac, MD; seven grandchildren and seven great grandchildren.
Friends were received on Sunday, July 20, 2014, in the Lee & Martin Funeral Home, Burgettstown. Interment  followed in the Cross Creek Cemetery.
If so desired, memorial donations may be made in his memory to the Burgettstown Area Senior Citizens Association, 200 Senior Way, Burgetsttown, PA 15021.

AIA-NJA Note From AIA-NJ:
AIA New Jersey is very saddened by this loss to our architecture community in New Jersey. In keeping with our policy of promoting architecture and mentoring our future professionals, AIA New Jersey will be making a donation in Robert’s name to the AIA New Jersey Scholarship Foundation.

If you would also like to make a donation in his name to the Scholarship Foundation, please send donations to:
AIA New Jersey Scholarship Foundation
c/o Jeanne Perantoni, AlA
1011 US Highway 22, Suite 203
Bridgewater, NJ 08807

Salvation Army Ray & Joan Kroc Corps Community Center Receives 2014 Smart Growth Award

The Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center in Camden, New Jersey was recently honored by New Jersey Future with a 2014 Smart Growth Award at the organization’s annual celebration held on June 5, 2014 at the Newark Club’s Metropolitan Room in Newark, New Jersey.

 

Kroc-TownPlaza-Rendering-635x265Designed by Kitchen & Associates of Collingswood, New Jersey, the project aims to provide the Camden community with a state-of-the-art facility, offering local residents a variety of community-oriented services, including recreational, social, religious and cultural amenities within its program. The center is expected to open in October 2014.

 

 Upon its completion, the center will open its doors to a city that is perhaps best known for its struggles with violent crime and urban decay. Approximately 45% of families in Camden live below the poverty line, and the unemployment rate as of August 2013 was 16.6%, nearly double the national average. Some of the problems of concentrated  neighborhood poverty often include high unemployment rates, rampant crime, health disparities, inadequate early care and education, struggling schools, and disinvestment. Often spanning generations, poverty such as Camden’s can be a difficult, if not impossible hurdle to overcome. But the creation of safe gathering places within the residential fabric for learning, exercising, worship, and community-building, can provide ‘a beacon of hope and an agent of change,’ reflecting both the heart and the spirit of the Kroc mission statement.

 

In January 2004, The Salvation Army USA announced that it would be receiving nearly $1.6 billion from the estate of Mrs. Joan Kroc, (whose husband founded McDonald’s), to establish community centers similar to the one Mrs. Kroc established in San Diego. Following a competitive, nationwide proposal process, The Salvation Army regional office in the City of Camden received $59 million of funding. By forging new relationships in the community and partnering with corporate sponsors and political leaders, the Salvation Army was able to secure the additional $31 million to fully fund the project.

 

kroc2Camden officials and The Salvation Army representatives chose to locate the community center on a portion of the former Harrison Avenue Landfill site. The 100-acre landfill was owned and operated by the City of Camden from 1952 to 1971. The landfill is now closed, and the land is owned by the Camden Redevelopment Authority (CRA). It is located on the northwest corner of Harrison Avenue and East State Street in the Cramer Hill neighborhood within the Cramer Hill Brownfield Development Area. The selection of this site for the Kroc center made by local stakeholders, city officials and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) was seen as an ideal opportunity to expedite the redevelopment of brownfield sites that border a 2-mile stretch of the Delaware River.

 

The reclamation of the 24-acre portion of the landfill for the Kroc Center was realized after several phases of remediation. In September 2008, the NJDEP completed an initial $4.1 million publicly-funded cleanup phase which removed approximately 14,000 tons of industrial waste material. Subsequently 221,000 cubic yards of clean infill soil (from a previous Delaware River channel dredging project) was brought to the site from the Palmyra Nature Cove. It was stockpiled on the site, ready to be located under the building’s foundations and to cap the landscaped areas. From December 2011 until February 2013, the remediation work was accomplished and the Palmyra material was relocated once more into its final location. Since then, most of the activity at the site has been construction-related; the remaining site work – surface landscaping and final top cover – will be completed before the Kroc Center opens October 2014.

 

The Center itself will be 120,000 square feet, nearly 3 football fields in length, and provide recreational, health, educational, cultural, family and spiritual programming for area residents. It will also serve as the hub for Salvation Army services in the Tri-County region. The amenity-laden facility includes both indoor and outdoor recreational spaces. Outdoor facilities include basketball courts, a regulation little league baseball field with lighting for night games, a softball field, and a soccer/lacrosse/field hockey pitch, meandering walking paths, a playground, and a concessions building with restrooms. There is onsite parking for 250 cars as well as bus parking. 

