Author Archives: AIA New Jersey

AIANJ Election Open

AIAeagle_2016Voting opened June 10th, and will continue until June 24th, for the election of AIA New Jersey’s next AIA Regional Representative.  Two qualified candidates have put their names forward to represent you the AIANJ members on nationals Strategic Council –

See each candidates statements and information here.

 

      Laurence Parisi, AIA        

               Bruce Turner, AIA     

 

parisi_2012BDT2

 

 

 

 

 

 

              

                 

If you did not get an email for AIA New Jersey through SimplyVoting.com please contact the AIANJ office (Lori Lee).  Also, make sure to check your spam filters.
Voting is very easy and only takes a few minutes, please have your voice be heard.

 

 

 

GRAPHISOFT Announces Winners of Inaugural ARCHICAD Student Design Competition

graphisoft-logo-grey

aiawj

logoGRAPHISOFT North America, in partnership with award-winning ARCHICAD firm, Kitchen & Associates (K&A) and AIA West Jersey, proudly announce the winners of the inaugural student design competition. The competition coincided with the annual American Institute of Architects (AIA) Convention in Philadelphia, PA.

Students from across the United States, currently enrolled in architectural or interior design programs (graduate and undergraduate) were challenged to design temporary, mobile visitor centers in ARCHICAD, using shipping containers, which could be situated in popular event locations across Philadelphia, the AIA Conference host city. The top three mobile visitor center designs received a total of $3,000 in cash prizes. Numerous entries were received from universities and colleges across the United States.

The students approached the challenge with a unique perspective. ARCHICAD gave our winner the tools he needed to shine,” said Jason Lutz, President, AIA West Jersey. “When the BIM tool fuels design freedom and supports creativity – success is nearly a guarantee.”

First place and a cash award of $1,500 went to Alessandro Pupillo, a graduate of Broward College’s two-year Architecture program. Pupillo plans to enter Florida Atlantic University in the fall to continue his education in Architecture. Second place went to Trevor Houghton, a junior studying Construction Management at California Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo. Our third place winner was Akinet Nagdive, a graduate of Iowa State University’s Architecture program, class of 2016.

Pupillo received formal ARCHICAD training at Broward after first learning AutoCAD at the high school level. Pupillo says he found the transition from that software to ARCHICAD’s 3D modeling to be a simple one.

“ARCHICAD is extremely user-friendly. I was able to build on experience with AutoCAD and made good use of the competition design template. I have had the opportunity to use a variety of BIM software and can say that I really enjoy working with ARCHICAD.”
Pupillo’s rendering caught the attention of the distinguished judging panel, assembled from GRAPHISOFT staff, ARCHICAD professors, AIA West Jersey board members, and K&A staff.

Review of the entries by such an esteemed panel gave the competitors the opportunity to have their skills evaluated by those in the industry who are actively seeking new talent.
“In a competitive job market, students need a well-rounded exposure to BIM solutions. For us and many firms like us, ARCHICAD skills are in high demand,” explained Stephen Schoch, Managing Principal at K&A. “We hope to add to our workforce from the entrant pool, because they bring high value to an existing workflow.”

To see the winning design and to learn more about the grand prize winner, please visit the GRAPHISOFT North America blog, BIM Engine by ARCHICAD

Second Annual I Look Up Film Challenge

The second annual I Look Up Film Challenge launched at AIA Convention 2016

The challenge begins. Register by July 10 to make your mark.

AIAeagle_2016The I Look Up Challenge calls upon filmmakers to share their vision with a 2-3 minute video exploring the power of architecture to create solutions and uplift communities. Take on the competition. Take the challenge.

Participants must register by July 10. Find complete submissions rules and guidelines here.

Film challenge prompt: Architecture as a solution

It’s time two great storytellers came together – filmmakers and architects – to shine a light on the innovative design work being done all over the country. Your film should explore how architecture has solved a problem facing us today. It can be on any scale you like, from the smallest building to the entire nation. Together, with you, we can tell these important stories that need to be told.

