Author Archives: Bruce D. Turner, AIA

Sole proprietor architect working on commercial residential and municipal projects, both new construction and renovations/additions. Sustainable design; LEED ap

Governor Signs Good Samaritan Bill

AIA New Jersey is pleased to announce the successful completion of one of its major legislative initiatives with the enactment of the Good Samaritan bill signed by Governor Christie yesterday. The profession will be in a position to offer its services to the people of New Jersey during a declared disaster as a first responder with the protections afforded in this statute. We want to thank our prime Sponsor Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald and sponsors Assemblymen Moriarty and Chivukula and the Governor for their support. Below is a press release regarding the bill.

AIA-NJ President Jack Purvis AIA,  along with Homeland Security Committee Chair and Past President Laurence Parisi AIA, President Elect Kurt Kalafsky AIA, and 1st Vice President Kimberly Bunn AIA at press conference with Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald.

AIA-NJ President Jack Purvis AIA, along with Homeland Security Committee Chair and Past President Laurence Parisi AIA, President Elect Kurt Kalafsky AIA, and 1st Vice President Kimberly Bunn AIA at 2013 press conference with Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald.

Greenwald, Moriarty & Chivukula Bill to Help Improve Natural Disaster Response Signed into Law

(TRENTON) – Legislation sponsored by Assembly Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, Assemblyman Paul Moriarty and Assemblyman Upendra Chivukula to improve the state’s ability to respond to large-scale natural disasters has been inked into law.

The law (A-2025) bolsters safety inspection capacity in the aftermath of disasters like Superstorm Sandy – the scale of which can easily overwhelm local governments – by shielding licensed architects and professional engineers from liability when they volunteer to help local governments respond to major natural disasters.

“Whether it’s tornadoes in Alabama, earthquakes in California or hurricanes in New Jersey, Good Samaritan laws are critical in ensuring a safe, effective and speedy response to major natural disasters,” said Greenwald (D-Camden/Burlington). “By passing a Good Samaritan law in New Jersey, we better prepare our state to respond rapidly and efficiently to the next Superstorm Sandy.”

“Not having had this protection deterred many of these professionals from volunteering their services in times of critical need, which unduly restricted our ability to quickly and effectively provide safety inspections after a large-scale disaster,” said Moriarty (D-Camden/Gloucester). “We cannot afford to go without such valuable assistance when the next big storm hits.”

“These are professionals who are willing to volunteer their time, expertise and services to help rebuild communities that have been damaged by major natural disasters,” said Chivukula (D-Middlesex/Somerset). “With the weather expected to become even more severe in the future, it will be wise to have people with expertise who are ready and able to help when the time comes.”

Nearly 400 architects stood ready to use their professional expertise to assist in assessing storm-damaged properties in New York City days after Superstorm Sandy hit, according to a 2013 Crain’s New York Business article. The specter of thousands – if not millions – of dollars in potential lawsuit liability deterred the vast majority from volunteering their assistance, leaving local officials overwhelmed by the scale of the task.

In contrast, Alabama’s Good Samaritan law, enacted in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina, was crucial in the aftermath of devastating tornadoes that in April 2011 killed 64 people and caused $2.2 billion in damage. In response to the devastating category EF-4 tornado, over 200 professionals volunteered nearly 1,300 hours in Tuscaloosa alone, inspecting over 7,000 buildings for safety–critical assistance given the municipality’s limited staff resources.

Under the law, licensed architects or professional engineers would remain liable for the full extent of damages caused by their own acts or omissions that are wanton, willful or grossly negligent.

We are very pleased that the governor has signed the Good Samaritan legislation, particularly with widespread support from both the the Assembly and Senate. By removing prohibitive regulations against building professionals, the Act will allow trained architects and other professionals to quickly and effectively respond to pressing infrastructural issues in times of emergency.  This legislation reflects the mission of the AIA to contribute its collective expertise when it is needed most, which is crucial in the planning and rebuilding of New Jersey’s communities. We commend lead sponsor and Majority Leader Lou Greenwald, along with sponsors Paul Moriarity and Upendra Chivukula, for their sound and rational advocacy of this bill.

AIA New Jersey Endorses Jerry Eben, AIA for AIA National Secretary

Grassroots 2009

 

Jerome Leslie Eben, AIA

Jerome Leslie Eben, AIA

 

 

June 10, 2014

To My Fellow Delegates to the AIA Convention

Re: Jerome Leslie Eben, AIA

Dear Delegates:

As President of AIA New Jersey, I am honored to write this support letter for a colleague and friend who as dedicated more than three decades to OUR profession and to the Institute that supports the architects and architecture across the country. Jerome Leslie Eben, AIA is second to none in the efforts he has delivered to the nearly two thousand members in this Chapter and Region.

I have served on the AIA-NJ Board with Jerry for the past five years, where he has served over twenty years. I continue to look to him for guidance based on his experience and historical knowledge of our diverse chapter. Over his career, he has served and continues to serve as a mentor to chapter leaders and to countless AIA emerging professionals. His work with advocacy here in New Jersey, where the entire congressional delegation knows his name, makes him most valuable to us and the legislation we support that helps us in our practices.