 

The indoor program is divided to three areas serving the Mind, Body and Spirit. The Fitness space includes an 11,000 SF gymnasium with spectator seating, an aquatic center with 8-lane competition pool and an indoor water park, an exercise center with dance studios, a thirty-foot rock climbing wall, and comprehensive locker room spaces with showers and dressing rooms.  There are social gathering spaces for teens and youths, a senior center, drop-in babysitting, a 200-seat performing arts theater, and a 250-seat chapel. Available social services will include a family life and personal development center, classrooms, art room, computer lab, music room, library learning center, a commercial kitchen, an early childhood education center serving 90 preschool children, and a health clinic run by Cooper Hospital. All of these separate spaces connect via an 8,000 SF indoor ‘Town Plaza’ gathering space and café, situated beneath a spectacular glass skylight.

 

For more information regarding this exciting project in Camden, please visit the Kitchen & Associates News Page.http://www.kitchenandassociates.com/category/news/

 

Spiezle Architectural Group Receives Honor From NJASBO For Service to NJ School Districts

Spiezle Architectural Group, Inc. recently received an honorable mention from the New Jersey Association of School Business Officials (NJASBO) for the organization’s 2014 Above & Beyond Award. NJASBO gives this annual award to companies who have gone “above and beyond” in assisting school districts with whom they work. Spiezle received the honorable mention for working with school districts throughout the state to help them provide nurturing, economical, and efficient environments for students.

Speizle was nominated by Dennis DeMarino, Woodbridge Township School District School Business Administrator/Board Secretary, for “epitomizing what quality of service means. Public school districts operate with limited resources; having a firm like Spiezle that can help identify and problem-solve in constructive ways without always requiring compensation – which is unheard of – is much appreciated.”N

The NJASBO Associate Business Members Executive Committee congratulate Steven G. Siegel of Spiezle Architectural Group (center) as he accepts the association’s Above & Beyond Award.  From left are President Nancy Riccio, G.R. Murray/O’Gorman & Young, Inc.; Secretary Alan Walker, Atlantic Tomorrows Office; Latonya Jackson, G.R. Murray/O’Gorman & Young, Inc.; Immediate Past President Bill Pappalardo, GREYHAWK Construction Managers & Consultants; and Vice President Christine Messina, All Risk, Inc.

The NJASBO Associate Business Members Executive Committee congratulate Steven G. Siegel of Spiezle Architectural Group (center) as he accepts the association’s Above & Beyond Award.  From left are President Nancy Riccio, G.R. Murray/O’Gorman & Young, Inc.; Secretary Alan Walker, Atlantic Tomorrows Office; Latonya Jackson, G.R. Murray/O’Gorman & Young, Inc.; Immediate Past President Bill Pappalardo, GREYHAWK Construction Managers & Consultants; and Vice President Christine Messina, All Risk, Inc.

DeMarino especially recognized Steven Siegel, AIA, LEEDap. Siegel, a senior associate and project manager at Spiezle, routinely gives presentations to school boards, and attends committee meetings, to answer procedural and technical questions, even when his firm is not involved in a project.

Spiezle constructs and renovates many types of buildings, but according to its website, the firm is focused on school environments. “Our children are our future. Providing the best environment in which they can grow and prosper is our ultimate goal. Our environments nurture our children and inspire their educators by creating opportunities to connect their energy and create fresh new ideas. The schools we design are economical, efficient, sustainable, flexible, innovative, and inspiring, and we are proud of our legacy in public and private schools.”

Speizle is headquartered in Trenton, but also has offices in Media, PA, Greenville, SC, Baltimore, MD and New York, NY.

Regional Architecture Groups Look At Critical Infrastructure in a Post-Sandy World

Reprint of article published on July 11, 2014, on NJBiz

Chapters of the American Institute of Architects from New Jersey, New York, Connecticut and Rhode Island held a “regional recovery working group” Friday on the campus of Fairleigh Dickinson University in Madison, focusing on changes to critical infrastructure design in a post-Hurricane Sandy world.

The event was the third in a series of Sandy-related workshops. Others have looked at Sandy’s effects on cities and coastal communities.