Find More Information

 

Call for Submissions AIA Awards 2017

 

Call for subissions: AIA Awards 2017
Twenty-five Year Award recipient Monterey Bay Aquarium
ARCHITECT: EHDD | PHOTO: Bruce Damonte
Show us your best work 
AIA Awards celebrate the best buildings and spaces and the people behind them. These projects are in a class of their own and are innovative, beautifully designed, and improve lives and communities around the globe.

Get ready to show us your best work. We’re now accepting submissions for the following 2017 AIA Awards:

Architecture
This award celebrates stunning contemporary architecture of any type, size, budget, or style.

Interior Architecture
This award honors innovative and spectacular interior spaces including new construction, renovations, and restorations.

Regional & Urban Design
This award recognizes the best in urban design, regional and city planning, and community development.

Twenty-five Year 
This award showcases precedent-setting buildings that have stood the test of time for 25–35 years and continue to set standards of excellence.

Learn more

Questions? [email protected]

 

EPiC Post-Convention Newsletter

725dfd09-9161-4587-96a9-478e64608e4a

EPiC Moments at
AIA National Convention 2016

Many of AIA New Jersey Emerging Professionals were able to take advantage of the AIA national convention being in Philadelphia this year, even if they only attended one event.  EPiC put a recap of the convention in the latest newsletter.

97a20cf1-0cff-4f05-b5fe-9fdffa2736e2Join us next year in Orlando, April 27 – 29, 2017

View the Full EPiC Newsletter here.

Earth Day Irony

AIAeagle_2016By Russell A. Davidson, FAIA

As the U.S. Senate passed its long-delayed energy bill April 21, the irony was acute. Here was the world’s greatest deliberative body voting to kill carbon-cutting requirements for the federal government – on the eve of Earth Day and the signing of the COP 21 climate treaty in Paris.

In three short lines in more than 800-pages of legislation, the Senate repealed a policy that is already helping buildings owned by Uncle Sam – the nation’s largest landlord – cut greenhouse gas emissions. Specifically, the Senate voted to eliminate Section 433 from the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which requires that new and majorly renovated federal buildings meet incremental targets leading to net zero energy consumption by 2030. The House last year also voted to repeal this provision in the landmark statute, an action which President Obama at the time said he would veto.

Through design, our profession is helping guide building owners, consumers and governments – particularly Uncle Sam – to be leaders in energy conservation and reduced dependence on the use of fossil fuels. Residential and commercial buildings account for almost 40 percent of both total U.S. energy consumption and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. According to government statistics, better designed buildings have already saved our country approximately $560 billion in energy costs since 2005.

So why is Congress so determined to roll back this common-sense and money-saving provision? Section 433’s opponents (primarily the fossil fuel lobby) claim that it is simply too difficult to implement. But that ignores the realities of a market where such renovated federal buildings like the Wayne Aspinall federal courthouse in Colorado and the Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building in Portland, Ore. are meeting the 2030 targets right now. In fact, the renovated Portland building was delivered 10 months early, saving taxpayers more than $900,000 in the process.

Meanwhile, stakeholders from a broad array of industries have been working with the Energy Department to implement this rule in a way that is smart, efficient, and effective.

Requiring significant energy reduction targets in new and majorly renovated federal buildings demonstrates to the private sector that Uncle Sam can set an example for other nations to follow. The targets help spur the development of new materials, construction techniques, and technologies to make buildings more energy efficient. And they show that significant energy reductions are both practical and cost- effective.

That’s why not only architects, but more than 300 other groups oppose efforts to weaken this energy-saving policy. We hope this short- sighted repeal is stripped from any bill that emerges from a House-Senate conference. And if it isn’t, the president should veto this mis- guided legislation.

Russell A. Davidson, FAIA, is president of the American Institute of Architects.

Happy Birthday Frank Lloyd Wright

In honor of Frank Lloyd Wright’s birthday AIANJ was able to connect AIANJ member, Dan Nichols, AIA, with Curbed Philadelphia to showcase the architect’s and his wife’s home.  Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1950 the JA Sweeton residence was designed on a budget.  The homeowners recently completed a restoration to repair the Usonian Home.