There is no doubt that he has strong leadership skills, as evidenced by his selection to testify in front of a Congressional Committee in regard to cleaning up and returning urban brownfields back on the tax rolls where they belong. Lastly his effort in raising funds for ArchiPAC and then for his 2013 Class project of bringing emerging professionals to the AIA Convention are well known.

Please see the attached flyer for more information about Jerry and please join us in supporting him for the prestigious position on the new AIA Board as Secretary of the Institute.

Most sincerely,

Kurt Kalafsky, AIA
President, AIA New Jersey
 

To see a PDF of this letter Click Here

Jerry Eben AIA – Candidate for AIA National Secretary

“Jerry Eben is AIA”

Jerome_Leslie_Eben,_AIA_Campaign__2015_Final (1) copy

 

2014 AIA‐West Jersey – Emerging Professionals Design Competition

AIA WJ Community Rocks Logo

COMMUNITY ROCKS! THE BLOCKS – RV
AIA‐West Jersey is offering Emerging Professionals the opportunity to design a mobile music, art studio and community outreach vehicle. AIA‐West Jersey has partnered with Community Rocks!, a non‐profit organization established to educate, strengthen and connect communities through arts and wellness programs, partnerships and relief work.

What is Community Rocks! the Blocks?

Based in Oaklyn, NJ, this program provides relief supplies to neighbors in need. Throughout the year the program collects, sorts and deliver supplies to various relief centers, churches, community spaces, individuals and families. Now, there is a plan to expand the program. The Community Rocks! RV will tour Camden, Camden County & Burlington County providing music, art and exercise programs to children, neighborhoods and community centers in need.

This is where AIAWJ joins the effort.

The RV is retro‐chic from the 1980s, but needs significant upgrades to achieve the following programmatic needs. This is the focus the competition:

  1. Art Studio / Classroom inside the RV for up to 8 children.
  2. Music Classroom inside the RV for up to 8 children.
  3. “Hang‐Out” Space for up to 4 children.
  4. Mobile Stage / Sound System with Speaker Hook‐up Outside the RV.
  5. Flexible Signage System on RV exterior.
  6. Storage of tents, art supplies, and equipment.
  7. Retain sink and toilet functions.
  8. Child generated art piece for interior or exterior of RV.
  9. Storage of goods and supplies to be delivered to local charities.

Safety, Health and Welfare

Safety of the occupants is paramount. The RV will be used to educate, stimulate and uplift children in underserved communities. This can only be achieved in safe environment. The RV will serve the children while parked, no programming will take place while the RV is in motion.

Additional Requirements

  1. Use of Community Rocks! Colors: Pink, Brown, Green and Yellow. (See Logo)
  2. Paint Exterior of RV – Pink Base Coat
  3. Display boards 30×40 inches depicting proposed designs.

BreastFest – The Tyanna Foundation

Sara O’Brien, Founder and Director of Community Rocks!, along with her sisters, also founded The Tyanna Foundation, which works to increase awareness and generate money for breast cancer research, services, education, treatment and patient care for local breast cancer patients and survivors. The major fundraiser for the foundation is BreastFest, a fun filled festival for the entire family offering food, drink, activities and live entertainment. To date the foundation has raised over $1,000,000 through events held in 5 different states.

Schedule

Entries due to AIA‐West Jersey, Monday, June 2, 2014.

All entries will be displayed in front of the RV at BreastFest New Jersey, on June 7th, 2014, behind The Taproom and Grill in Haddon Township. Community Rocks! and The Tyanna Foundation board members and the general public will be given the opportunity to comment on the designs and ultimately select a winner.

 AIA WJ 2014 Design Competition RV Photo

Resources

Community Rocks! Website – www.communityrocks.com
The Tyanna Foundation Website – www.tyanna.org
Sara O’Brien Website – www.saraobrien.com
AIA‐West Jersey Contact: Mark Barone, AIA – markb@markbaronearchitect.com

 

If you are interested please contact Mark Barone, AIA by the end of business, Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Thank you.

 

 

AIA South & West Jersey Joint Meeting

Functional Resilience:  The New Sustainability
Greg Winkler, AIA of Mid-Atlantic Precast Association

May 13, 2013 – Annata Wine Bar, Hammonton
5 pm to 9 pm

 

AIA__May_2014_Invitation_final

AIA South Jersey Member Meeting

AIASJ Feb 25 2014

AIA South Jersey Meeting

AIA_SJ_December_2013_Meeting_Notice_Color

“Bridgeton Rose” Historic Preservation Awards Program

“BRIDGETON ROSE” HISTORIC PRESERVATION AWARDS PROGRAM ON NOVEMBER 13 FEATURES FAMOUS ARCHITECTS AND HISTORIC CHURCHES

Bridgeton, October 23, 2013. Do the names: Strickland–Eyre–Sloan–Furness–Venturi–mean anything to you? If so, you probably know more than a little something about historic American architecture.

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First Presbyterian Church

But even you could get an unexpected boost in your learning curve on Wednesday, November 13, when the City of Bridgeton Historic District Commission and the Center for Historic American Building Arts partner up for a third year’s celebration of the state’s largest historic district with the “Bridgeton Rose Awards,” and to thank those whose stewardship has benefited some of the district’s thousands of historic and architectural treasures.

