Monthly Archives: October 2013

Disaster Recovery with Good Samaritan Bill

Watch video taken at news conference held Monday, October 28, 2013, on the need for Good Samaritan legislation in New Jersey on the one year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy.

IMG_3286Majority Leader Greenwald on Improving Future Disaster Response, Recovery with Good Samaritan Bill (A-3694)

See video here:  http://vimeo.com/78010727

Proposed Good Samaritan Legislation in Response to Hurricane Sandy

Members of AIA-NJ were at the NJ State House today in support of Good Samaritan legislation.

AIA-NJ President Jack Purvis AIA,  along with Homeland Security Committee Chair and Past President Laurence Parisi AIA, President Elect Kurt Kalafsky AIA, and 1st Vice President Kimberly Bunn AIA at press conference with Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald.

AIA-NJ President Jack Purvis AIA, along with Homeland Security Committee Chair and Past President Laurence Parisi AIA, President Elect Kurt Kalafsky AIA, and 1st Vice President Kimberly Bunn AIA at press conference with Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald.

Reprinted from: News From The Assembly Democrats

GREENWALD: GOOD SAMARITAN LAW NEEDED TO IMPROVE

RESPONSE TO THE NEXT SUPERSTORM SANDY

(TRENTON) — Joined by professional experts the day before the one year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy making landfall in New Jersey, Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald (D-Camden, Burlington) called for Good Samaritan legislation to improve the state’s ability to respond to large-scale natural disasters.

Modeled after successful approaches used in 26 other states, A3694 would bolster safety inspection capacity in the aftermath of disasters like Sandy, the scale of which can easily overwhelm local governments.

“Whether it is tornadoes in Alabama, earthquakes in California or hurricanes in New Jersey, Good Samaritan laws are critical in ensuring a safe, effective and speedy response to major natural disasters,” said Greenwald. “By passing a Good Samaritan law in New Jersey, we will better prepare our state to respond rapidly and efficiently to the next Superstorm Sandy.”

Greenwald’s legislation, A3694, would shield licensed architects and Professional Engineers from liability when they volunteer their services in response to major natural disasters. Without such protection, many of these professionals are deterred from volunteering their professional aid in times of critical need—unduly restricting the ability to quickly and effectively provide safety inspections after a large-scale disaster.

“When our communities are in crisis after a natural disaster, they need all the help they can get,” said Greenwald. “Yet the potential for massive lawsuits keeps these critically needed volunteers on the sidelines. By enacting a Good Samaritan law, we will promote public safety while greatly strengthening our state’s ability to effectively respond to disasters.”

According to a 2013 article in Crain’s New York Business, nearly 400 architects stood ready to use their professional expertise to assist in assessing storm-damaged properties in New York City days after Superstorm Sandy hit. But the specter of thousands, if not millions, of dollars in potential lawsuit liability deterred the vast majority from volunteering their assistance, leaving local officials overwhelmed by the scale of the task. Without a Good Samaritan law, New Jersey faces a similar problem.

In contrast, Alabama’s Good Samaritan law, enacted in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina, was crucial in the aftermath of devastating tornadoes that killed 64 people and caused $2.2 billion in damage in April 2011. In response to the devastating category EF-4 tornado, over 200 professionals volunteered nearly 1,300 hours in Tuscaloosa alone, inspecting over 7,000 buildings for safety—critical assistance given the municipality’s limited staff resources.

“Volunteer licensed architects have been a key component in disaster response across the country for decades,” said Jack Purvis, A.I.A., President of the American Institute of Architects, NJ Chapter. “Majority Leader Greenwald’s Good Samaritan legislation will promote better safety and more efficient disaster response for the next natural disaster that hits New Jersey.”

“When major disaster strikes, volunteer Professional Engineers stand ready to answer the call,” said Robert Thiel, P.E., President of the New Jersey Society of Professional Engineers. “Majority Leader Greenwald deserves great credit for this Good Samaritan bill, which will help New Jersey better respond to the next big storm.”

To protect property owners, licensed professionals would be shielded from liability only after meeting A3694‘s rigorous legal standards. To qualify for immunity, licensed architects or Professional Engineers must provide professional services:

* Voluntarily and without compensation;

* At the request of a federal, state or local public safety official acting in his or her official capacity;

* At the scene of a declared national, state or local emergency caused by a major hurricane, earthquake, tornado, fire, explosion, collapse or similar disaster;

* During a limited period of time after the disaster (90 days following the emergency, with extensions permitted by gubernatorial executive order under the Governor’s emergency powers)

Under the bill, licensed architects or Professional Engineers would remain liable for the full extent of damages caused by their own acts or omissions that are wanton, willful or grossly negligent.

A3694 has been referred to the Assembly Regulated Professions Committee.

“Bridgeton Rose” Historic Preservation Awards Program

“BRIDGETON ROSE” HISTORIC PRESERVATION AWARDS PROGRAM ON NOVEMBER 13 FEATURES FAMOUS ARCHITECTS AND HISTORIC CHURCHES

Bridgeton, October 23, 2013. Do the names: Strickland–Eyre–Sloan–Furness–Venturi–mean anything to you? If so, you probably know more than a little something about historic American architecture.

