Author Archives: skliesch

Historic Building Architects, LLC receives New Jersey State Historic Preservation Office Award for BAYADA

 

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Annabelle Radcliffe-Trenner, Principal,
Historic Building Architects LLC
312 West State Street,
Trenton, NJ 08618

Tel 609-393-3999
Fax 609-393-4333
www.hba-llc.com

 

Historic Overview:

 

This is an excellent example of a Greek Revival Italianate wood frame house built in 1858 by John Buzby. The house is located in the heart of the Moorestown Historic District at the intersection of Main Street and Mill Street. The property remained in the Buzby family until 1920.  Since then, it has transitioned to commercial use and was used as a hotel, beauty shop, and real estate office. In 2015, Mark Baiada, founder of BAYADA Home Health Care purchased the property with the intention of restoring it to its original grandeur for the corporate headquarters of his company.  Historic Building Architects, LLC were selected as the Preservation Architects to assist with the design and restoration of the house.  Extensive research was completed reviewing pattern books and architectural details and finishes used for the period.

 

Scope of Work:

 

This is truly a rehabilitation project.  It acknowledges the need to alter and add to the historic property to meet the continuing and changing uses while retaining the property’s historic character.  Although this project was for commercial office use, the owner wanted the architect to meticulously restore and preserve the interior architectural features of the building.  This included the wood floors that were salvaged and reused on the second floor, the wood inlaid details on the first floor, the plaster moldings and cornices, the stair details, including the decorative balustrades, the large wood paneled doors, the wood windows with their inlaid panels below, and the fireplace mantels were all meticulously preserved by skilled, largely local craftsmen.  In addition, the building needed some improvements to allow for public use as an office and to meet building code requirements.  One of the primary features of the rehabilitation is the creation of a new staircase to the third floor.  The new octagonal oculus on the third floor allows light from the cupola above to pour down through the building. This was indeed a detail used in the Italianate revival period although in this instance no historic evidence of an oculus was found, however, it was in keeping with the character of the building style.  Other features included arched openings with decorative Victorian style brackets, new barrier-free restrooms designed in a manner appropriate and finished with Victorian finishes.  New systems and upgrades were also included in the renovation.  Lighting was both practical as well as decorative with electric fixtures in keeping with the Victorian period gas lights.  Great detail and care was taken to use classical Victorian finishes, such as William Morris wallpapers and traditional Victorian tile imported from England to complete the restoration.  In addition, the interior design was meticulously finished to include furniture and details that might have been found in a Victorian house of this period.  This extraordinary care and attention to detail was motivated by the client’s desire to retain the house to its Victorian period of significance.  This has successfully created a very pleasing, warm, and welcoming historic space, and yet at the same time, this building functions as the office headquarters for BAYADA Home Health Care services, an organization with 18,000 staff, 300 offices, in 22 States.

 

Award Nomination:

 

It is a rare experience for a Preservation Architect, to work with a commercial company with a passion for preserving a historic building.  BAYADA Home Health Care services could have created their new headquarters within a commercial modern building, or built a new building.  However, they had the vision and foresight and passion for preservation to select a historic building within the heart of their historic community and to repurpose and revitalize the building for both their benefit and the community benefit.  They have set the highest of standards for raising awareness in preservation for commercial use and demonstrated that a historic building can work equally well for modern office needs.  This vision is in keeping with the values of BAYADA Home Health Care, which are compassion, excellence, and reliability.  They build relationships and they recognize that creating a “home” within a historic house is in keeping with their work as home care providers.  Moreover, they wanted to make sure that the local community was involved both in terms of supporting the local craftsmen, as well as recognizing the important urban revitalization value of relocating to Main Street and having a welcome presence in the heart of the commercial and historic district of Moorestown.