“Our special theme this year is the great architects who stopped by Bridgeton to drop off some of their work,” says James Livoti, AIA, the Commission chairman and resident architect. “People may be a little surprised to see how many of them came through here. As an architectural legacy, it really does Bridgeton proud.”

The awards event will be held at Bonham Hall of the First Presbyterian Church, 119 West Commerce Street. The church itself, once known as “West Presbyterian,” was designed by the great Philadelphia architect, Samuel Sloan.

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A Second Empire Victorian (East Avenue)

In fact, Bridgeton churches have a special niche in the event program this year. The featured speaker is author Frank Greenagel, the authority on historic New Jersey churches whose most recent book is The Cumberland Churchscape. “As religious communities invested in major construction,” he says, “they often commanded the design skills of big-name architects.” But he adds that the area’s bounty of architected churches “is complemented by the beauty and character of some of its vernacular treasures.”

Flavia Alaya, the cultural historian who created the awards program and now heads CHABA, the Center for Historic American Building Arts in Bridgeton, promises a few surprises among the awards this year. “Expect to learn about some of the gems that need a spotlight to be appreciated,” she says. “Our goal is to highlight preservation as a tool for enhancing the district’s economic development potential,” she says, and adds that her own favorites among this year’s awardees are the smaller buildings and homes, gardens and neighborhoods that “people love and come together around.”

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A Lake Street home believed to be based on a Wilson Eyre design

“An awards program is a way of giving credit where it’s due, up at the top and in the middle and down at the grassroots too,” she says, “where the only incentive may be a spirit of caring, respect for what’s beautiful, and a will to add to everybody’s quality of life.”

She is quick to add that it doesn’t hurt to be able to point with pride to the handiwork of some of America’s finest architects. “It means that the largest historic district in the state–over 2000 properties–is large for a reason: it offers what Bridgeton alone CAN offer in this dense megalopolis of the Northeast corridor–a small, walkable postindustrial town with the entire American story, and the whole spectrum of American architecture, all in the palm of your hand–or maybe under the soles of your feet. How many small towns within an hour of Philly and two of New York can say that?”

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A vernacular single-family home on New Street in the Glen View section of the District

A brief meet and greet at 5:30 PM with sophisticated refreshments and musical entertainment will take attendees straight into the highly visual awards program, which runs to 7:30 PM. Ample free parking is available around the church. Tickets at $30 benefit the City of Bridgeton Historic Preservation Trust Fund, dedicated to the care of publicly-owned historic sites in the city.

Tickets are now available at Hankins Bros. (12 Broad Street) and the Cohansey Cafe (21 E. Commerce St.). They may also be purchased at the door on November 13.

Contact:
City of Bridgeton: Roberta Copeland: copelandr@cityofbridgeton.com 856-451-3407 x 2
CHABA: Flavia Alaya: flaviaalaya@gmail.com
the Center for Historic American Building Arts [chaba]
http://www.historicbuildingarts.org
ReVisioning New Jersey’s Largest Historic District
31 West Commerce Street
Bridgeton, NJ 08302
centerhabarts@gmail.com

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Exalting the Word Church on South Avenue

Design Guidelines for Elevating Historic Buildings in NJ

red_eagleCALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

The Historic Resources Committee of

 AIA New Jersey

 is preparing

Design Guidelines for Elevating Historic Buildings in NJ

Owners of buildings in areas subject to flooding face a future that requires effective and thoughtful planning. Community flood hazard mitigation techniques (such as dune creation and drainage improvements) in concert with specific building techniques (such as resilient finishes, structural reinforcement and the relocation of utilities and systems) will reduce but not eliminate risk of serous damage in all cases.

Historic Guidelines PhotoAccording to data from the NJ Department of Environmental Protection/Historic Preservation Office, more than 30,000 historic properties lie wholly or partially within the flood plain. Even if a small percentage of these structures are raised, the number would be large and the impact great.

As a first step in the preparation of these guidelines, AIA-NJ is soliciting examples of likely candidates for elevation and existing buildings that have already been elevated or are in the process of being elevated from fellow architects, colleagues in engineering and construction, property owners and all other interested parties.

HOW AND WHAT TO SUBMIT

Please submit photos of actual examples (current or before and after) and all other pertinent information (including the property address and the name & contact information of the submitter) via email to elevate@aia-nj.org by Monday, November 4, 2013. Limit emails to no more than 7 megs (larger submissions will require multiple emails).

FUTURE STEPS

AIA-NJ will meet on November 9th to review the submission and to select as many as 12 examples to be investigated further, developed and possibly used as case studies and examples of best practices in forthcoming Guidelines.  The results of this call for submissions will be released in early 2014.  The information gathered is intended to provide guidance to owners of existing and historic buildings, local historic commissions and design professionals.

QUESTIONS?

Via email to elevate@aia-nj.org

Via fax to 609 884 8608

Via phone to 609 849 8410

Emerging Professionals Showcase

AIANJ PechaKucha 101713

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