Monthly Archives: April 2017

AIANJ 2017 Special Meeting

  AIA Special Meeting

All AIA New Jersey Members are welcome to attend the organization’s Special Meeting to review and vote on a ByLaws change.

Date:         Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Time:         6:00 pm
Location:  Trenton Country Club
201 Sullivan Way
Trenton, NJ 08628

**Due to the venue’s wardrobe policies, jeans are not permitted. Thank you.**

YAF Connection – Spring 2017

The focus of this quarter’s publication is Sheltering where AIA New Jersey’s Stephen Schoch, AIA, LEED-AP BD+C from Kitchen & Associates was a contributing writer.

YAF Connection is a quarterly publication created by members of the AIA Young Architects Forum, a community of Architects licensed less then ten years.

Interested in contributing for an upcoming publication? Topics include Global Practice, humanitarian work and the theme of Certification. Contact your YAF Regional Representative Jessica O’Donnell, AIA, for more information on article requirements.

WE GOT ONE!

By Jerome L Eben, FAIA

 

The line “we got one” comes from the 1984 film Ghostbusters.  I chose this as the title of this article after reading another article about the world’s first film studio, hence a connection to film.  The article appeared in my home town weekly, the West Orange Chronicle.  I look forward to reading this paper every week and normally turn first to an always interesting article about the township’s history.  Joseph Fagan is the author and serves as the official historian of West Orange.  West Orange like the AIA is nearly 160 years old. While on the National Board (2011-1013) I often spoke, and was extremely proud of the township’s architectural history.  Three of our founders were very much involved in designing and supervising some of the early architecture, that was built .  Richard Upjohn, FAIA designed two churches and Calvert Vaux, AIA and A.J. Davis, AIA were helped Fredrick Law Olmstead with the design of the first planned community in the nation call Llewelyn Park.

We all read stories in our local weeklies that will from time to time speak about architecture and planning.  I have found that most always the architect that is responsible for created these buildings is not mentioned.   Joe Fagan is a friend of mine and I sent him an E-mail after he wrote a beautiful story about two old school buildings in town and did not mention who the architects were.  Joe wrote back to me that he “is not qualified or well versed in architectural nomenclature to know the unique differences, so he keeps it simple.”  I told him where to find the architect’s name in the future and if he still has a hard time, to contact the West Orange Historic Commission. Marty Feitlowitz, AIA, is Vice Chairman and I am sure that he would be helpful in securing for him any information he requires about the architect of a specific building in town.

Joe’s article was entitled World’s first film studio in WO spawned global industry.  He described an oddly shaped small black building that sits behind a fence near the entrance of the Thomas Edison National Historical Park.  Joe went on to explain that the original building was built in 1893 and served as the first motion picture studio.  Called the “Black Maria,” because working inside it was like being in a police van, also referred to as black Marias.  The building was mounted on a circular track so that it could move with the sun, because the film speed was so slow that only natural sunlight would work in the production of these early films.

In this article, Joe gave credit to Bernard Grad, AIA a Newark Architect, who designed a replacement black Maria, in 1954, for the National Park Service.  This Black Maria still stands there today.  Maybe you and your children or grandchildren have visited it?

I immediately sent Joe an E-mail thanking him for providing the architectural credit, and so proclaiming in the spirit of when the Annie Potts announces to the Ghostbusters, “WE GOT ONE,” when a fancy Manhattan hotel calls asking for the ghost exterminating specialists.

Joe Fagan, is ONE journalist who now knows that when he writes about history and it includes the mentioning of a building, we can be sure that the proper credit of the architect’s name will appear in the article.

You can get involved in this educational process, by pointing out to your local journalists who might write about a building…………any building, that the proper credit should be given to the architect who designed it.  Should the architect not be mentioned, take five minutes and write an E-mail to that journalist and remind him/her that “every building has an architect, or should have one!”   If each of the nearly 2,000 of you takes on this charge, we will begin to have more of them and state that we have TWO, THREE, or MORE journalists providing the public with the pertinent information that the building they are writing about was designed by and architect.

Thank you!