Time and time again, Dan Nichols has told the story of how he became an architect. “I first learned of Wright when I was about 10 years old growing up in the suburbs of Philadelphia, in an old magazine that featured his work. His houses were a big deal to me,” Nichols once told Curbed. “It all tied together, and I pursued a career in architecture.”

Read the full article on Curbed Philadelphia.

 

 

WIANJ – SpeakEasy: Former FBI executive: Ignore the barriers

AIANJ Women in Architecture meeting was held May 26th.

Article originally printed in NJBIZ, click here for full article.wia2016_LaurenAndersen

SpeakEasy is a running feature in NJBIZ in which we recap presentations given by key business leaders around the state. This report is based on a speech delivered by Lauren Anderson, a consultant and former FBI executive, on May 26 at a gathering of women in architecture hosted by Hoagland, Longo, Moran, Dunst & Doukas in New Brunswick.

As she spoke to a female audience from the New Jersey Society of Architects, Lauren Anderson said her former role as an FBI executive and her current role of geopolitical consultant, security and crisis expert and public speaker seemingly gave her little in common with those in the room.

Then she let out the connection: Like all of them, she knows all about being a female in a male-dominated industry.

“I went up to the second supervisor I ever had at the FBI and directly said to him, ‘I want the opportunity to have a certain kind of case,’” she said. “And he said, ‘Well, you’re the best female agent I’ve ever seen.’”

“I told him, ‘When you can say I’m the best agent you’ve ever seen, then we’ll have something to talk about.’”

Anderson had plenty to talk about in her presentation before a room of 30 late last month. Architecture, after all, has a gender challenge.

While 42 percent of architecture graduates are women, only an estimated 15 to 18 percent move on to become licensed professionals, resulting in a workforce that is disproportionately male.

Anderson discussed the steps necessary to prepare, develop and inspire women to take their fair and equal share of leadership roles.

Speaking at the New Brunswick offices of Hoagland, Longo, Moran, Dunst & Doukas, Anderson urged the other women in the room to take on the challenge.

“Don’t let things stop you just because you perceive or see barriers in front of you in your profession, firm or anywhere along the way,” she said. “Just think of it as noise.

“It’s just extraneous noise, so try to just block it out and stay focused on what you want.”

Anderson stressed the importance of networking events, such as this gathering of women in architecture, as a great tool in fighting that noise.

But she also encouraged women to network outside of their professional circles.

“One of the things I didn’t do well until very late in my career was to realize that it would benefit me personally and professionally to start reaching out to people outside my profession,” she said. “I have a network now of all these amazing women around the world, some who are professors; others are senior members of telecommunications companies in Europe or at Texas Instruments.

“It was so amazing to be with these women, hear about these experiences and realize that I had thought, up to that point in time, that no one could understand what I was going through and what the challenges were if they weren’t in my profession. And that wasn’t true.”

Architecture, she said, actually has come a long way.

In preparation for her talk, Anderson said she came across a piece of history that astounded her.

It was the story of Louise Blanchard Bethune, who opened her own architecture practice in 1881 and is identified as the first woman architect in the United States.

“On the centennial anniversary of her death, they had a ceremony and laid a tombstone on her grave,” she said.

Why is that a big deal? Anderson explained.

“Up until that time, the tombstone where she was buried only reflected her husband’s name and dates — nothing on her,” she said. “It’s a fascinating bit of trivia that it took 100 years for people to recognize who she is and put a grave marker on her grave that reflected who she was.

“And her husband was an architect, but she was an architect before meeting her husband.”

E-mail to: [email protected]

 

PhilAIAdelphia Convention Recap from Across the River

The 2016 AIA Convention just finished and Philadelphia was a great host to architects and design professionals from around the world.  AIA New Jersey members were able to take advantage of the close location of convention this year and it was wonderful to see so many of us attending.

2016NJ_Fellows

(L to R) AIANJ President Justin Mihalik AIA, Dean Marchetto FAIA, Michael Schnoering FAIA, and AIANJ President Elect Ben Lee AIA

Congratulations to the newest NJ fellows who were inducted during the convention:  Michael Schnoering, FAIA and Dean Marchetto, FAIA.