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Preservation Award Certificate List 2017

BAYADA Home Health Care – Owner

PROFESSIONAL TEAM

Historic Building Architects LLC – Architects of Record

KSI Professional Engineers, LLC Engineers

Neil Johnson Architect Architect for Construction Administration

R. Craig Lord Construction General Contractor

Jodi Swanholm Interior Design, LLC Interior Designer

CRAFTSMEN

Painting/Wallpaper: Ahern Painting, Inc. Owner: John Ahern Tel: 856-665-1131

Plasterer: James R. Slim Plastering, Inc. Owner: James R. Slim Tel: 856-235-6246

Wood Stair: Harmony Stairs, LLC. Owner: William Torres Tel: 856-336-2336

Window Restoration: WMG Historic Restoration, LLC. Owner: Michael J. Gallant Tel: 856-397-2781

Wood Flooring: Dan Higgins Wood Flooring Owner: Michael Higgins Tel: 609-953-7766

Interior Door Restoration: David Ramsay Cabinetmakers, Inc. President: David Ramsay III Tel: 856-234-7776

EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW: NJ State Historic Preservation Awards TONIGHT!

062016#14Local Project Receives Prestigious Historic Preservation Award

The Millington Schoolhouse/Old Town Hall in Long Hill Township, NJ will be presented a 2017 New Jersey Historic Preservation Award on May 11, 2017.  The coveted award will be presented at a ceremony at the Burlington County Olde Courthouse to six preservation projects from across New Jersey.

“These awards are our chance to honor the many private individuals, organizations and corporations; and state, county and local governments who work hard to preserve New Jersey’s historic places,” said Katherine Marcopul, Administrator and Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer.  “It is inspiring to see citizens taking action to preserve New Jersey’s historic resources!”

The Millington Schoolhouse/Old Town Hall landmark building has served the community since its initial construction over 200 years ago.  Adapting to local needs and growth, the structure grew with several additions to become a library, and then the town hall.  It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

This award-winning rehabilitation of the structure is guided by a preservation plan developed by Clarke Caton Hintz, with AIA NJ Past President, Michael Hanrahan, AIA, as project manager and includes retention of the original school room, which will serve as open community meeting space and an exhibition gallery.

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The annual NJ Historic Preservation Awards honor projects, groups or persons, dedicated to preserving New Jersey’s history.  This year marks the 27th anniversary of the awards celebrating May as National Preservation Month.  The Awards are presented by the NJ State Historic Preservation Office in the Department of Environmental Protection, and the NJ Historic Sites Council.

For more information about the NJ Historic Preservation Awards Program, contact Kat Cannelongo at (609) 984-0543.

Effective May 1, 2017: N.J.A.C. Rule Adoption allowing Digital Signing and Sealing of Documents

NEW JERSEY REGISTER

Copyright © 2017 by the New Jersey Office of Administrative Law

VOLUME 49, ISSUE 9

ISSUE DATE: MAY 1, 2017

RULE ADOPTIONS

LAW AND PUBLIC SAFETY

DIVISION OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS

STATE BOARD OF ARCHITECTS

49 N.J.R. 1093(a)

Adopted Amendments: N.J.A.C. 13:27-3.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 8.9

Adopted New Rules: N.J.A.C. 13:27-6.5 and 8.10

Digital Signing and Sealing of Documents

Proposed: October 3, 2016, at 48 N.J.R. 2028(a).

Adopted: February 24, 2017, by the New Jersey State Board of Architects, Obiora C. Agudosi, RA, President.

Filed: March 29, 2017, as R.2017 d.079, with non-substantial changes not requiring additional public notice and comment (see N.J.A.C. 1:30-6.3).

Authority: N.J.S.A. 45:3-3 and 45:3A-13.

Effective Date: May 1, 2017.

Expiration Date: February 7, 2018.

Summary of Public Comments and Agency Responses follows:

The official comment period ended December 2, 2016. The Board received one comment on the notice of proposal from Marc Pfeiffer, Assistant Director, Bloustein Local Government Research Center, Rutgers University. In order to ensure compliance with the Administrative Procedures Act and the rules promulgated by the Office of Administrative Law, the comment period was reopened and extended from December 19, 2016, to January 17, 2017. The Board received no additional comments during the extension.

1. Mr. Pfeiffer applauds the Board’s proposal, noting his support for the Board’s move to accept digital seals and signatures. However, he expresses concern that the link in proposed new N.J.A.C. 13:27-6.5(a)1 and 8.10(a)1 to the standards developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is to a third-party web address and not to an address maintained by NIST. He recommends that the link be changed to a web address managed by NIST.

