Philadelphia-based architectural firm recognized for work on Brown Hall

Atkin Olshin Schade Architects Receive AIA-NJ Design Award For Design of Renovations to Princeton University Student Housing Facility

AIA-NJ has recognized Philadelphia, P.A.–based architectural firm Atkin Olshin Schade Architects with a merit award in the built open category in recognition of its design work on David B. Brown Hall at Princeton University.

Located in the heart of the Princeton campus, the century-old brick and granite building serves as a residence hall to approximately 130 upperclassmen. The building was originally designed in the late 19th century in the Renaissance Revival style, and underwent renovations several decades ago.

Philadelphia-based Atkin Olshin Schade designed the renovation of the four-story structure and the improvements to student amenities. The team also increased accessibility to Brown Hall by adding a southern portal to the courtyard, improving connections to Cuyler Hall, the University Art Museum and other parts of the campus. Complementing the building’s existing design, the south portal mirrors the arched opening at the north side of the building and blends naturally with the existing façade.

“Brown Hall’s new gateway fits seamlessly into the building’s design and aligns with the University’s core aesthetic,” said Kimberly Bunn, AIA, president of AIA-NJ. “Atkin Olshin Schade has helped improve both the appearance of the building and its functionality for students, and their work certainly merits this accolade.”

Brown Hall contains 60 rooms and is newly equipped with renovated bathrooms, a new student laundry facility and trash chutes. Building system upgrades include a new fire alarm system, heating system steam controls and emergency lighting enhancements.

“We are proud of the work we have done to help Princeton University improve one of its key facilities,” said Michael Schade, AIA, LEED, AP BD+C, principal of Atkin Olshin Schade. “The school was intent on enhancing Brown Hall, and we were glad to be a part of the successful project while being able to preserve the building’s rich history.”

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