Jerry

12th Annual AIAWJ Photography Competition

AIA West Jersey Annual Architectural Photography Competition

2017 – Call for Entries

AIA West Jersey Photography Competition

AIA West Jersey is accepting entries to the 12th Annual Photography Competition.   Submit your interesting images of everything architectural – from the buildings around the corner to a new place you visit.

ELIGIBILITY: Competition is open to all AIA members and affiliates, students and the general public.

Best Overall Entry – Bruges Church Glenn Goldman, FAIA

 


ENTRY DEADLINE:

September 7, 2017

CATEGORIES:

Color
Black & White

AWARDS:
Each year three cash prizes are awarded for Overall Best Entry, Best Color, and Best Black & White.  All entries are narrowed by a jury to select the top finalists, these finalists are put online for a public vote to selected the 3 prize winning photographs, the cover image of the calendar and 12 “monthly” images that will be printed in the 2018 AIA-WJ Calendar.

Best Overall Entry   – $ 250 prize
Best Color   – $ 150 prize
Best Black & White  – $ 150 prize

CONGRATULATIONS to the 2016 AWARDS:

2016 Best Color
Kennebunkport Chapel
Amy Nowak-Palmerini, AIA

Best Overall Entry –
Bruges Church
Glenn Goldman, FAIA

2016 Best Color –
Kennebunkport Chapel
Amy Nowak-Palmerini, AIA

2016 Best Black & White –
Palace Stairway
Jacob Goldman

 

2016 Best B&W
Palace Stairway
Jacob Goldman

THANK YOU to our 2016 participants

 

Additional Information about the competition or questions please contact :
Kimberly Bunn, AIA – Photography Competition Chair
856-234-7367   or    [email protected]

LEARN MORE:

Get more information, Click here.

Download Competition Entry Form here.

Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! Porcelanosa – Exterior Facade Restoration, by CTS Group, wins an AIA NJ Honor Award in the historic preservation category.

red_eaglePORCELANOSA – EXTERIOR FACADE RESTORATION
CTS Group Porcelanosa.jpg
HISTORICAL NARRATIVE
202 Fifth Avenue which is located in New York City’s Madison Square North Historic District is a 6-story building constructed in 1918 as offices for the Thomas Cusack Company. Designed by architects Buchman & Kahn with Zimmerman, Saxe and Zimmerman the steel and reinforced concrete structure was faced with polychrome, glazed terra cotta which terminated in a large over-hanging cornice and a stone storefront with a stone cornice The highly visible 25th Street, south façade was originally treated as a promotional billboard, brightly lit after dark and covered with the firm’s name and services between windows and in a roof top sign.
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Major Building alterations commenced in the early 1940’s and continued for decades for new occupants and owners. These included removing window and closing all window opening son the south façade’s east and west bays and removing the extensive building-mounted signage. Decorative terra cotta spandrels were covered with stucco panels. Deteriorated terra cotta cornice brackets were removed and that cornice section was covered with stucco over wire lath. Finally the parapet was simplified and covered with stucco and the 1st floor storefront was completely replaced in 1991. The terra cotta
cornice and clad ding was adversely affected by limited maintenance. There was some response to the deterioration but virtually all was inappropriate. Remedial work included poor patching and the use of problematic and non-matching coatings over terra cotta facing, cornice and parapet elements.
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When Porcelanosa USA–a major European building tile and products manufacturer–acquired the property in 2012 it had twin goals. These were to create 21st century offices and showrooms for its American operations and to provide a 1st class exterior restoration which returned the façade to their original appearance and conditions to the greatest extent possible. The CTS Group was retained by Porcelanosa USA to prepare design and construction documents for the exterior restoration.
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FAÇADE RESTORATION
The Project included restoration of the existing polychrome terra cotta and stone façade elements. Although construction documents were generated based on extensive building surveys these were all from the ground. Once scaffolds were erected all facades were re-surveyed to confirm and add to the base scope of work. All terra cotta was cleaned which included the removal of numerous compound which required many mockups to achieve the correct effect. Removal of stucco cornice cladding revealed severely compromised structure all of which was replaced with new stainless steel structure and anchors. New terra cotta cornice features were fabricated based on existing remaining elements including some uncovered during the work. Openings on the south façade east and west bays which had altered and closed were re-opened. New terra cotta trim was fabricated for these openings as well as for all 6th floor lintels which had been damaged due to deteriorating steel supporting structure. Six carefully considered colors were chosen for the new terra cotta to match the dozen or so colors, and sheen, of the original.
Hundreds of ferrous anchors, which had been left in place from the building-mounted signage, were removed and patched with restoration mortar. Hundreds of additional areas of cracked and damaged terra cotta were patched as well. All patched terra cotta was coated with new glazing to match the colors and sheen of the original terra cotta.

Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! NJ Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health, by Ballinger, wins an AIA NJ Honor Award in the built project category.

red_eagleNJ INSTITUTE FOR FOOD, NUTRITION + HEALTH
Ballinger NJ Institute for food nutrition and health
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition and Health (IFNH) underscores the
commitment of Rutgers University to new transformational initiatives across the many disciplines impacting food, nutrition, and health. The IFNH draws upon the strengths of the entire university as it physically co-locates and strategically aligns diverse disciplines to address society’s pressing challenges in cardio-inflammatory disease, cancer and obesity.
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This interdisciplinary research building is the centerpiece of the Institute. The highly sustainable facility embodies the concepts of movement, activity, and wellness that are central to the Institute’s mission, while engaging local communities through its outreach focus to promote healthy lifestyles. The building features a student health clinic, a human performance lab, a nutrition research clinic, a healthy eating courtyard and a preschool dedicated to educating parents and children on diet and nutrition. The remaining spaces house wet and dry labs, faculty and administrative offices and outreach meeting spaces.
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The sloping site for IFNH is located at the edge of the agricultural campus’ academic core overlooking bucolic research fields and barns to the south. Situated on a main campus pathway between the academic core to the northwest and residential precinct to the southeast, the building is located to maximize its outreach mission. The immediate adjacency to the Campus’s Food Science Building enables direct collaboration between the University and Institute.
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The site presents a “building in the round” challenge demanding unique responses to each of it’s four orientations including a new campus amphitheater and quad, vehicular court, pre-school play yard and a sloping meadow. The Institute coalesces beneath an iconic shading “parasol” which organizes the formally articulated programmatic elements and expresses the Institute’s commitment to sustainability. The terra-cotta rain screen clad “bar” positioned on the north side of the granite faced piano-nobile, consolidates the more private and cellular room functions, terminates the axis of the new campus quad and responds to the brick campus context. The bar also serves as the backdrop to the south facing, naturally lit, open research environment with panoramic views of the campus. An abundance of openness and transparency unites all of these functions into a convergent environment to reinforce the collaborative mission of the Institute.
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Organizing this open environment is a centrally positioned “hearth” that is the symbolic and functional nutrition source for the building. It is clad in sustainably sourced wood, sponsors an iconic green wall and formally integrates all three floors of the Institute’s diverse program with an adjacent open stair.
NJInstitute2.jpg

Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! The Biotrial North America Headquarters, by Francis Cauffman, wins an AIA NJ Merit Award in the built open project category.

red_eaglebiotrial / north american headquarters / newark, nj
Francis Cauffman Biotrial.jpg
A contract research organization based in France with offices in Paris, London and Montreal, strategically sought an architecture firm to design a North American Headquarters. Setting a precedent for future city development, Francis Cauffman was engaged for the first phase of the research organization’s master plan located in the University Heights Science Park of Newark, NJ. Although 70,000 SF is considered modest, smaller and relatively narrow floor plates were opted for. This resulted in a five-story building that conveyed significant impact in its architectural design.
biotrial1
transparentsolid / privatepublic / openclosed
The basic concept of the building is formed by two interlocking planes: one plane
made primarily of solid black brick with matching mortar and the other made of
a fritted curtain wall. Brick paneling on the east exterior surrounds the support
spaces, circulation areas and core of the building. The fritted curtain wall allows
sunlight into the lobby, office, and short/medium stay areas. Varying levels of
daylight create different patterns, resulting in an exterior that is not only visually
interesting, but also provides a layer of privacy. A ribbon of metal panels ties the
two planes together and represents the fluid nature of chemistry and science. This metal ribbon begins on the private side of the building by forming the canopy, moves through the building as the lobby ceiling, emerges on the public side as a frame for the vestibule and completes itself as the canopy for services.
biotrial3   biotrial4

Save the Date for AIA-NJ

Don’t forget to clear your calendar to attend these important AIA-NJ events…

April 27. AIA NJ Fellows Reception for Jerome Leslie Eben. RSVP here by 4/17/17.