An AIANJ Fellows Reception to honor our AIANJ fellows was held on Thursday, May 19th, on the 24th floor of the Hotel Palomar.   Thanks to our event sponsor – Andersen Windows and Doors for hosting AIANJ for this wonderful evening.

The hotel was an appropriately location as it is also know as The Architect’s Building is a 1929 Art Deco tower that originally designed by a consortium of 20 architects and was the longtime home of AIA Philadelphia.

See Photos of the Fellows Reception here.

KA2016_conv2

AIAWJ President Jason Lutz speaking at Graphisoft Student Design Competition event at Kitchen & Associates.

A number of local NJ architecture firms hosted a variety of events, including KSS, Gensler, and Kitchen & Associates.   Including the announcement of the winners of the Inaugural ARCHICAD Student Design Competition.

Friday night of the convention an open house in the Collingwood, NJ, office of K&A was the stage for the announcement of the winners and a presentation by Graphisoft.

The design competition used shipping containers and sites centered around Philadelphia and the AIA Convention and was sponsored by Graphisoft, Kitchen & Associates and AIA West Jersey.

Find out more about the competition here.

2016Lazarus_conv

AIANJ’s Steve Lazarus speaking at the AIA Annual Business Meeting.

AIANJ’s Treasurer, Steve Lazarus AIA served on the AIA Credentials Committee and gave a brief report during the Annual Business Meeting.

If you weren’t able to attend, find some of what you missed at PhilAIAdelphia.

President’s Message – Time For Thanks

JAM_headshotDid you know that 50% of our military forces are made up of the part-time personnel?  I did not either until I attended an event at the Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst called Seven Seals Boss Lift, which is an annual event hosted by the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserves (ESGR).  The ESGR is a Department of Defense office that was established in 1972 to promote cooperation and understanding between Reserve Component Service members and their civilian employers.  This event occurs every year and its purpose is to thank employers who hire members of the Reserves and the Guard and to allow them a peek into the lives of their employees when they leave for training and what they do when they are at training.  As a participant I experienced the training of our medics in a brand new facility with state of the art “dummies” that are wirelessly controlled by military personnel during a training session in order to control heart rate, breathing rate, blood flow, eye function and the ability to communicate.  Additional experiences included a simulated roll-over in a HUM-V, a patrol of a village in the middle east that resulted in a firefight with members of the Taliban, refueling a jet fighter plane somewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, and best of all a ready to eat meal (MRE).  The simulators that are used at the Joint Base make this only one of two training facilities of its kind in the world for our Guard and Reservists.  The base serves as home and work to more than 44,000 Airmen, Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen, civilians and their family members having a considerable impact on the economy of NJ.

This was a two day event and at the close of the event there was a ceremony that entailed the signing of a document by all those employers who attended acknowledging their support of the ESGR and those Guard and Reservists who serve our country.  I was very proud to represent AIANJ at this event just to raise awareness to our members about this organization and especially for those AIA members who do serve as Guard and Reservists.  Currently AIA does not track members that have served or currently serve our country and so I took the time to meet with AIA Membership staff at the Convention to discuss this.  With the launch of the new AIA website and digital transformation, it is possible for them to include additional check off boxes on the member profile page so that AIA can capture this information and we can know just how many AIA members have served and are currently serving our Country.  I want to thank Louis DiGeronimo AIA who serves as the Northeast Chair for the ESGR for inviting me to this event.  Lou himself served in the US Army and operated a tank, and for as long as I have known him he has been involved as an Architect in military work including the design of a gymnasium in Kuwait during the Gulf War.

I also want to take the opportunity to thank all of our members who have served, are currently serving and those who have made the ultimate sacrifice to our Country.  The dedication and sacrifice that the men and women of our armed forces make to protect our country is a blessing to all of us that can experience the freedom that makes America the greatest country in the world.  I am proud to be an American and am the son of Sailor who was a Veteran of the Vietnam War.  Thanks Dad.

Sincerely,

Justin_sig

 

 

Justin A. Mihalik, AIA

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 64 other followers