RESPONSE: The Board thanks Mr. Pfeiffer for his comments and understands his concern over the link. Third-party addresses can be altered or become defunct. The Board is changing N.J.A.C. 13:27-6.5(a)1 and 8.10(a)1 and changing the link so it goes to the document hosted directly on the NIST website.

Summary of Agency-Initiated Changes: The State Board of Architects is changing N.J.A.C. 13:27-6.5 and 8.10 on adoption to correct an error in the year listed as the publication date of the FIPS PUB 186-4 document. As proposed, it says the publication was released in 2014. The publication was actually released in 2013.

Federal Standards Statement

A Federal standards analysis is not required because the adopted amendments and new rules are subject to State statutory requirements and are not subject to any Federal requirements or standards.

Full text of the adoption follows (additions to proposal indicated in boldface with asterisks *thus*; deletions from proposal indicated in brackets with asterisks *[thus]*):

SUBCHAPTER 3. ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE AND RESPONSIBILITY

13:27-3.1 Definitions

The following words and terms, when used in this chapter, shall have the following meanings unless the context clearly indicates otherwise:

. . .

“Electronic transmission” means the transmission of electronic data files from one electronic device to another. The term includes manual delivery of electronic data storage media from one person or entity to another.

. . .

“Seal” means a digital or impression type seal meeting the requirements of N.J.A.C. 13:27-6.5 and 8.10 and affixed to a document by a licensee.

“Signature” means a digital or handwritten signature of a licensee affixed to a document in accordance with N.J.A.C. 13:27-6.5 and 8.10.

SUBCHAPTER 6. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR A TITLE BLOCK

13:27-6.2 Title block contents; requirements by form of architectural practice

(a) When the architect practices as an individual or sole proprietor the title block shall contain:

1.-4. (No change.)

5. The name, license number, and space for the signature of the architect in responsible charge, and the date when signed.

(b) When a partnership or limited liability partnership of two or more licensed architects or closely allied professionals, in which at least one partner is an architect, practice architecture, the title block shall contain:

1.-4. (No change.)

5. The name, license number, and space for the signature of the architect in responsible charge, and the date when signed.

(c) When professionals practice architecture as a professional service corporation organized under N.J.S.A. 14A:17-1 et seq., the title block shall contain:

1.-4. (No change.)

5. The name, license number, and space for the signature of the architect in responsible charge, and the date when signed.

(d) Title block contents for a general business corporation or limited liability company authorized to practice architecture under a Certificate of Authorization issued pursuant to N.J.A.C. 13:27-4.8 shall contain:

1.-4. (No change.)

5. The full name, license number, and space for the signature of the architect in responsible charge, and the date when signed.

(e)-(h) (No change.)

13:27-6.3 Signing and sealing construction documents

(a)-(b) (No change.)

(c) Construction documents and the title pages of the specifications for filing with a public agency or for the owner’s legal documentation requirements may be digitally signed and sealed if the digital signature and seal meet the requirements of N.J.A.C. 13:27-6.5. An architect using a seal press shall seal construction documents only with seal presses purchased or exchanged through the Board. 1

3:27-6.5 Digital signatures and seals

(a) A digital signature and seal shall possess the same weight, authority, and effect as handwritten signature and pressure seal when the following criteria are met:

1. The digital signing and sealing process satisfies the requirements of the Digital Signature Standard (DSS) established by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, FIPS PUB 186-4 *[(2014)]* *(2013)*, which is incorporated herein by reference, as amended and supplemented. This standard may be obtained at: *[http://cryptome.org/2013/07/NIST.FIPS.186-4.pdf]* *http://nvlpubs.nist.gov/nistpubs/FIPS/NIST.FIPS.186-4.pdf*. The digital signature and seal must be:

i. Unique to the licensee;

ii. Verifiable by a trusted third party or some other approved process as belonging to the licensee;

iii. Under the licensee’s direct and exclusive control; and

iv. Linked to a document in such a manner that the digital signature and seal is invalidated if any data in the document is changed. Once the digital signature and seal are applied to the document, the document shall be available in read-only format if the document is to be digitally transmitted.

