Monthly Archives: February 2012

AIA South Jersey Membership Meeting

SAVE THE DATE

AIA South Jersey Membership Meeting
Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Avalon Links Restaurant
at Avalon Golf Course
1510 N Route 9
Cape May Courthouse, NJ 08210
Phone: 609-465-8086

Cocktails: 5:00 – 6:00pm (Cash Bar)
Dinner: 6:00 – 7:00pm
Member Meeting: 7:00 – 7:30pm
Presentation: 7:30 – 8:30pm

Cost: Free to AIA South Jersey Members
Interns & Associate Members: Free
Non-Members & Guests $35.00

Presentation by David Stutzman, AIA, CSI, CCS, SCIP, LEED AP
Principal at Conspectus, Inc
Program: “But That’s Not What I Meant”
Approval Pending for 1 AIA/CES LU

RSVP to Bruce Turner at (856) 405-0351 or by e-mail at [email protected] by Friday, March 16, 2012

DCA & NJ HISTORIC TRUST LAUNCH CAPITAL NEEDS SURVEY FOR NEW JERSEY HISTORIC SITES

Survey Will Help Identify Repair, Restoration, and Improvement Needs of Historic Places  

TRENTON, N.J. – New Jersey Department of Community Affairs (DCA) Acting Commissioner Richard E. Constable III today announced the launch of a new Capital Needs Survey that will collect information on the repair, restoration and improvement needs of historic sites throughout the state. The New Jersey Historic Trust, a DCA affiliate, is leading the effort and encourages all publicly owned and nonprofit-managed sites to participate in the survey.  “The Historic Trust recognizes that even our state’s most notable and celebrated historic sites and attractions have significant needs for repairs and improvements, all of which will ultimately serve the public better,” said Acting Commissioner Constable. “This survey will help the Trust identify those specific needs and begin to quantify the costs associated with making these historic buildings relevant and useful in their communities.”  The survey will begin on February 1, 2012, and run until May 1, 2012. It will pose questions about a building’s use, repair needs, projected repair costs, and, if appropriate, its participation in heritage tourism development.  A “historic building” is defined as a structure that was built more than 50 years ago, or prior to 1962.  A property does not need to be listed on the state or national Register of Historic Places to be included in the survey. Buildings that may participate include: historic residences, farmsteads, factories, theaters, museums, houses of worship, fire houses, libraries, railroad stations, schools and more. Buildings owned by private homeowners or businesses are not eligible for this survey.  This is the second Capital Needs Survey in the State of New Jersey. The first, in 1990, identified capital needs of more than $400 million. The results of the survey helped garner public support for four historic preservation bond referendums in the 1990s, and sustain historic preservation funding from the Garden Sate Preservation Trust from 2000 to 2010.  This year, the Historic Trust is hoping to attract more participants by making the survey accessible online.  “By using the Internet and making the survey easy to complete and submit, we hope to reach as many historic site stewards as possible,” said Historic Trust Executive Director Dorothy Guzzo. “The broader the participation, the better picture we will have of the state’s real need for historic preservation funding. “  Upon completion of the survey, the data will be analyzed and the capital needs of the state’s historic properties will be tallied and published by the end of the year. The Historic Trust will use the information to prioritize and/or revise criteria for its program, as well as to alert the community to begin thinking about their future stewardship needs.  “The Capital Needs Survey will provide New Jersey with important financial data to illustrate the continuing need for investment in the state’s historic resources,” said Historic Trust Chair Chris Perks. “Funding the preservation of existing buildings and structures helps make our communities more sustainable as well as enjoyable.”  The Historic Trust administers grants from the Garden State Historic Preservation Trust Fund, the NJ Cultural Trust Capital Preservation Grant Program, the “Discover NJ History” License Plate Fund and the 1772 Foundation Grant Program for New Jersey. Since 1990, the Historic Trust has awarded more than $134 million in matching preservation grants to sites in every county of the state.  Established in 1967, the New Jersey Historic Trust is the only nonprofit historic preservation organization in New Jersey created by state law. Its mission is to advance historic preservation in New Jersey for the benefit of future generations through education, stewardship and financial investment programs that saves the state’s heritage and strengthens its communities.  For more information on the New Jersey Historic Trust, please visit http://www.njht.org. For more information on the Capital Needs Survey, log on to http://fs19.formsite.com/NJHT/CapitalNeedsSurvey/index.html.

Public Architecture – Call for Articles

The following is a message from Edmond Gauvreau, the new editor of the AIA Public Architects publication Cornerstone:

“The best thing we can do as a community is share our success stories, cautionary tales, and other articles relating to the practice of architecture within the public realm. I am seeking any and all articles, with a special emphasis on master and community planning. Deadline for submission is March 9, 2012, with publication by the end of March/early April. Articles published in other forums are welcomed with appropriate permissions and attributions. Please contact me at (202) 761-09036, [email protected] if you have any questions.”

For more information about the AIA Public Architects Committee, please click here.

AIA Small Firm Round Table Seeks Case Studies

The AIA Small Firm Round Table (AIA SFRT) is seeking case studies of small firm collaboration to include in both an AIA Convention program and an article for the next edition of the AIA Architect’s Handbook of Professional Practice.