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First Presbyterian Church

But even you could get an unexpected boost in your learning curve on Wednesday, November 13, when the City of Bridgeton Historic District Commission and the Center for Historic American Building Arts partner up for a third year’s celebration of the state’s largest historic district with the “Bridgeton Rose Awards,” and to thank those whose stewardship has benefited some of the district’s thousands of historic and architectural treasures.

“Our special theme this year is the great architects who stopped by Bridgeton to drop off some of their work,” says James Livoti, AIA, the Commission chairman and resident architect. “People may be a little surprised to see how many of them came through here. As an architectural legacy, it really does Bridgeton proud.”

The awards event will be held at Bonham Hall of the First Presbyterian Church, 119 West Commerce Street. The church itself, once known as “West Presbyterian,” was designed by the great Philadelphia architect, Samuel Sloan.

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A Second Empire Victorian (East Avenue)

In fact, Bridgeton churches have a special niche in the event program this year. The featured speaker is author Frank Greenagel, the authority on historic New Jersey churches whose most recent book is The Cumberland Churchscape. “As religious communities invested in major construction,” he says, “they often commanded the design skills of big-name architects.” But he adds that the area’s bounty of architected churches “is complemented by the beauty and character of some of its vernacular treasures.”

Flavia Alaya, the cultural historian who created the awards program and now heads CHABA, the Center for Historic American Building Arts in Bridgeton, promises a few surprises among the awards this year. “Expect to learn about some of the gems that need a spotlight to be appreciated,” she says. “Our goal is to highlight preservation as a tool for enhancing the district’s economic development potential,” she says, and adds that her own favorites among this year’s awardees are the smaller buildings and homes, gardens and neighborhoods that “people love and come together around.”

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A Lake Street home believed to be based on a Wilson Eyre design

“An awards program is a way of giving credit where it’s due, up at the top and in the middle and down at the grassroots too,” she says, “where the only incentive may be a spirit of caring, respect for what’s beautiful, and a will to add to everybody’s quality of life.”

She is quick to add that it doesn’t hurt to be able to point with pride to the handiwork of some of America’s finest architects. “It means that the largest historic district in the state–over 2000 properties–is large for a reason: it offers what Bridgeton alone CAN offer in this dense megalopolis of the Northeast corridor–a small, walkable postindustrial town with the entire American story, and the whole spectrum of American architecture, all in the palm of your hand–or maybe under the soles of your feet. How many small towns within an hour of Philly and two of New York can say that?”

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A vernacular single-family home on New Street in the Glen View section of the District

A brief meet and greet at 5:30 PM with sophisticated refreshments and musical entertainment will take attendees straight into the highly visual awards program, which runs to 7:30 PM. Ample free parking is available around the church. Tickets at $30 benefit the City of Bridgeton Historic Preservation Trust Fund, dedicated to the care of publicly-owned historic sites in the city.

Tickets are now available at Hankins Bros. (12 Broad Street) and the Cohansey Cafe (21 E. Commerce St.). They may also be purchased at the door on November 13.

Contact:
City of Bridgeton: Roberta Copeland: [email protected] 856-451-3407 x 2
CHABA: Flavia Alaya: [email protected]
the Center for Historic American Building Arts [chaba]
http://www.historicbuildingarts.org
ReVisioning New Jersey’s Largest Historic District
31 West Commerce Street
Bridgeton, NJ 08302
[email protected]

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Exalting the Word Church on South Avenue

Library of the Future – IDP Design Competition

National IDP Design Competition

This Competition is for those interns working with an advisor.  They can earn as much as 300 hours through participation in the Competition. Prequalification is not required; only submission by due date and application fee.  Teams are encouraged.

More information and forms can be viewed on the aiasfv.org website.

 

IDP Competition Flyer Phase2

Scientists, Architects, Engineers and Musicians –

NJIT Technology and Society Forum

Scientists, Architects, Engineers and Musicians – What Do They Have in Common?

Wednesday, November 13, 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Campus Center Ballroom

Musical Exploration with David Rimelis

Click Here for more information: Rimelis_flyer

WIA-NJ October Meeting

WIA New JerseyJoin Women In Architecture New Jersey for a discussion with Jenny Whitson. Jenny Joined Gensler in 2011 and quickly paved her path to become part of the firms leadership in sustainability.

Jenny brings over 7 years of experience and works on leading the sustainability effort at Gensler. With a Master of Science in Sustainable Design from Philadelphia University, Jenny balances her knowledge of both sustainability and design throughout her work.   Outside of the office, Jenny has lectured at Berkley College in Paramus NJ.

The format of this meeting will be an open discussion on carving your own path in the industry. Please come with your questions.  We will follow with a brief discussion regarding next steps for WIA-NJ.