(b) A licensee who digitally signs and seals a document shall maintain a digital copy of the electronically transmitted document that has also been digitally signed and sealed for future verification purposes.

(c) The pictorial representation of the digital signature and seal shall be readily available to the Board upon request and shall be produced in a [page=1094] manner acceptable to the Board. It shall contain the same words and shall have substantially the same graphic appearance and size as when the image of the digitally transmitted document is viewed at the same size as the document in its original form.

(d) Licensees are responsible for the use of their private digital keys. A lost or compromised key shall not be used and the licensee shall cause a new key pair to be generated in accordance with the criteria set forth in (a) above. A licensee shall take all reasonable steps to ensure that a compromised key is invalidated, and shall inform all affected clients that the digital key has been compromised.

SUBCHAPTER 8. LICENSED LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

13:27-8.9 Seal and signature

(a)-(d) (No change.)

(e) Construction documents and the title pages of the specifications for filing with a public agency or for the owner’s legal documentation requirements may be digitally signed and sealed if the digital signature and seal meet the requirements of N.J.A.C. 13:27-8.10.

13:27-8.10 Digital signatures and seals

(a) A digital signature and seal shall possess the same weight, authority, and effect as handwritten signature and pressure seal when the following criteria are met:

1. The digital signing and sealing process satisfies the requirements of the Digital Signature Standard (DSS) established by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, FIPS PUB 186-4 *[(2014)]* *(2013)*, which is incorporated herein by reference, as amended and supplemented. This standard may be obtained at: *[http://cryptome.org/2013/07/NIST.FIPS.186-4.pdf]* *http://nvlpubs.nist.gov/nistpubs/FIPS/NIST.FIPS.186-4.pdf*. The digital signature and seal must be:

i. Unique to the licensee;

ii. Verifiable by a trusted third party or some other approved process as belonging to the licensee;

iii. Under the licensee’s direct and exclusive control; and

iv. Linked to a document in such a manner that the digital signature and seal is invalidated if any data in the document is changed. Once the digital signature and seal are applied to the document, the document shall be available in read-only format if the document is to be digitally transmitted.

(b) A licensee who digitally signs and seals a document shall maintain a digital copy of the electronically transmitted document that has also been digitally signed and sealed for future verification purposes.

(c) The pictorial representation of the digital signature and seal shall be readily available to the Board upon request and shall be produced in a manner acceptable to the Board. It shall contain the same words and shall have substantially the same graphic appearance and size as when the image of the digitally transmitted document is viewed at the same size as the document in its original form.

(d) Licensees are responsible for the use of their private digital keys. A lost or compromised key shall not be used and the licensee shall cause a new key pair to be generated in accordance with the criteria set forth in (a) above. A licensee shall take all reasonable steps to ensure that a compromised key is invalidated, and shall inform all affected clients that the digital key has been compromised.

END

Bergen County is Celebrating National Historic Preservation Month and you are invited!

award-announce-02228_001In celebration of May 2017 National Historic Preservation Month, Bergen County will hold the 2017 Historic Preservation Commendation Awards on Thursday, May 4th at 7:00 p.m. at the historic St. Paul’s Episcopal Church located at 113 Engle Street, Englewood, NJ.
The 2017 Awards will be presented by Bergen County Executive James J. Tedesco III, Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders, the Historic Preservation Advisory Board and the Division of Cultural and Historic Affairs. A reception will follow the ceremony.
The public is invited to the program and reception. All are welcome.
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Advisory Board Member William J. Martin, AIA will Emcee the event on behalf of the Historic Preservation Advisory Board. The 12 member board is well stocked with AIA members, volunteering their time and expertise to promote and protect the culture and history of Bergen County. Bill is joined by Board Chairman Bruce A. Barton, AIA, Matthew Wolchko, AIA and John Cohen, AIA.
 
The Bergen County Historic Preservation Advisory Board serves as a resource to the Division of Cultural and Historic Affairs and to the County Executive and the Freeholders on historic preservation policy, interpretive programs, operation of county historic sites and facilities, preparation of a County Preservation Master Plan, and on acquisition and preservation of properties as county-owned historic sites. The board reviews applications and recommends funding for the Historic Preservation Trust Fund component of the BC Open Space Trust Fund, sponsors the annual County Historic Preservation Awards, reviews construction and development applications from the public and private sectors that may impact historic sites, sponsors educational seminars pertaining to preservation subjects, and, when requested, provides technical assistance on historic preservation to municipalities and private individuals. 