Speakers from both the public and private sectors weighed in Friday, touching on issues concerning resiliency, design, building codes and the coordination on the parts of regional governing bodies.

“Forums like this are pretty awesome because it’s the idea exchange that happens,” said John Boulé, a vice president of global planning firm Parsons Brinckerhoff. “Brain cells start to knock against each other … and hopefully it will spur you to some action.”

Boulé discussed protecting transportation assets and rethinking planning strategies, namely by incorporating cost-benefit analysis into the framework.

“You have to come up with different ways of thinking about risk,” Boulé said.

Scott Davis, senior advisor in the office of the secretary at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, said that at the federal level, making progress after Sandy is the goal, but it’s difficult to put broad timetables on projects.

“I think we’re all looking to move forward as quickly as possible and some projects might be more complicated than others,” Davis said.

Davis added that he feels a focus point in the future for architecture groups and others in the industry will be turning resiliency into a household word, much like sustainability is today.

Read Full Article…

AIA-NJ

Sustainable Jersey Looking for Participants

Sustainable Jersey has contacted AIA-NJ to see if there would be interest in filling some openings on their Task Force.  Here is some information about the program.

Sustainable Jersey is supported by 24 issue-based Task Forces (TFs) that help maintain the integrity and substance of the certification program.  Over 300 leaders in New Jersey volunteer to serve on the Sustainable Jersey Task Forces from academia, the non-profit sector, the business community, and state, local, federal, and county government.  The Task Forces research and disseminate best practices, translate global and state imperatives into local actions, test sustainability planning models and develop community resources for the program.

For More Information on Sustainable Jersey Task Forces:  http://www.sustainablejersey.com/about/task-forces/

Specifically to Green Design:

•             Typically the Green Design TF meet about 2 times a year. These meetings can be scheduled when/ where/ how it is most convenient for the members to meet. They typically are about 2 hours long.

•             The expected products from a TF are “Actions” that are then Incorporated into the Sustainable Jersey Certification Program. All actions are listed here: http://www.sustainablejersey.com/actions-certification/actions/.

 

List of Current Green Design Actions:

Green Building Policy/Resolution – 5 Points

Green Building Training – 5 Points

Green Building Education – 5 Points

Commercial and Residential Buildings

  • Create a Green Development Checklist – 10 Points
  • Site Plan Green Design Standards – 20 Points

Green Design Municipal Buildings

  • New Construction  – 20 Points
  • Existing Buildings – Construction Waste Recycling  – 10 Points
  • Existing Buildings – Upgrade/Retrofit-Light Pollution  – 10 Points
  • Existing Buildings – Upgrade/Retrofit-Water Conservation  – 10 Points

 

•             After actions are added into the program, TF’s are then charged with developing training and outreach to provide support to municipalities that are looking to receive points for that action. Participants take feedback from municipalities on proposed actions and then revise the actions accordingly on annual cycle.

 

If anyone is interested in being a part of the Sustainable Jersey Green Design Task Force please contact:

Athena Sarafides, LEED AP

Sustainability and Green Energy

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

Tel: (609) 777-4211

Fax: (609) 292-1921

athena.sarafides@dep.nj.gov

www.nj.gov/dep/sage

 

Architecture for Humanity REDC

REDC

Resilience Through Education & Design Center

July 18-20 at the Seaside Heights Community Center,
1000 Bay Blvd., Seaside Heights, NJ 08751.  

Questions and comments

Contact person is: Gail Gambarini, Regional Project Coordinator, 917-751-3788,
gailgambarini@architectureforhumanity.org 

REDC_Flyer

SENATE PASSES MAJOR AIA-NJ LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVE

SENATE PASSES MAJOR AIA-NJ LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVE

Bill now moves to Governor Christie’s desk

Last night, the New Jersey State Senate unanimously passed A2025, a AIA-NJ-supported bill that grants immunity from liability for certain professional services rendered during emergencies under certain circumstances.

The bill was also unanimously passed by the Assembly in May, with the support of sponsors Assemblymen Lou Greenwald, Paul Moriarty, and Upendra Chivukula.

The bill now moves to Gov. Chris Christie’s desk for his signature. This is an important bill that AIA-NJ has been in support of for years. Please call or write to Gov. Christie to let him know how important this is for us:

 
Office of the Governor 
PO Box 001
Trenton, NJ 08625

609-292-6000

To send a message to the Governor online, follow

this link and select from the topic list, ‘Law & Public Safety’.

AIA-NJ

 

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