Hosted by Gensler

When:       Tuesday, October 22st @ 6:00 PM

Where:      10 North Park Place, 4th Floor Morristown, NJ 07960

RSVP:              [email protected] by end of Monday, October 21st

Design Guidelines for Elevating Historic Buildings in NJ

red_eagleCALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

The Historic Resources Committee of

 AIA New Jersey

 is preparing

Design Guidelines for Elevating Historic Buildings in NJ

Owners of buildings in areas subject to flooding face a future that requires effective and thoughtful planning. Community flood hazard mitigation techniques (such as dune creation and drainage improvements) in concert with specific building techniques (such as resilient finishes, structural reinforcement and the relocation of utilities and systems) will reduce but not eliminate risk of serous damage in all cases.

Historic Guidelines PhotoAccording to data from the NJ Department of Environmental Protection/Historic Preservation Office, more than 30,000 historic properties lie wholly or partially within the flood plain. Even if a small percentage of these structures are raised, the number would be large and the impact great.

As a first step in the preparation of these guidelines, AIA-NJ is soliciting examples of likely candidates for elevation and existing buildings that have already been elevated or are in the process of being elevated from fellow architects, colleagues in engineering and construction, property owners and all other interested parties.

HOW AND WHAT TO SUBMIT

Please submit photos of actual examples (current or before and after) and all other pertinent information (including the property address and the name & contact information of the submitter) via email to [email protected] by Monday, November 4, 2013. Limit emails to no more than 7 megs (larger submissions will require multiple emails).

FUTURE STEPS

AIA-NJ will meet on November 9th to review the submission and to select as many as 12 examples to be investigated further, developed and possibly used as case studies and examples of best practices in forthcoming Guidelines.  The results of this call for submissions will be released in early 2014.  The information gathered is intended to provide guidance to owners of existing and historic buildings, local historic commissions and design professionals.

QUESTIONS?

Via email to [email protected]

Via fax to 609 884 8608

Via phone to 609 849 8410

Voting for 2013 Photography Competition Open

AIA West Jersey Photography CompetitionThe public voting portion of the 2013 AIA West Jersey Photography Competition is open.   Go to our website to place your vote for your favorite.

Many great images were submitted to this years competition.  A panel of three jurors narrowed all the entries to the finalists that are in the public voting portion.  The jurors and public votes will decide the top three images that received cash awards and the coveted cover spot on a printed 2014 calendar.

Thank you to our 2013 jurors:

– James DelGross, AIA
– Jack Purvis, AIA
– Michael Soriano, AIA

Voting ends midnight October 20th, so go cast your vote TODAY.

 

Emerging Professionals Showcase

AIANJ PechaKucha 101713

President’s Message – October 2013

Purvis_2013When I first started working my way up through the officers ranks, I thought the presidency would be an easy position to hold.  You know kiss a couple of babies, cut some ribbons, easy stuff.  It is not true. This has been one of the busiest years of my life and one of the more fulfilling.  I have had the benefit of a great Executive Committee, Committee Chairs and Board of Trustees. These are the members who volunteer their time and set the agenda and direction of AIA-NJ.   It is hard work by a dedicated few.   The AIA is like the factory in the industrial park that always has the help wanted sign out front. There is always a need for our members to join committees or become officers at the section and state level. I know Kurt Kalafsky is working on his committees for next year, if there is an interest I am sure we can find a position for you.

At the Board Meeting of September the following was reviewed.

  • AIA-NJ has been working on a Good Samaritan Bill. This will allow AIA member who want to act as first responders in case of a disaster to be provided with liability insurance similar to that provided to the police. Joe Simonetta, Larry Powers and Larry Parisi, Home Land Security Chairman has been working on behalf of the AIA to get the bill through the state legislature. The will be a press release on October 29 in one of the Towns that is still being rebuild.
  • AIA-NJ Website has been undergoing rebuilding as directed by Kim Bunn and Jason Peist. A new consult is in the process of redesigning the web site and making more users friendly. It will be completed this month.
  • AIA Repositioning is something that the AIA National is in the process of doing. This is a process to restructure the AIA National to be beneficial to all of its members.  If you have gone to a current meeting you should have had a chance to choose the items that you feel will help the member make better use of their membership. Kurt Kalafsky is the chairman of this committee and making it an important part of his presidency next year.
  • Jason Peist the Associate Regional Director has been working with the State Board of Architect to get a bill past to allow Architect Interns to start taking ARE exam prior to completing their three years of internship. He is also setting study groups for the ARE.
  • The Historical Preservation Office of NJ has asked AIA-NJ to develop guidelines for raising historic structures in the new flood zones. Mike Calafati is in the progress of developing a committee to create the standards. He will be looking for members who are now work on project to get their input.

This is just a small part of what the AIA-NJ is currently working on.  Education Committee,  CANstruction, Small Firm Round Table, L&GA, NJIT Center for Resiliency,  Diversity,  Women in Architecture, Post Sandy Regional Workshop and Membership are ongoing committees.

So the next time someone asks what is the AIA doing for me, this is just a small sampling.

The AIA-NJ will be having our Design Day Conference this week. Offering continuing education classes, world class key note speakers, design competition entries, and service award winners announced. This is the high light of our profession in New Jersey. I hope to see everyone there.

Jack Purvis, AIA

2013 AIA New Jersey President