AIA South Jersey Member, Catherine Lorentz, AIA is featured in the news

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The Press of Atlantic City has featured Catherine’s home restoration project in their April Home and Garden section. Congratulations, Catherine, from your colleagues at AIA NJ. AC PRESS-1 copyAC PRESS-2

Jerome Leslie Eben, FAIA, Elevated to American Institute of Architects College of Fellows

 

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Jerome Leslie Eben, AIA

New Jersey Architect Recognized with National Distinction

On Thursday April 27, 2017, the New Jersey chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA-NJ) will celebrate the elevation of Jerome Leslie Eben, FAIA, a beloved member, mentor and leader, to the American Institute of Architects’ (AIA) prestigious College of Fellows.

 

The fellowship program was developed to honor those architects who have made a significant contribution to architecture and society, and who have achieved a standard of excellence in the profession. The program recognizes architects in several categories, including outstanding service to the profession, service to the community, design, architectural education and career or volunteer excellence beyond the built environment. Election to fellowship not only recognizes the achievements of architects as individuals, but also their significant contribution to the profession and to society at a national level. The 2017 fellows will be honored at an investiture ceremony at the National AIA Conference on Architecture 2017 in Orlando FL.

 

Upon receiving word of his elevation, Eben stated “I have been incredibly fortunate to have had the opportunity to serve the public in a career that has included the completion of buildings for all types of construction and uses, across the entire country, while at the same time supporting my colleagues through volunteer efforts with the AIA.  I am truly honored that the AIA has recognized me as a Fellow.”

 

In a career now in its fifth decade, Mr. Eben has served in more than forty different leadership positions, always acting tirelessly as an advocate and representative for the profession and the AIA. Soon after becoming a licensed architect, Jerry assumed leadership positions in AIA Newark and Suburban Architects, one of six (6) local sections of the Chapter.  In fact, he has served in every position available, in AIA-NJ and in each he has not only fulfilled his duties, but done more.  When his term as President of the Chapter coincided with the 150th anniversary of the AIA, he inaugurated an original public affairs effort, employing a firm to gain press and deploying 150 architects to visit middle and high schools from which they graduated during the annual National Architecture Week.

 

Jerry’s personal touch and grassroots approach have been the key to his ongoing success.  In 2011 he began a three-year stint on the AIA National Board, serving on various committees with a concentration on advocacy and reaching out to government officials regarding the elimination of urban Brownfields to help “bring back from the brink,” America’s cities.

 

From the time of his move to West Orange, he worked for the rehabilitation of the Edison Battery Building with the goal of enhancing the historic downtown.  Enlisting members of Congress from both sides of the aisle in this cause, he organized symposia to educate local leaders on the potential of these sites.  He has testified on Capitol Hill as an expert witness on the subject. He has spoken at AIA Conferences, teaching his colleagues how to promote beneficial legislation.

 

Jerry’s dedication to community is unrelenting.  He has written frequent opinion pieces in the local press, with the goal of educating the public of the importance of architecture and this commitment as an art, as well as a social necessity.

 

He strongly believes that the promotion of architecture and its profession must start with our children, future architects, clients, and citizens.  For thirty years, he has spoken to 10,000 young adults about making architecture a career choice.  His lectures include building safety ideas, so when you go on vacation and your child counts how many hotel room doors to the nearest fire exit, you know that they have heard this from one of Mr. Eben’s presentations.

 

This year begins Eben’s 45th in the AIA and as he has often stated, “that many of his former employers encouraged his involvement in the organization, and I want to sincerely thank them for the encouragement.  In addition, I want to thank friends and colleagues at the New Jersey Chapter of the American Institute of Architects and the support of my family for allowing me to participate.”