Responding architects should send a short description of their experience (whether positive or a “learning experience”) collaborating with other architecture firms, along with their contact information, to [email protected] The AIA SFRT is particularly interested in the following:

  • Have you formed alliances with other firms to pursue or complete projects that your firm cannot pursue or complete alone?
  • Have you collaborated with other firms to provide or attain special expertise for a particular project?
  • If you collaborate with other individual architects, how (and where) do you work with them?
  • Are you a small firm with the lead role in a large project?

For more information about the AIA SFRT please click here.

Note: In New Jersey, David Del Vecchio, AIA is the Chair of the AIA-NJ SFRT. He is also the New Jersey Regional Representative to the national AIA SFRT, and is a member of the Executive Committee of the national AIA SFRT.

Thank you in advance for your help.

Linda Reeder, AIA
Member, AIA SPP Advisory Group
Linda Reeder Architecture, LLC
96 Lyon Street
New Haven, CT 06511
T: 203.789.8377
F: 203.789.0264
[email protected]
www.LindaReederArch.com

East Coast Green 2012 Save the Date

AIANJ Executive Director to Chair IgCC Task Force

AIA New Jersey Executive Director, Joe Simonetta, was recently appointed the Chair of the Advocacy Committee of the AIA IgCC Task Force. The goal of the IgCC Task Force is to educate and advocate for the broad countrywide adoption of the IgCC. Joe chairs the Advocacy Subcommittee whose job is to create a strategy and collateral material for the AIA’s State and local components to assist in advocating for the IgCC adoption.

Black History Month Presentation

DCA & NJ HISTORIC TRUST LAUNCH CAPITAL NEEDS SURVEY FOR NEW JERSEY HISTORIC SITES

Survey Will Help Identify Repair, Restoration, and Improvement Needs of Historic Places

 

TRENTON, N.J. – New Jersey Department of Community Affairs (DCA) Acting Commissioner Richard E. Constable III today, January 31, 2012 announced the launch of a new Capital Needs Survey that will collect information on the repair, restoration and improvement needs of historic sites throughout the state. The New Jersey Historic Trust, a DCA affiliate, is leading the effort and encourages all publicly owned and nonprofit-managed sites to participate in the survey.

“The Historic Trust recognizes that even our state’s most notable and celebrated historic sites and attractions have significant needs for repairs and improvements, all of which will ultimately serve the public better,” said Acting Commissioner Constable. “This survey will help the Trust identify those specific needs and begin to quantify the costs associated with making these historic buildings relevant and useful in their communities.”

The survey will begin on February 1, 2012, and run until May 1, 2012. It will pose questions about a building’s use, repair needs, projected repair costs, and, if appropriate, its participation in heritage tourism development.

A “historic building” is defined as a structure that was built more than 50 years ago, or prior to 1962. A property does not need to be listed on the state or national Register of Historic Places to be included in the survey. Buildings that may participate include: historic residences, farmsteads, factories, theaters, museums, houses of worship, fire houses, libraries, railroad stations, schools and more. Buildings owned by private homeowners or businesses are not eligible for this survey.

This is the second Capital Needs Survey in the State of New Jersey. The first, in 1990, identified capital needs of more than $400 million. The results of the survey helped garner public support for four historic preservation bond referendums in the 1990s, and sustain historic preservation funding from the Garden Sate Preservation Trust from 2000 to 2010.

This year, the Historic Trust is hoping to attract more participants by making the survey accessible online.

“By using the Internet and making the survey easy to complete and submit, we hope to reach as many historic site stewards as possible,” said Historic Trust Executive Director Dorothy Guzzo. “The broader the participation, the better picture we will have of the state’s real need for historic preservation funding. “

Upon completion of the survey, the data will be analyzed and the capital needs of the state’s historic properties will be tallied and published by the end of the year. The Historic Trust will use the information to prioritize and/or revise criteria for its program, as well as to alert the community to begin thinking about their future stewardship needs.

“The Capital Needs Survey will provide New Jersey with important financial data to illustrate the continuing need for investment in the state’s historic resources,” said Historic Trust Chair Chris Perks. “Funding the preservation of existing buildings and structures helps make our communities more sustainable as well as enjoyable.”

The Historic Trust administers grants from the Garden State Historic Preservation Trust Fund, the NJ Cultural Trust Capital Preservation Grant Program, the “Discover NJ History” License Plate Fund and the 1772 Foundation Grant Program for New Jersey. Since 1990, the Historic Trust has awarded more than $134 million in matching preservation grants to sites in every county of the state. Established in 1967, the New Jersey Historic Trust is the only nonprofit historic preservation organization in New Jersey created by state law. Its mission is to advance historic preservation in New Jersey for the benefit of future generations through education, stewardship and financial investment programs that saves the state’s heritage and strengthens its communities.

For more information on the New Jersey Historic Trust, please visit http://www.njht.org. For more information on the Capital Needs Survey, log on to http://fs19.formsite.com/NJHT/CapitalNeedsSurvey/index.html.