May 19. NJ Re-Forum. Municipal Land Use Law. Details and registration here.

June 12. Architect’s Action Day. Event Flyer is here.

June 22. East Coast Green: Health, Safety & Wellness. Here is the itinerary.

August 1. Community Resilience Course. Limited capacity; register here.

November 9-11. Quad States. AIA NJ Design Conference is at this event! Click here.

Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! The Pirbright Institute for Animal Health, by HDR, wins an AIA NJ Merit Award in the built open project category.

red_eaglePIRBRIGHT INSTITUTE, Surrey, England
HDR Aminal Health.jpg
A LABORATORY FOR LIVING
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In the countryside of Sussex, England, a new containment facility for the Pirbright Institute will revolutionize the way people work with viral diseases effecting animal and human health. The design ushers in a new paradigm for Category 4 bio-containment (similar to USBSL-3 enhanced) in which researchers work in labs and offices with large windows and expansive views, gather in an open light-filled atrium, and eat in the cafeteria—all within the containment boundary. A radical departure from traditional bunker-like containment facilities, this new model is safer, enhances research productivity, and is exponentially more comfortable and pleasant for researchers and staff. Arguably the most spectacular space in the new facility—and unheard of in a containment facility–is the glass three-story atrium topped by a glass oculus with views to the sky. On the ground floor, the atrium is not within the containment barrier, but visitors have views to containment spaces. Shared, unassigned write-up space is located on the first floor, within the containment barrier, and offers views through the atrium to other floors.
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The new facility was sited to create an entirely new entrance and entrance sequence to the Institute’s campus, and to take advantage of the expansive views to a forested ravine to the south. Further, the exterior materials were selected for their strong visual impact to reinforce the revolutionary nature of this facility—and in particular, to move away from conventional, sterile containment environments. The use of wood timber paneling, multi-colored window casings, transparent glass panels, and a carefully detailed metal brise-soleil were all selected to create a place that enhances researchers’ lives, and helps to brand the Pirbright Insitute as a new, vibrant place to work.
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Architecture Week 2017 applauds great architecture! Guerrilla Fitness, by Solid & Void, wins an AIA NJ Merit Award in the interior category.

red_eagleGuerrilla Fitness Cross Fit Gym
solid and void guerilla fitness.jpg
MOVEMENT. The space in this Cross Fit Gymnasium had two intentions:
1) Create an office for the owners to have a reprieve from the dynamic activity of the patrons
2) Direct the patrons through an office space to where the exercise area is.
The layout of the spaces are determined by these factors. The shape of the desks and the wall in the office are designed to “funnel” the focus of the owners to the window that peers through to the exercise area, and is anchored on the one side by a roughly formed concrete monolith, acting as a totem.
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DICHOTOMY. Concrete is, at various times, both fully plastic and fully rigid. It has the connotations of solidity and longevity associated with it, but isn’t so stoic that it can’t be slender and graceful. It has the potential to be very sculptural as in Saarinen’s TWA terminal, or monolithic and lumbering as in the works of Kahn. Both men used the same material but evoked entirely different reactions. The use of concrete was prominent in this design.
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DETAILS. All of the lines in the spaces are meant to augment the flow of traffic. The vertical edges on the large concrete wall are rounded where someone is meant to pass by. The slit of glass that follows along the curved wall flows around the corner in the concrete, as well as the custom made maple doors. The lights are positioned along axis flows, the lines of the door are horizontal and the floating ash wood bench has no vertical end supports that would visually impede the direction of foot traffic.
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Project Name: Guerilla Fitness
Project Location: 30 Dumont Place, Morristown, NJ
Firm Name: Solid & Void
Owner Name: Michael Pond, AIA