 

Out of a total AIA membership now surpassing 90,000, there are just three per cent distinguished with the honor of fellowship. The elevation to fellowship is conferred on architects with at least 10 years of membership in the AIA who have promoted the aesthetic, scientific, and practical efficiency of the profession; advanced the science and art of planning and building by advancing the standards of architectural education, training and practice; coordinated the building industry and the profession of architecture through leadership in the AIA and other related professional organizations; advanced the living standards of people through an improved environment; or made the profession of ever-increasing service to society.

 

To join the celebration at the AIA NJ Fellows Reception, find us at Copper Canyon Grill, 9101 International Dr #1220, Orlando FL at 6PM on April 27, 2017. Festivities hosted by President Elect, Verity Frizzell, AIA.

 
About AIA and AIA New Jersey

Founded in 1857, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) is the professional organization that helps architects serve the public’s needs and builds awareness of the role of architects and architecture in American society. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., its 300 plus local chapters represent 90,000 licensed architects and allied professionals. The organization’s local chapter, AIA New Jersey, has served as the voice of the architecture profession in the Garden State since 1900. Based in Trenton, AIA New Jersey has 2,000 members in six local sections. For more information, please visit www.aia-nj.org.

 

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Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! Porcelanosa – Exterior Facade Restoration, by CTS Group, wins an AIA NJ Honor Award in the historic preservation category.

red_eaglePORCELANOSA – EXTERIOR FACADE RESTORATION
CTS Group Porcelanosa.jpg
HISTORICAL NARRATIVE
202 Fifth Avenue which is located in New York City’s Madison Square North Historic District is a 6-story building constructed in 1918 as offices for the Thomas Cusack Company. Designed by architects Buchman & Kahn with Zimmerman, Saxe and Zimmerman the steel and reinforced concrete structure was faced with polychrome, glazed terra cotta which terminated in a large over-hanging cornice and a stone storefront with a stone cornice The highly visible 25th Street, south façade was originally treated as a promotional billboard, brightly lit after dark and covered with the firm’s name and services between windows and in a roof top sign.
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Major Building alterations commenced in the early 1940’s and continued for decades for new occupants and owners. These included removing window and closing all window opening son the south façade’s east and west bays and removing the extensive building-mounted signage. Decorative terra cotta spandrels were covered with stucco panels. Deteriorated terra cotta cornice brackets were removed and that cornice section was covered with stucco over wire lath. Finally the parapet was simplified and covered with stucco and the 1st floor storefront was completely replaced in 1991. The terra cotta
cornice and clad ding was adversely affected by limited maintenance. There was some response to the deterioration but virtually all was inappropriate. Remedial work included poor patching and the use of problematic and non-matching coatings over terra cotta facing, cornice and parapet elements.
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When Porcelanosa USA–a major European building tile and products manufacturer–acquired the property in 2012 it had twin goals. These were to create 21st century offices and showrooms for its American operations and to provide a 1st class exterior restoration which returned the façade to their original appearance and conditions to the greatest extent possible. The CTS Group was retained by Porcelanosa USA to prepare design and construction documents for the exterior restoration.
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FAÇADE RESTORATION
The Project included restoration of the existing polychrome terra cotta and stone façade elements. Although construction documents were generated based on extensive building surveys these were all from the ground. Once scaffolds were erected all facades were re-surveyed to confirm and add to the base scope of work. All terra cotta was cleaned which included the removal of numerous compound which required many mockups to achieve the correct effect. Removal of stucco cornice cladding revealed severely compromised structure all of which was replaced with new stainless steel structure and anchors. New terra cotta cornice features were fabricated based on existing remaining elements including some uncovered during the work. Openings on the south façade east and west bays which had altered and closed were re-opened. New terra cotta trim was fabricated for these openings as well as for all 6th floor lintels which had been damaged due to deteriorating steel supporting structure. Six carefully considered colors were chosen for the new terra cotta to match the dozen or so colors, and sheen, of the original.
Hundreds of ferrous anchors, which had been left in place from the building-mounted signage, were removed and patched with restoration mortar. Hundreds of additional areas of cracked and damaged terra cotta were patched as well. All patched terra cotta was coated with new glazing to match the colors and sheen of the original terra cotta.

Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! NJ Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health, by Ballinger, wins an AIA NJ Honor Award in the built project category.

red_eagleNJ INSTITUTE FOR FOOD, NUTRITION + HEALTH
Ballinger NJ Institute for food nutrition and health
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health (IFNH) underscores the
commitment of Rutgers University to new transformational initiatives across the many disciplines impacting food, nutrition, and health. The IFNH draws upon the strengths of the entire university as it physically co-locates and strategically aligns diverse disciplines to address society’s pressing challenges in cardio-inflammatory disease, cancer and obesity.
NJInstitute1
This interdisciplinary research building is the centerpiece of the Institute. The highly sustainable facility embodies the concepts of movement, activity, and wellness that are central to the Institute’s mission, while engaging local communities through its outreach focus to promote healthy lifestyles. The building features a student health clinic, a human performance lab, a nutrition research clinic, a healthy eating courtyard and a preschool dedicated to educating parents and children on diet and nutrition. The remaining spaces house wet and dry labs, faculty and administrative offices and outreach meeting spaces.
NJInstitute3
The sloping site for IFNH is located at the edge of the agricultural campus’ academic core overlooking bucolic research fields and barns to the south. Situated on a main campus pathway between the academic core to the northwest and residential precinct to the southeast, the building is located to maximize its outreach mission. The immediate adjacency to the Campus’s Food Science Building enables direct collaboration between the University and Institute.
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The site presents a “building in the round” challenge demanding unique responses to each of it’s four orientations including a new campus amphitheater and quad, vehicular court, pre-school play yard and a sloping meadow. The Institute coalesces beneath an iconic shading “parasol” which organizes the formally articulated programmatic elements and expresses the Institute’s commitment to sustainability. The terra-cotta rain screen clad “bar” positioned on the north side of the granite faced piano-nobile, consolidates the more private and cellular room functions, terminates the axis of the new campus quad and responds to the brick campus context. The bar also serves as the backdrop to the south facing, naturally lit, open research environment with panoramic views of the campus. An abundance of openness and transparency unites all of these functions into a convergent environment to reinforce the collaborative mission of the Institute.
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Organizing this open environment is a centrally positioned “hearth” that is the symbolic and functional nutrition source for the building. It is clad in sustainably sourced wood, sponsors an iconic green wall and formally integrates all three floors of the Institute’s diverse program with an adjacent open stair.
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Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! The Biotrial North America Headquarters, by Francis Cauffman, wins an AIA NJ Merit Award in the built open project category.

red_eaglebiotrial / north american headquarters / newark, nj
Francis Cauffman Biotrial.jpg
A contract research organization based in France with offices in Paris, London and Montreal, strategically sought an architecture firm to design a North American Headquarters. Setting a precedent for future city development, Francis Cauffman was engaged for the first phase of the research organization’s master plan located in the University Heights Science Park of Newark, NJ. Although 70,000 SF is considered modest, smaller and relatively narrow floor plates were opted for. This resulted in a five-story building that conveyed significant impact in its architectural design.
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transparentsolid / privatepublic / openclosed
The basic concept of the building is formed by two interlocking planes: one plane
made primarily of solid black brick with matching mortar and the other made of
a fritted curtain wall. Brick paneling on the east exterior surrounds the support
spaces, circulation areas and core of the building. The fritted curtain wall allows
sunlight into the lobby, office, and short/medium stay areas. Varying levels of
daylight create different patterns, resulting in an exterior that is not only visually
interesting, but also provides a layer of privacy. A ribbon of metal panels ties the
two planes together and represents the fluid nature of chemistry and science. This metal ribbon begins on the private side of the building by forming the canopy, moves through the building as the lobby ceiling, emerges on the public side as a frame for the vestibule and completes itself as the canopy for services.
biotrial3   biotrial4

Save the Date for AIA-NJ

Don’t forget to clear your calendar to attend these important AIA-NJ events…

May 19. NJ Re-Forum. Municipal Land Use Law. Details and registration here.

June 12. Architects Action Day. Register Here.

June 22. East Coast Green: Health, Safety & Wellness. Registration is open!

August 1. Community Resilience Course. Limited capacity; register here.

November 9-11. Quad States. AIA NJ Design Conference is at this event! Click here.